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The Sky Road Hardcover – Aug 1 2000


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books (August 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312873352
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312873356
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 15 x 3.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 590 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,622,974 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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She walked through the fair in the light of a northern summer evening, looking for me. Read the first page
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By John Howard on May 7 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book was ok. It was interesting to read, but there was nothing particularly special about it.
I never really felt much concern over what was going to happen with the characters or the story. I wanted to find out what happened, but I didn't have any strong feelings about the characters or what I thought should happen.
I've seen other reviews here that seem to indicate that this is part of a series. If that is the case, then perhaps I missed something in an earlier book that would have made this more enjoyable. I will probably investigate this and try to read any earlier books because I do think MacLeod writes well. Hopefully, in one of his other books I will find the spark that I think was lacking in this one.
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By "corsaudio" on Feb. 17 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book was my first exposure to Macleod and I'm sorry I bought it. If this book did not have a cover and I was asked what genre it belonged to, I would have said "romance". It is sappy and slow with very transparent characters and ultimately not believable.
The writing is not good. Structurally, instead of developing characters through their actions, stereotypical people whose motives are dictated by their job title are used as walk-ons. And much of what should be told with action and dialogue is told through narrative. The specifics are not stellar, either. Here is an example: "The thought...appeared like a screensaver on the surface of her mind, whenever her mind went blank." And another (that I assume echoes romance novels): "She pulled away the curtain to reveal a large and reassuringly solid-looking bed...We faced each other naked, like the Man and the Woman in the Garden in the story."
If you like that kind of thing then maybe you'll like this book. If you like books with crisp plots and lots of ideas, then look for something else.
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By Thomas Beck on Sept. 18 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have not read any of Ken McLeod's other books, and it is not clear from anything on the cover that The Sky Road is part of a series or that is necessary to have read any of its predecessors. So, if my review seems uninformed by the other books, that's because it is.
The Sky Road was on the ballot for this year's Hugo Award, which merely reminds me that last year was a relatively week year for novels (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire won the Hugo for Best Novel, to a quite enthusiastic reception at the Millennium Philcon where it was announced.)
The Sky Road is an awkward and somewhat arbitrary combination of near-future and far-future history. The near future is set in the middle of the 21st century, after some (to me, at least) unspecified worldwide paradigm shifts that have left the capitalist world in a shambles, the United States a relatively toothless beast, and a handful of space visionaries trying to execute some kind of coup, presumably to put themselves in power. The protagonist is Myra Godwin-Davidova, an American-born potentate in the "International Scientific and Technical Workers Republic," a tiny statelet in what was once the Soviet Union and is now again more than a collection of "former Soviet states" and not quite an empire.
Myra's chapters alternate with those of Clovis colha Gree, a part-time history graduate student and part-time laborer on a spacecraft, centuries in the future, after Myra (known to posterity as "The Deliverer" for her mythical destruction of evil capitalism). Clovis, a Scot, is working on his dissertation about Myra.
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Format: Hardcover
Thinly plotted, poor characterisation and utterly self-indulgent. What a disappointment this book was. Quite clearly Ken had a couple of good ideas and attempted to build a novel around them. It didn't work, and the whole enterprise seemed to lack vision and depth. Sorry to be so negative, but that's my honest opinion.
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Format: Hardcover
Having enjoyed "The Cassini Division" and "The Stone Canal", I was looking forward to this book with great expectations. Unfortunately, it came up somewhat short. That's not to say it's a bad book; but it isn't as intellectually stimulating, or as entertaining as its predecessors.
As usual, the writing is elegant, and generally superb. The story is well plotted, and moves along at a reasonable pace. However, when all was said and done, I didn't really feel like I had gone anywhere by reading this book. The story was entertaining, but there was no real climax, and hence no real resolution.
Perhaps that is what Macleod was striving for; a vehicle to develop characters for future works. If that is the case, he succeeded admirably. I suspect that this is a novel that will always be regarded in the context of his other works, rather than on its own merits.
Still, I enjoyed this book, and would recommend it to anyone who likes their science fiction on the serious side.
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Format: Hardcover
After its two thrilling predecessors, The Stone Canal and The Cassini Division, The Sky Road turns out to be a disappointment. For one thing, it depicts a world which seems decidedly inconsistent with the backdrop of The Cassini Division - which should occur between the two threads present in this book. For another, the technology of The Sky Road is much lower than in earlier books, with only slight incremental improvements on what we have today in the year 2000 (plus a powerful artificial intelligence who mostly stays in the background).
Thematically, I suppose The Sky Road is about individuals who become disillusioned with their beliefs over time, although it's a weakly-portrayed theme. Otherwise, the book presents a moral dilemma for its character Myra in the year 2058, who grapples with it in ultimately unsatisfying ways (her ultimate solution is telegraphed a mile away), and a voyage of discovery for its character Clovis, farther in the future (the 26th century?) as he learns about the legendary figure of Myra and discovers what his lover Merrial is up to.
The sense of wonder is low, and although this book might be a decent build-up to another book, the end leaves you wondering, "That's it? What happens next?" Which isn't what one really wants out of a novel.
As always, MacLeod's writing is fine, his characters enjoyable, and his mixture of politics with science fiction engaging. Unfortunately, it's all in the service of a rather bland story here. His earlier work is much better.
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