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The Somali Doctrine
 
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The Somali Doctrine [Kindle Edition]

James Grenton

Print List Price: CDN$ 15.07
Kindle Price: CDN$ 4.03 includes free international wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
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Product Description

Product Description

A lone man lies disfigured and dying by the roadside in the arid plains of northern Somalia...

Thousands of refugees are found massacred in a camp next to the Ethiopian border...

A convoy vanishes on its way to distribute food aid...

Rumours circulate that Somali militia are responsible, but Interpol agent Jim Galespi suspects the truth is even more sinister. Sent undercover to Somalia to investigate, he soon finds himself pitted against the two madmen who have taken control of Universal Action, the world's largest NGO.

Galespi's quest to uncover the truth about Universal Action and the unfolding tragedy in Somalia throws him into the centre of an international conspiracy that threatens to engulf Africa and the Western world.

From the deserts of Somaliland, the slums of Nairobi and the ruins of Mogadishu to the plush hotels of Cape Town all the way to the UK government in London, the race is on to stop disaster from striking again.

And again.

And again.

Intricate and fast paced, The Somali Doctrine is an intelligent action adventure in the vein of Michael Crichton.

WARNING: THIS BOOK CONTAINS SCENES OF VIOLENCE THAT MAY UPSET SOME READERS.


About the author: After spending 15 years in the international development sector, James Grenton burst onto the writing scene with his debut novel, The Somali Doctrine. His three other novels are also available on Kindle.

About the Author

James Grenton graduated from Oxford University with a BA in History and Economics and then obtained an MSC in Business Studies. He started his career in financial journalism before moving to the international development sector, where he worked for 15 years and travelled extensively across Africa, Asia and Latin America. He was also the CEO of a fast-growing NGO and has an MA in Journalism and a PhD in Sociology. His passions are social issues and writing.

Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 431 KB
  • Print Length: 334 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 146621757X
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: ITP (May 16 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0052U9LXA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #241,974 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  25 reviews
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, thrilling plot, strong message: a must read! June 11 2011
By Max Krispel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
The Somali Doctrine is a gripping novel which I highly recommend. From Mogadishu, Addis Ababa, to Paris, London, Johannesburg and Nairobi, the plot never slackens, as you are taken into the sinister plot involving Somali militias, mercenary forces and non governmental organizations.

This is also a novel with a message. James Grenton portrays the negative impact on Africa of organizations (militias, mercenary forces, but also NGOs) that are unaccountable to the societies they operate in, with their own agenda and serving their own interests.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A gripping read - more please! July 7 2011
By Simon T Nield - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
I have always been a fan of Robert Ludlum's earlier books; you could almost feel the pain suffered by his characters, making their inevitable brutal revenge all the more sweet. Grenton's characters are certainly made to suffer, but this is a more grown-up affair than Ludlum's Bourne trilogy - probably a reflection of the moral ambiguity of the modern world in contrast to the clear distinctions of the Cold War. There are no forgone conclusions here, and this is not a comfortable ride for the reader; there are some genuinely shocking moments, and it is hard not to feel tainted by the corruption and compromise of the main characters and events.
I hope there's more where this came from.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A real page turner June 20 2011
By John Keane - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
A real page turner - full of action and excitement throughout. I've not read a book so quickly in years!
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A haunting and relevant thriller June 20 2011
By jeroen ten berge - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
The Somali Doctrine, James Grenton's debut, is the story of an Interpol agent making it his mission to stop the remorseless madmen at the helm of the world's largest NGO. The Somali Doctrine is all fiction, however, James Grenton has been witness to most situations and aspects touched upon in this haunting thriller, that takes us from real life disasters in Somaliland to Nairobi slums, plush South African hotels, and London. A terrific read and highly recommended.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars NGO bad guys Dec 28 2012
By Eric Harper - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Action and brutal killings. Though fictional, it gave a slight jab at big NGO's, which wasn't necessarily a bad thing.

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