CDN$ 16.75
  • List Price: CDN$ 22.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 6.20 (27%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Usually ships within 3 to 5 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Song of Daniel Hardcover – Jul 28 2003


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 16.75
CDN$ 16.75 CDN$ 2.96

Best Books of 2014
Unruly Places, Alastair Bonnett’s tour of the world’s most unlikely micro-nations, moving villages, secret cities, and no man’s lands, is our #1 pick for 2014. See all


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 312 pages
  • Publisher: Peachtree Publishers (July 28 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0934601755
  • ISBN-13: 978-0934601757
  • Product Dimensions: 3.2 x 15.9 x 24.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 658 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Set in Athens, Ga., and centering on a serene cemetery with its suggestions of sorrow, loss and redemption, Williams's ( The Heart of a Distant Forest ) latest novel is evocative of place and beautifully written, but is marred by sentimentality. Daniel Mitchell is a simple young man, not retarded yet not "normal"; raised in a "home," he is now living on his own and working in the cemetery. Rebecca Gentry, a recently divorced poet, teaches at the university. Blocked in her efforts to write the biography of a local poet who had killed himself years ago, she is sad to the point of despair. Walking in the cemetery, she meets Daniel and is greatly moved by his innocence. The two become friends, and gradually their lives intertwine, Daniel stepping into the real world, with its heartbreak, and Rebecca emerging from her depression. Parallel plots follow Rebecca, as she discovers the reclusive former lover of the poet and resumes work on the biography, and Daniel, as he goes through the pain of acknowledging a horrifying past. Williams, also a poet, writes lyrically, but his characters, while memorable, serve the author's themes too readily.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Childhood witness to his father's murdering his mother's lover, 28-year-old Daniel Mitchell has avoided terrible memories by remaining willfully childlike, apparently retarded. His innocence and affectionateness prompt his new friend Rebecca Gentry, a recently divorced university professor of English, to question her values and more easily to understand the life of Lawrence Dale, a poet-suicide on whom she has long been preparing a book. In a lyric style perhaps too rich in questionably relevant detail, Williams's novel, set in Georgia, explores the values and hazards of innocence and the redeeming virtues of different types of love.
- Charles C. Nash, Cottey Coll., Nevada, Mo.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
I read Song of Daniel some years ago, and I still think of it with wonder. The plot is moving, the characters unforgettable, and the writing tender and loving. In fact, the book is the best sort of "southern" novel. To a southerner, that does not mean that the book is about the South, although Williams' evocations of the southern setting are loving and poetic. Rather, the southern novel seems to distinguish itself by the author's love of language. Williams' voice is gentle, beautiful, and touching--sometimes to the point that it evokes tears. But don't think that the book is maudlin. The tenderness is genuine, authentic. Of special interest to those familiar with the marvelous (and largely forgotten) Georgia poet, Byron Herbert Reece, a subplot involves the research of a University of Georgia professor into just such a Georgia mountain poet. Song of Daniel gripped and moved me as few books ever have. Its power over the imagination and the emotions is so great that I have not reread it yet: after perhaps ten years, it is still too strong in my memory. But it holds a special place among those books that I _will_ reread. Although they are very different writers, the only southern novelist I would compare with Williams (based on this book) is Walker Percy, and that's the highest praise I can offer. Buy this book and take it to a quiet place.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By book yeti on May 20 2003
Format: Hardcover
... I set out to read one of his earlier novels - a touching piece entitled The Song of Daniel. It was a very heartfelt and sincere story about a young man named Daniel Mitchell, living in a world of his own. It was a peaceful life - an escape from reality that he created for himself, after he had been exposed to unspeakable violence in his early childhood. This realm of Daniel's remains untouched, until he meets worldly and somewhat cynical Rebecca. As a result, they learn much from each other. In this masterpiece, Williams has conveyed Daniel's thoughts, vulnerabilities, and deepest fears with such an indescribable intricacy that puts us in his shoes. Finally Daniel deals with the uprising of his past in his own way. I really enjoyed this book.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By carly on Feb. 14 2000
Format: Hardcover
I love the song of daniel. when you read it, you feel like you are sitting next to daniel in the cemetary, the details are so vivid. it's the first book I've ever read that I literally couldn't put down. I read it in one day, and would recommend it to anyone who needs to read a book they will never forget.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
A wonderfully written book about life and innocence and finding oneself. Wonderful imagery. The characters were extremely likable. It was especially interesting to me because I grew up in Athens, Georgia and visited the cemetery often, so I could really relate to the scenery set in this book.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A hauntingly memorable novel May 27 2000
By jpendley@bellsouth.net - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I read Song of Daniel some years ago, and I still think of it with wonder. The plot is moving, the characters unforgettable, and the writing tender and loving. In fact, the book is the best sort of "southern" novel. To a southerner, that does not mean that the book is about the South, although Williams' evocations of the southern setting are loving and poetic. Rather, the southern novel seems to distinguish itself by the author's love of language. Williams' voice is gentle, beautiful, and touching--sometimes to the point that it evokes tears. But don't think that the book is maudlin. The tenderness is genuine, authentic. Of special interest to those familiar with the marvelous (and largely forgotten) Georgia poet, Byron Herbert Reece, a subplot involves the research of a University of Georgia professor into just such a Georgia mountain poet. Song of Daniel gripped and moved me as few books ever have. Its power over the imagination and the emotions is so great that I have not reread it yet: after perhaps ten years, it is still too strong in my memory. But it holds a special place among those books that I _will_ reread. Although they are very different writers, the only southern novelist I would compare with Williams (based on this book) is Walker Percy, and that's the highest praise I can offer. Buy this book and take it to a quiet place.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
read this Feb. 14 2000
By carly - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I love the song of daniel. when you read it, you feel like you are sitting next to daniel in the cemetary, the details are so vivid. it's the first book I've ever read that I literally couldn't put down. I read it in one day, and would recommend it to anyone who needs to read a book they will never forget.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
a touching story May 20 2003
By book yeti - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
... I set out to read one of his earlier novels - a touching piece entitled The Song of Daniel. It was a very heartfelt and sincere story about a young man named Daniel Mitchell, living in a world of his own. It was a peaceful life - an escape from reality that he created for himself, after he had been exposed to unspeakable violence in his early childhood. This realm of Daniel's remains untouched, until he meets worldly and somewhat cynical Rebecca. As a result, they learn much from each other. In this masterpiece, Williams has conveyed Daniel's thoughts, vulnerabilities, and deepest fears with such an indescribable intricacy that puts us in his shoes. Finally Daniel deals with the uprising of his past in his own way. I really enjoyed this book.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
"Song of Daniel" By Philip Lee Williams Jan. 26 2000
By Louie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
A wonderfully written book about life and innocence and finding oneself. Wonderful imagery. The characters were extremely likable. It was especially interesting to me because I grew up in Athens, Georgia and visited the cemetery often, so I could really relate to the scenery set in this book.
Not quite up to HEART OF A DISTANT FOREST Oct. 24 2007
By Charles W. Semones - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am sorry that I cannot give this novel quite the glowing review that others here have given it. I like Philip Lee Williams' work very much and found his first novel a masterpiece. I enjoyed THE SONG OF DANIEL very much until just before the last third of the novel. I felt that at that point Mr. Williams' relaxed his pacing, delivered some dialogue that is nothing short of corny, and that UG professor Rebecca and the dying lady Rachel were on the verge of becoming unglued as credible characters. I too found the tie-in with the true story of Byron Herbert Reese quite interesting (I am intrigued by Reese and have read everything I can find by and about him) but Mr.Williams departs drastically from the story of Reese in this book when he brings in the character of Rachel, the death pact on the mountaintop and, well, just the entire matter becomes a good deal preposterous as one nears the end of the novel. I do think that Philip Lee Williams is a fine novelist. I just cannot agree that THE SONG OF DANIEL is quite worthy of him. I kept feeling that he was striving to meet a deadline and so the last third of the novel somehow, to my regret, fell apart for me. And Daniel is indeed one of the most exasperating characters I ever encountered in any novel. Surely any perceptive reader knows that such a person in real life would, of necessity, be in an institution. This having been said, I will read the more recent novels of Philip Lee Williams--his talent is immense, prodigious. And I am fascinated to learn that he is also a composer. Before learning this, I suspected early in the novel that the author had a strong affinity for classical music. He has his character Rebecca always playing it.


Feedback