The Old Spanish Trail (The Trail Drive) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
CDN$ 22.08
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by bwbuk_ltd
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from the UK. Former Library book. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Your purchase also supports literacy charities.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Old Spanish Trail Hardcover – Large Print, Dec 2000


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Large Print
"Please retry"
CDN$ 999.11 CDN$ 22.06

Gifts For Dad
--This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.




Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Ulverscroft Large Print Books; Large type edition edition (December 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0708992064
  • ISBN-13: 978-0708992067
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 15.2 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 544 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Product Description

About the Author

Ralph Compton stood six-foot-eight without his boots. His first novel in the Trail Drive series, The Goodnight Trail, was a finalist for the Western Writers of America Medicine Pipe Bearer Award for best debut novel. He was also the author of the Sundown Rider series and the Border Empire series. A native of St. Clair County, Alabama, Compton worked as a musician, a radio announcer, a songwriter, and a newspaper columnist before turning to writing westerns. He died in Nashville, Tennessee in 1998. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
At the herd, Webb's companions waited anxiously. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

By Max Inman on April 30 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Rand Hayes and his men had sold 5000 head of prime Texas beef to a man in Santa Fe. But they find out he has been murdered. Now they must try to get rid of them. Some states have banned Texas beef. So this leaves Los Aneles as their choice. To do so they must cross 2 mountain ranges and the deadly Mohave Desert.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on Aug. 13 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Reluctant to see the novel end. Got to know the characters. Very well done, with suspense, edge of seat adventure. Good history as well - the route is accurate.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The book paints a wonderful picture of the scenery and conditions faced by the cowboys. The plot provides adventure with a solid moral theme.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 11 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A GOOD READ April 30 2003
By Max Inman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Rand Hayes and his men had sold 5000 head of prime Texas beef to a man in Santa Fe. But they find out he has been murdered. Now they must try to get rid of them. Some states have banned Texas beef. So this leaves Los Aneles as their choice. To do so they must cross 2 mountain ranges and the deadly Mohave Desert.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A Great Read Aug. 13 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Reluctant to see the novel end. Got to know the characters. Very well done, with suspense, edge of seat adventure. Good history as well - the route is accurate.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Keep Your Attention good read June 17 1998
By jfcmets@aol.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The book paints a wonderful picture of the scenery and conditions faced by the cowboys. The plot provides adventure with a solid moral theme.
Okay Read if You Don't Mind a Few Discrepancies May 1 2014
By Burton Falk - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A native of St. Clair County, Alabama, Ralph Compton was a big man, standing six-foot-eight without his boots. Early on, he worked as a musician, a radio announcer, a songwriter, and a newspaper columnist. He began his writing career with The Goodnight Trail (1992), which was chosen as a finalist for the "Medicine Pipe Bearer Award," bestowed by Western Writers of America for the best debut novel. .Compton's Trail Drive series eventually grew to include The Western Trail, The Chisholm Trail, The Banders Trail, The California Trail, The Shawnee Trail, The Virginia City Trail, The Dodge City Trail, The Oregon Trail, The Santa Fe Trail, The Deadwood Trail, The Green River Trail, and, of course, The Old Spanish Trail, reviewed below. Compton was also the author of the Sundown Rider series and the Border Empire series. During the last few years of his life, in fact, he authored more than two dozen novels, some of which made it onto the USA Today bestseller list for fiction.
Ralph Compton died in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1998 at the age of 64.
The Old Spanish Trail begins in San Antonio, Texas, in early February, 1862. The Civil War is raging in the eastern U.S., and the price of beef in Texas has fallen to less than three dollars a head. Don Webb, a local rancher, has received a letter from a former Texan who, after moving to New Mexico five years earlier and acquiring a land grant near Santa Fe, and was interested in buying 5,000 cattle, delivered, for $30 a head. Webb and a group of nine fellow Texans decide to fulfill the contract.
In early May, after assembling a herd and driving it to Santa Fe, the Texans discover that their potential buyer and his wife were recently murdered by a gang of outlaws. A local livery stable owner informs them, however, that, if they could drive the herd all the way to Los Angeles, they might be able to sell the cattle for even an even higher price. Stubborn and unfazed, the Texans and their cattle depart forthwith, heading for Los Angeles, following the, by then, seldom-used Old Spanish Trail.
In fact, after the American acquisition of northern Mexico territory in 1848, travel over the Old Spanish Trail began to diminish. Roads designed for military use were surveyed and built. Americans moving westward, including the '49ers, found easier routes to California. For the Texans, the disused trail, no longer always obvious, seemed to be their best choice. Little did they know that a band of Utes in Utah, who had recently taken six young American women as captives, and a band of Piutes in Nevada, who were just downright mean, were poised to cause them serious troubles. In addition, the outlaws who had murdered the potential buyer in Santa Fe, decided to track the outfit at a distance and hijack their herd shortly before their arrival in Southern California. If that weren't enough, longhorn cattle, when they stampede in storms, manage to slash themselves, the cow punchers and the cowboys' horses. Several hair-raising escapades lay in ahead for the Texas ten.
So, you may wonder, considering the historic and geographic research required to write such a story, just how well did Compton succeed in his fact checking?
Well, in my opinion, while the author may have known Texas, Texans, and longhorn cattle, he assuredly wasn't too familiar with the Great Basin, the Mojave Deserts, or the Indians who lived on them.
First, a minor issue. By 1862, two hundred years after the Spanish first arrived on the scene, most western Indian tribes had acquired at least a few rifles. Compton, however, makes no mention of the Piutes or the Utes using anything but bow and arrows during their skirmishes with the cowboys.
There are several other inaccuracies as well, two of which are almost laughable. While the Texans are crossing the Mojave Desert, Don Webb, the trail boss, "wiped his sweating brow, it was gritty, and there was a smudge on the back of his hand. Somewhere, to the north, in the Great Basin, men had been riding in the darkness, so that there would be no dust against the blue of the morning sky." In the next paragraph, we discover that those men, the outlaws, were fifty miles away. Really? Webb felt dust raised fifty miles away?
Finally, with the cattle drive to Los Angeles a success, Webb is ready to board a ship bound for Texas, where his girl friend awaits him. His fellow Texans inquire if he would like to have them see him off. "'The landing is near enough for me to walk,' Don replied." Walking form central Los Angeles to San Pedro? I don't think so.
If you have nothing better to do, and you don't mind a few discrepancies, The Old Spanish Trail offers a reasonably exciting read.
Old Spanish Trail Feb. 18 2014
By Unknown - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
What A great story. It is one that is hard to put down. Worried about the start of the Civil War and what will happen to Texas,cattle is driven to California but the trip has outlaws, Indian captives,and battles with 2 different tribes. Hard to put down.


Feedback