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The Star Trek: Enterprise: The Expanse [Paperback]

J.M. Dillard
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
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Book Description

Oct. 1 2003 Star Trek
High above the planet Earth, an alien probe appears -- and in an unspeakably horrific instant, releases a deadly blast that strafes the planet's surface, leaving a miles-wide, smoldering crater of destruction in its wake. Millions die in Florida, Cuba, and Venezuela, their lives blotted out in a blazing millisecond.
Just as swiftly, the probe implodes and crashes on the planet surface, but the remnants provide no clue as to its origin. Who are the attackers, and what provoked them?
Aboard the Starship Enterprise™, Captain Jonathan Archer learns of the destruction. His ship is called home; it is uncertain whether its mission of space exploration will continue.

But before Enterprise reaches Earth, Archer is abruptly kidnaped from the bridge by the time-traveling enemies he has encountered before. He finds himself aboard a Suliban vessel, face-to-face with his old nemesis, Silik, a high-ranking indiviual in a battle known only as the Temporal Cold War. Silik leads him to his master, a mysterious humanoid from the far future.
The humanoid claims that the attack on Earth was just a test; and the next attack will destroy Archer's home planet...unless he and the Enterprise crew stop it.
To do so, they must enter a region of space called The Expanse - an area so dangerous that no ship has ever emerged from it unscathed. Vulcan crews were driven to bloodthirsty madness, Klingon crews were anatomically inverted, their internal organs exposed outside their bodies...while they still lived. Many vessels were lost, never to be heard from again.
Archer faces the greatest crisis of his career: Should he believe Silik's time-traveling master, and expose his ship and crew to the perils of The Expanse, in hopes of saving Earth from destruction? And can he convince Starfleet Command and the Vulcan High Council to let Enterprise go to face her biggest challenge?

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About the Author

J. M. Dillard grew up coddled in the wilds of central Florida. After leaving her mother's sheltering arms, she left Florida to reside in various locales, including Washington, D.C., Vermont, and?for the past twelve years?southern California. She herself now coddles a two-hundred-pound husband and two ninety-pound Labradors, all of whom are well-trained but persist in believing themselves to be lapdogs.

She is the author of a plethora of Star Trek™ books; as Jeanne Kalogridis(her evil alter-ego), she is the author of the acclaimed Diaries of the Family Dracul trilogy, and the historical fantasy The Burning Times.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1

He was a Xindi warrior, of his culture's highest class, and out of a sense of decorum he had worn his ceremonial armor on this, his last mission, though he would not need it, and though it could not protect him from his fate.

He had already attended his own death ceremony, already been honored for the heroic deed he would perform on behalf of his people, his homeworld, against the Enemy-to-come. Then, he had felt only a sense of pride. He had been accorded every pleasure, every desire: his kin were left behind with great prestige and wealth. They would build monuments to his memory.

Now he sat in the Enemy's home system, at the controls of the destroyer/probe. It was a handsome craft: two concentric spheres, each as perfect as his world, each rotating within the other. It had two functions: the first, to send information to his leaders; the second, to destroy.

The warrior passed through the alien solar system without difficulty, and sped toward his target: the planet where the Enemy-to-come dwelled, unaware as yet of its future crime. The world itself -- Earth, an ugly word, bitter on the tongue -- was not as hideous as the warrior had imagined, with its swirls of blue and green. There was, in fact, an odd beauty to it. For an instant, the warrior permitted himself to consider the life-forms dwelling there, on the green landforms, in the blue oceans: They were unaware of the crimes that would be perpetrated by their heirs, and therefore not guilty. The Xindi knew nothing of their culture: perhaps they were not so different from his own people.

He censored the thought at once: Such reflection was dangerous, and could only hinder his mission.

He slowed his vessel, and dropped down into the lower atmosphere, confident that he would not be detected, given the primitive science of the natives.

He programmed the targeted area -- a peninsula and island in the western hemisphere -- into his weapon's sites. All went as he had practiced in the hundreds of simulations, yet he could not shake a feeling of displacement, of anxiety -- was it caused by his great distance from his homeworld, or was it cowardice in the face of his own demise?

The ancient ceremonial armor, thicker and heavier than the sleek battle armor to which he was more accustomed, made his fingers feel thick, even clumsy, as he pressed the controls; beneath it, his scales had grown overheated. Since there was nothing he could do to help his body cast off the unwanted heat, he shrugged off all concerns about himself -- they were, at this stage, useless -- and watched, with grim delight, as the weapon performed exactly as designed.

He glanced at a small monitor showing the destroyer/probe from the exterior: The concentric spheres rotated into position so that the emitters lined up perfectly.

The deck beneath his feet began to hum as the weapon powered up. He watched the bitter-named Earth on the viewscreen as a blast of pure destruction streamed from his vessel and strafed the island and peninsula, as well as the body of water where they rested. Even from the stratosphere, the warrior could see plumes of steam rising from the sea, black smoke streaming up from the land.

Marvelous; just as in the simulations.

The warrior finished his task with a sense of accomplishment, and sent the triumphant information back to his leaders: the weapon had worked precisely as designed. So this had been the source of his anxiety: the possibility of failure. Now that it was gone, he feared nothing.

He received back a prerecorded message of congratulations and farewell.

He programmed his vessel to self-destruct without hesitation or reluctance. He did not think of his children, his mates, his parents, or his fellow warriors. He did not, in fact, permit himself to think at all. He merely braced himself physically for what was to come, and when at last the destroyer/probe imploded, there was no time even to flinch.

He was, like his victims on the surface, killed immediately, his scale-covered flesh seared in a blindingly bright millisecond. However, an explosive in the vessel's engine failed to ignite; the exterior of the destroyer/probe remained intact, and tumbled towards the planet surface -- evidence for alien hands to paw over, alien minds to contemplate.

Even his corpse failed to be incinerated -- more evidence, to indicate the involvement of his species.

Had the warrior lived to know this, he would have been deeply disappointed.

Copyright © 2003 by Paramount Pictures

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
He was a Xindi warrior, of his culture's highest class, and out of a sense of decorum he had worn his ceremonial armor on this, his last mission, though he would not need it, and though it could not protect him from his fate. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
3.8 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic book version of the series episodes! June 18 2004
By Eric
Format:Paperback
And especially interesting because of the Xinti, who, as anyone who watches the television series, knows are responsible for millions of dead humans on Earth. As fascinating as "The Expanse" episodes were, this novel brings the newest addition to the Star Trek legacy out in ways only a novel can. This book following the ENTERPRISE and company ranks with other sci-fi books: "Stranger in a Strange Land", "Puppet Masters", "2001", "2010", "Rendezvous with Rama", "Ringworld", all the "Star Trek" novels of course and all "Star Wars" books too, as well as books as new to the genre as "Advent of the Corps" and others.
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars ST - Enterprise: The Expanse April 30 2004
Format:Paperback
Star Trek - Enterprise: "The Expanse" a novelization by J.M. Dillard based on the episodes "The Expanse" and "The Xindi" written by Rich Berman and Brannon Braga follows these episodes quite well. I saw the episodes after I read the book and I must say that I enjoyed the book much better.
"The Expanse" starts out with a partial destruction of Earth as seven million people die from Florida, to Cuba, to Venezuela and that a probe from the planet Xindi is to blame. As this probe crashes to Earth, Archer and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC NX-01 are being recalled to Earth and are refitted for a rather gruelling mission.
"The Expanse" has good charater interaction and you get a good feeling that you begin to interact with the crew when reading this book. There is good character involvement between Jonathan Archer and his crew as they are in spacedock around Earth and the interaction to the next mission. As the Enterpise and her crew are coming to Earth they are intercepted by a Suliban ship from the future and yes, who else but Silik is the one to bring Archer aboard his ship to hear "a humanoid" from the future tell Archer what's in store for the Earth.
"The Expanse" moves along quite quickly and you'll find that you've finished the book in short order as the NX-01 is sent to the Delphic Expanse to find the homeworld of the Xindi. The Xindi are a race of 5 different species all of which are intelligent... primate, reptilian, marsupial, insectoid and sea creatures simular to a dolphin. All of the races work together in a government simular to a republic, but they've been tipped as to what happens to their homeworld in 400 years in the future and there is a temporal rift that may occur.
Read more ›
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3.0 out of 5 stars If you watched the episodes, the book ruins it. Nov. 28 2003
Format:Paperback
If you watched the episodes, the book ruins it. J.M. Dillard, the person who wrote Star Trek Generations, Star Trek: First Contact and Star Trek: Insurrection has now written the Star Trek: Enterprise book, "The Expanse."
It tells the story of the second season finale, "The Expanse", and the next season's premiere, "The Xindi" and everything in between. It deals with the Xindi probe attack on Earth, to the vengeful Duras, who still wants Archer to pay for his crimes, to the NX-O1's incursion into the Expanse, to the capture of Kessick, the Xindi-Humanoid, and finally, to the Xindi Council, who are aware that Enterprise has entered the Expanse searching for their weapon, in which the Council is so eager to deploy.
"The Expanse" is a really great book. If you haven't seen the episodes "The Expanse" and "The Xindi" then this is one book that you should pick up this holiday season. But, like I said before, if you have seen these two episodes, then, you wouldn't want to waste $12 buying this book.
Was this review helpful to you?
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad for a novelization Nov. 2 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Of course when you read a novelization you have to adjust your expectations. But as far as noveliations go, this isn't too bad. Dilard does add a whole lot to the story that was up on the screen to begin with, but after reading it back-to-back with Diane Carey's novelization of "Broken Bow," I had to appreciate the craftsmanship Dillard brought to the story. It stood in stark contrast to the cynical, quickies cranked out by Carey.
So...don't expect much new (novelizations haven't done much of that since Vonda McIntyre's treatments of TWOK and TSFS), but if you enjoyed the episodes and want to read them in print, this one'll do it for you.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 out of 5 stars  10 reviews
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ST - Enterprise: The Expanse April 30 2004
By Joe Zika - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Star Trek - Enterprise: "The Expanse" a novelization by J.M. Dillard based on the episodes "The Expanse" and "The Xindi" written by Rich Berman and Brannon Braga follows these episodes quite well. I saw the episodes after I read the book and I must say that I enjoyed the book much better.
"The Expanse" starts out with a partial destruction of Earth as seven million people die from Florida, to Cuba, to Venezuela and that a probe from the planet Xindi is to blame. As this probe crashes to Earth, Archer and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC NX-01 are being recalled to Earth and are refitted for a rather gruelling mission.
"The Expanse" has good charater interaction and you get a good feeling that you begin to interact with the crew when reading this book. There is good character involvement between Jonathan Archer and his crew as they are in spacedock around Earth and the interaction to the next mission. As the Enterpise and her crew are coming to Earth they are intercepted by a Suliban ship from the future and yes, who else but Silik is the one to bring Archer aboard his ship to hear "a humanoid" from the future tell Archer what's in store for the Earth.
"The Expanse" moves along quite quickly and you'll find that you've finished the book in short order as the NX-01 is sent to the Delphic Expanse to find the homeworld of the Xindi. The Xindi are a race of 5 different species all of which are intelligent... primate, reptilian, marsupial, insectoid and sea creatures simular to a dolphin. All of the races work together in a government simular to a republic, but they've been tipped as to what happens to their homeworld in 400 years in the future and there is a temporal rift that may occur.
I enjoyed this book as it was a quick read and highly entertaining I gave this book a 4 star rating for its entertainment value and I would suggest that you read the book before you see the episodic television. You'll appreciate the action-adventure much better. All in all, the was an adventure where there is a crisis and Archer must make decissions that will affect the crew and the future of Earth.
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad for a novelization Nov. 2 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Of course when you read a novelization you have to adjust your expectations. But as far as noveliations go, this isn't too bad. Dilard does add a whole lot to the story that was up on the screen to begin with, but after reading it back-to-back with Diane Carey's novelization of "Broken Bow," I had to appreciate the craftsmanship Dillard brought to the story. It stood in stark contrast to the cynical, quickies cranked out by Carey.
So...don't expect much new (novelizations haven't done much of that since Vonda McIntyre's treatments of TWOK and TSFS), but if you enjoyed the episodes and want to read them in print, this one'll do it for you.
6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars If you watched the episodes, the book ruins it. Nov. 28 2003
By "wes_huntington2" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
If you watched the episodes, the book ruins it. J.M. Dillard, the person who wrote Star Trek Generations, Star Trek: First Contact and Star Trek: Insurrection has now written the Star Trek: Enterprise book, "The Expanse."
It tells the story of the second season finale, "The Expanse", and the next season's premiere, "The Xindi" and everything in between. It deals with the Xindi probe attack on Earth, to the vengeful Duras, who still wants Archer to pay for his crimes, to the NX-O1's incursion into the Expanse, to the capture of Kessick, the Xindi-Humanoid, and finally, to the Xindi Council, who are aware that Enterprise has entered the Expanse searching for their weapon, in which the Council is so eager to deploy.
"The Expanse" is a really great book. If you haven't seen the episodes "The Expanse" and "The Xindi" then this is one book that you should pick up this holiday season. But, like I said before, if you have seen these two episodes, then, you wouldn't want to waste $12 buying this book.
3.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't Add Much to the TV Story June 14 2014
By Frank L. Urbano - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
The novelization of 'The Expanse', one of Star Trek: Enterprise's most engaging episodes, is well-written and a faithful take-off on the television episode which bears the same name. The main problem is that the book so closely parallels the episode and the author adds so little other information, that is not terribly satisfying to read. In fact, I was able to read the entire book in just under 3 hours.

It would have been interesting to learn more of the backstory of the Xindi in this novel, as well as other characters introduced. While the novel is emotionally charged at times, and it nicely shows the anguish of some of the characters, it just doesn't hit the mark in expanding upon the fine writing in the TV episode.

If you have time to read this, go ahead. If not, then read one of the non-episode novelizations out there. It will be much more satisfying.
4.0 out of 5 stars Captivating April 17 2014
By AJ - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
I found the story to be great.
I am a big fan of Star Trek Enterprise.
After watching for as long as it ran, I came to know all the characters and this book stays in line.
Of course this was a book on one of the shows, but gave better details.
A little slow in places, but all in all a great story.
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