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The Star Wars Jedi Apprentice #15: The Death Of Hope Paperback – Oct 1 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks (Oct. 1 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0439139341
  • ISBN-13: 978-0439139342
  • Product Dimensions: 19.3 x 13.4 x 1.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 113 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #619,175 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback
The two Jedi Knights Qui-Gon Jinn and Tahl have made to each other a commitment of love. But now that Tahl has been abducted while on a mission on the planet of Apsolon, Qui-Gon will push himself to the limit to rescue her. Qui-Gon is consumed by dark visions, visions foreseeing something terrible about to happen to Tahl. With his apprentice Obi-Wan, Qui-Gon must rescue Tahl before it's too late. But nothing is easy as both enemies and friends may not be trusted because everyone has something to hide...
"The Death of Hope" is the second book of a three book story arc. By far as most people have mentioned, this book is the most sad and touching story. Again the book focuses mostly on Qui-Gon as he struggles to sort out his feelings and to save his loved one. As you continue reading the story, the true sides of both enemies and friends are revealed. It's very confusing as the Jedis have to sort out what is truth and what are lies. I love the story how no one can be trusted and everyone is a suspect. Please be sure to read "The Ties That Bind" before reading this book. Then after reading this, "The Call to Vengeance" on hand since this book ends in a cliffhanger!
This series explains a lot about how Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan first meet. Their beginning is far from simple and all smooth-sailings, which would be pretty monotonous if it was. Though the books are said for ages 9-12, like many other reviewers I agree that the Jedi Apprentice Series are for anybody. Extremely well-written, the emotions, thoughts, and feelings of the main characters are very well put down into words. I also like the different array of humans and aliens which are portrayed, both good and bad.
Plus check out the new Jedi Quest series, dealing with the master and apprentice duo of Obi-Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker.
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By L. DeVaudreuil on Feb. 3 2002
Format: Paperback
When I was reading the book I found myself nodding into sleep from the repetitiveness. It dangerously lacked the unique quality the, well, made me like star wars jedi apprentice. I liked the struggle, the plans, and most of all, the unbreakable friendship. Unfortunatly, it added romance, which dilluted the friendship into a pile of gooshy, mushy "Oh god I love her, don't let her die!" Romeo Juliet stuff that I can't stand. THen it went into the long journey where they rode on land speeders, then they slept, then they rode on land speeders, then they slept, then they rode on land speeders, then they slept, then they rode on land speeders, then they slept, then they rode on land speeders, then they slept, then they rode on land speeders, then they slept, then FINALLY something HAPPPENS (YAY!) After that they rode on land speeders, then they slept, then they rode on land speeders, then they slept, then they rode on land speeders, then they slept, then they rode on land speeders, then they slept, then they rode on land speeders, then they slept, then and FINALLY something else happens! (YAY!)Then they did something I would have never guessed, it was amazing. . . they rode on land speeders, BUT DID'T SLEEP. So know we have a few chapters about how obi-wan was feeling his master slip away and about how d@#! tired he was! Oh that's so much BETTER! GOD! I'm surprised that I even gave a single star! It just wasn't like the first 13. They were awsome. I'd give 'em a 6 if I could BUT this one was one of the WORST books I've EVER read in my entire life(which is saying something) The on;y reason I read it was because I had a little bit of hope left, like a firefly on the dark side of the moon that prayed the moon would turn again and let me gaze in marvel at the glistening sun once more.Read more ›
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By "kandladin" on Nov. 2 2001
Format: Paperback
In spite of the obvious unhappy nature of the plot of this book, it still manages to live up to it's predeccesers as far as plot development and scene description go, and I would say that it even surpasses many of them as far as character development goes. I won't give away the whole book, but basically this book begins almost immediately after Qui-Gon discovered that Tahl had been kidnapped. He and Obi-Wan immediately chase after her captors, their urgency intensified once they realize that the longer they take, the more of a potentially lethal paralyzing drug Balog (Tahl's captor) will pump into her body... Anyway, all else I'll say is that things are NOT what they seem! I noticed some people were irritated that this book focused mostly on Qui-Gon while Obi-Wan faded to the backround. I wonder why this is, since this series has ALWAYS (unlike Young/Junior Jedi Knights and other kiddy Star Wars books) focused almost equally on Obi-Wan (the child) and Qui-Gon (the adult) I always found that to be one of the better aspects of this series, since it provides a wider range of view for the story, and greater oppurtunity for
character development. However, if my fellow Obi-Wan fans would look hard enough, they would see that in fact this book holds more character development for Obi-Wan then ever before. Sure, he gets his leg mashed under a boulder, and messes up a few other times, but where do you think Qui-Gon would have been without Obi-Wan to take up his slack, and take charge of things, and be the master when Qui-Gon's determination to save his beloved gave way to panic? To me, this shows how far he has truly come.
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