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The Steamboat Era In the Muskokas: Volume II: Golden Years to Today Hardcover – Apr 1 1995


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Hardcover, Apr 1 1995
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Boston Mills Press (April 1 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0919783104
  • ISBN-13: 978-0919783102
  • Product Dimensions: 28.5 x 22.4 x 2.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #511,240 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Richard S. Tatley is a member of the Steamboat Historical Society of America and in 1973 helped to found the Muskoka Steamship and Historical Society, which now owns the S.S.Segwun. Richard is the author of several books, including Steamboating in Muskoka and Port Carling: The Hub of the Muskoka Lakes.


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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

This volume explains the colorful history of the steamboat era in the Muskoka region in Ontario from the turn of the century until the last steamboat tied up for the last time in 1958. There are also descriptions and photographs of the many luxury hotels that lined the lake shores and were served by the steamers. The final chapter describes the Segwun, built in 1887 and the lone survivor of the steamboat era, tied up at the Muskoka Wharf in Gravenhurst as a floating museum, rotting away day by day and how, what started out to be only simple repairs just to keep her afloat, turned into a full-fledged restoration project and eventual return to service. Today, she proudly steams on three lakes as the only coal-fired passenger steamer in Canada and the oldest engine-powered vessel in North America. No maritime liberary is complete without this book.
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A valiant effort for a Muskoka cottage coffee table book. However one look at the title almost stopped me from even opening the book to read further. The accuracy was immediately in question. One who is truly familiar with and well researched on the area would know that the region is "Muskoka", not "the Muskokas". Since the author purports to be intimately familiar with the region, he should know this. With regards to the subject, the original diaries of the builder of the Lady of the Lake and the Mink do not support the author's information regarding those two steamships. This leads me to question the general accuracy of the book.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Feb. 26 2001
This area of Ontario name is derived from an Indian Chief. There was only one person so the name can not carry an s. He was a wonderful person and deserves to be honoured. He taught many pioneers how to live in their new home area. Media has sadly slipped into the error of calling the area The Muskokas. It is wrong. Please continue to call it by its correct name. It is Muskoka. Thank you.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A Difinitive Work July 16 1999
By Peter Vander Veld - Published on Amazon.com
This volume explains the colorful history of the steamboat era in the Muskoka region in Ontario from the turn of the century until the last steamboat tied up for the last time in 1958. There are also descriptions and photographs of the many luxury hotels that lined the lake shores and were served by the steamers. The final chapter describes the Segwun, built in 1887 and the lone survivor of the steamboat era, tied up at the Muskoka Wharf in Gravenhurst as a floating museum, rotting away day by day and how, what started out to be only simple repairs just to keep her afloat, turned into a full-fledged restoration project and eventual return to service. Today, she proudly steams on three lakes as the only coal-fired passenger steamer in Canada and the oldest engine-powered vessel in North America. No maritime liberary is complete without this book.
High on my short list of favorites Aug. 10 2008
By Daibhidh - Published on Amazon.com
This volume, and it's volume #1, are truly a surperlative product. They are well researched, and wonderfully printed volumes, and well illustrated with images not found anywhere else. I have a collection of probably over 200 books about paddle steamers all over the world, a favorite subject of mine. Muskoka, Muskokas, who cares, it's about the boats. The people, the area: they are only there to justify steamboats' reason for being. These two books are certainly within my top 10 favorites.
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
.The area is Muskoka. No such thing as The Muskokas Feb. 26 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
This area of Ontario name is derived from an Indian Chief. There was only one person so the name can not carry an s. He was a wonderful person and deserves to be honoured. He taught many pioneers how to live in their new home area. Media has sadly slipped into the error of calling the area The Muskokas. It is wrong. Please continue to call it by its correct name. It is Muskoka. Thank you.


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