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The Story of My Life: The Restored Edition Paperback – Mar 9 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Modern Library; New edition edition (March 9 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812968867
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812968866
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 2.1 x 20.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 318 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #110,523 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

“The greatest woman of our age.”
Winston Churchill

“Helen Keller is fellow to Caesar, Alexander, Napoleon, Homer, Shakespeare, and the rest of the immortals. . . . She will be as famous a thousand years from now as she is today.”
Mark Twain

From the Back Cover

“The greatest woman of our age.”
Winston Churchill

“Helen Keller is fellow to Caesar, Alexander, Napoleon, Homer, Shakespeare, and the rest of the immortals. . . . She will be as famous a thousand years from now as she is today.”
Mark Twain

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It is with a kind of fear that I begin to write the history of my life. Read the first page
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Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By doctor_beth on May 3 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is a beautiful 100th year anniversary edition of Helen Keller's The Story of My Life, originally published in 1903. In his introduction, editor James Berger stresses the importance of offering Helen Keller's text in its original form, but he has greatly enhanced the original story by including additional background information, a section of Keller's own letters from the age of eight, and finally, commentaries on Keller's personality, education, speech, and style written by Annie Sullivan and others.
Although Helen Keller's story is familiar to all, to read it described in her own words is even more compelling. Using wonderful, descriptive prose, Keller does a masterful job of depicting her transformation into a sentient being after the arrival of her teacher, Annie Sullivan. Of particular note is Keller's frequent use of sight-oriented language (e.g., "very soon the green, pointed buds showed signs of opening") despite her disabilities. Although Keller tells of several dark periods in her life--including the "Frost King" incident and her struggles at college--what shines through most clearly is her incredible optimism and unfailingly cheerful disposition.
As amazing as it is to read Keller's story in her own words, it is her letters which leave the reader feeling truly astonished. Just three and a half months after Sullivan first arrived to teach Helen, Keller was able to write simple declaratory statements such as "helen write anna george will give helen apple." The progression of Keller's language is truly extraordinary; just five months later, she is writing nearly as well as--or perhaps better than--other children her age: "I am glad to write you a letter. Father will send you a picture.
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By Sverre Svendsen TOP 500 REVIEWER on Nov. 7 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Here we have the most complete and comprehensive volume illuminating the childhood and youth of Helen Keller in a revised edition of the original 1903 publication. It is divided into three main sections: 1. Keller's early autobiography "The Story of My Life"; 2. Letters written by her and to her 1887-1901; 3. A supplementary account of Keller, principally by her teacher Annie Sullivan.

This book is definitely one that will interest anyone who is related to or works with the deaf and or blind. It contains a great deal of detail about how someone who is so shut out from being able to learn by hearing and observation can be taught to understand, to reason and to feel. What Sullivan and others managed to accomplish with Keller is incredible. What Keller herself accomplished when given the right instruction and communicative tools is even more incredible.

As for "The Story of My Life," written by Keller--if judged strictly by literary merit--although it was a phenomenal accomplishment by a deaf and blind woman--it is not a great piece of literature. Her composition is abundantly verbose, flowery and ostentatious, at times to the point of tedium. But it is certainly the work of a genius and holds the reader's interest because of the seeming impossibility of its actual accomplishment. This book is the cat's miaou for Keller completists, educators and historians. General readers who are looking for an honest biographical account of Keller's extraordinary life--including how she was duly aided and assisted but also unduly manipulated and influenced by others--would be advised to read Dorothy Herrmann's "Helen Keller: A Life."
Helen Keller: A Life
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Deaf and blind, she had learned language, and so well that she graduated cum laude with B.A in English from Radcliffe. Helen’s father, Arthur H. Keller, was a captain in the Confederate Army.
See the magnitude of Helen’s accomplishments in the face of her disabilities. When she was a baby, an illness deprived her of her sight and hearing: acute congestion of the stomach and brain caused high fever. When the fever vanished mysteriously, everybody rejoiced. Nobody knew then that Helen should never see or hear again.
They all learned the finger alphabet to communicate with her. She shared her experience through the eyes, ears and language of others, and wrote fourteen books.
Read Helen’s memoir and letters. Also, letters written 1887-1894 by her dedicated teacher, Anne Sullivan;
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
63 of 63 people found the following review helpful
A wonderful restoration of a remarkable story May 3 2004
By doctor_beth - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is a beautiful 100th year anniversary edition of Helen Keller's The Story of My Life, originally published in 1903. In his introduction, editor James Berger stresses the importance of offering Helen Keller's text in its original form, but he has greatly enhanced the original story by including additional background information, a section of Keller's own letters from the age of eight, and finally, commentaries on Keller's personality, education, speech, and style written by Annie Sullivan and others.
Although Helen Keller's story is familiar to all, to read it described in her own words is even more compelling. Using wonderful, descriptive prose, Keller does a masterful job of depicting her transformation into a sentient being after the arrival of her teacher, Annie Sullivan. Of particular note is Keller's frequent use of sight-oriented language (e.g., "very soon the green, pointed buds showed signs of opening") despite her disabilities. Although Keller tells of several dark periods in her life--including the "Frost King" incident and her struggles at college--what shines through most clearly is her incredible optimism and unfailingly cheerful disposition.
As amazing as it is to read Keller's story in her own words, it is her letters which leave the reader feeling truly astonished. Just three and a half months after Sullivan first arrived to teach Helen, Keller was able to write simple declaratory statements such as "helen write anna george will give helen apple." The progression of Keller's language is truly extraordinary; just five months later, she is writing nearly as well as--or perhaps better than--other children her age: "I am glad to write you a letter. Father will send you a picture." Soon it is nearly impossible to believe that this young woman spent her first eight years without thought or speech. Included within Keller's letters are some of the replies she received from her many famous friends, such as the poet John Whittier.
Following Keller's letters are supplementary accounts from various sources, most notably the letters of Annie Sullivan. My one complaint about the book is that I wish these letters had been printed side-by-side with Keller's; it would have been truly captivating to read the accounts of pupil and teacher in tandem. Still, Sullivan's accounts are appealing in their own right, and her life's dedication to her student was truly remarkable. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone wanting to get the clearest, most true account of one of the 20th century's most fascinating women, Helen Keller.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Very enjoyable reading! March 3 2010
By Carolyn C - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have thought about getting this book for a long, long time and I am thoroughly enjoying it. The most amazing thing about it is that this little deaf/blind girl not only learned to communitcate but she speaks several different languages! Included are Helen's actual letters written from the time she was a child. I absolutely recommend this book for all ages!
The book came within one week of ordering, and looked brand new.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A Remarkable Person Sept. 2 2011
By Vallen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have had a nearly life-long interest in this remarkable person, and purchased this volume to get more of an inside look at her life from her own point of view. At Chapter Six, I find it difficult to continue reading, but feel I must. She tells her story well enough, as facts go, but her writing style I find to be just matter-of-fact and somewhat bland (and a bit of a snooze fest). So far, I have read out of compulsion and the desire for knowledge rather than for the entertainment value. I will eventually finish the book, hoping it will become more interesting and entertaining as it progresses. At this point, I would compare it to a facts-only documentary, without much flavor. Perhaps, as her skill develops throughout this bio, the story will become more enhanced. I think a ghost writer would probabaly have composed a more "flavorful" narrative. Nonetheless, it is the true life story of an important and very courageous person from her own viewpoint, and something with which we should all be familiar. There are several other books about the life of Helen Keller which are readily available at Amazon.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Person of the Century March 26 2007
By Gary W. Shields - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
My vote of many others who believe Helen Keller was Person of the Century. She was an incredible human being. Personified what should be the "Human Spirit".
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Restored? Abridged, actually... Feb. 7 2012
By bleary in NYC - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book advertises itself as a "restored" edition, but the text is the same as that of the first edition. Except that it's abridged significantly. Nothing has been restored that wasn't already available, and quite a bit has in fact taken out.


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