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The Stranger [School & Library Binding]

Albert Camus
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (295 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 26.77
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Book Description

March 1 1989 0881032476 978-0881032475
Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. Hesperides Press are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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The Stranger + The Myth of Sisyphus: And Other Essays + Plague, The
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Review

The Stranger is a strikingly modern text and Matthew Ward’s translation will enable readers to appreciate why Camus’s stoical anti-hero and ­devious narrator remains one of the key expressions of a postwar Western malaise, and one of the cleverest exponents of a literature of ambiguity.” –from the Introduction by Peter Dunwoodie --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description

Patrick McCarthy places The Stranger in the context of a French and French-Algerian history and culture, examines the way the work undermines traditional concepts of fiction, and explores the parallels (and more importantly the contrasts) between Camus and Sartre. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Existentialism Embodied in Fiction April 9 2004
Format:Hardcover
The Stranger, or L'Etranger, has indeed been a staple of high school literature classes in the West for a very long time, and for good reason. Its main character, Meursault, is a young man with quite a blasé attitude toward the trivial things in life and is generally disinterested with the contrived conformities that society imposes on people. Even-keeled and even affable, Meursault enjoys interaction with people a great deal; in fact, he thrives on it. But since he sees all things as mere absurdities, he bores with the things of this life very easily. This is a guy who's truly detached from his emotions; as such, he has difficulty feeling, expressing, or even identifying the existence of emotion within himself. Seen through his eyes, there is no grand purpose in life. There is just existence and the experiencing of that existence. He has passion for nothing and lacks convictions of any kind. Regardless of what occurs in his life, "It's all the same to me" he says. In today's Western culture, Meursault would almost certainly be categorized as having been afflicted with Dysthymia, a condition whose effects are known all too well by many young people.
The Stranger begins as Meursault hears word of his mother's death. He makes plans to go to the home for senior citizens where she had lived for a few years to fulfill the duty of attending her burial. Meursault is noticeably lacking any feeling one way or another about his mother's death, and he is generally disinterested with the whole affair, more or less pressing through it begrudgingly. Unbeknownst to him, this lack of sympathy will actually come back to haunt him and ends up contributing to his demise. When Meursault returns home from the funeral procession, he continues to live moment-to-moment as he always has.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
I have read many of the 284 reviews written before mine, and feel it is important that readers understand what it is that they are reading.
First, and foremost, Camus is an existentialist. As the Encyclopædia Britannica states "...Existentialism does not leave man with nothing to do. Once the nullity of the existential possibilities is recognized, man cannot but resign himself to Being, which, in one of its new manifestations in the world or beyond it, conducts him to a new epoch." Thus in its most basic form existentialism is an investigation into Being--how one lives--how one should live.
Second, "The Stranger" is not written as Camus sees life, but rather as a critique against his contemporaries, e.g Jean-Paul Sartre, many of whom see life as absurd or pointless. Do not mistake Meursault's unemotional amoral living as the "Being" of Camus. Why would Camus argue for such an absurdity when he argues against suicide in "The Myth of Sisyphus"? (Sisyphus living perhaps the most absurd of all existences.)
Third, and final, Matthew Ward's translation is superb. Do not be misled by other reviewers that have perhaps not compared translations side by side--Mr. Ward's translation is true to the style of the original--a TRANSLATION rather than a TRANSLITERATION.
In conclusion, if one approaches this translation of "The Stranger" with an understanding of existentialism, Camus, and the translation, I believe a full appreciation for this philosophical masterpiece will be gained.
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5.0 out of 5 stars On time and in good shape Dec 22 2011
By Wam
Format:Hardcover
Very happy with the delivery. Exactly what I ordered. The book matches with the picture, is in good shape and was delivered on time. :)
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5.0 out of 5 stars A middle school reader June 15 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This book opend my eyes to other peoples ways of showing emotions and their troubles in life. The main character is a Arab named Monisuer Mersault. He does not show his emtions with his face or actions he keeps them inside. At the begging his maman dies. Later as the book evolves he finds a girlfriend and on a weekend trip with her he murders another Arab. He had been getting in with the wrong group of people. When he murderd the person he was feeling threatend by a group of Arabs with knifes. Mersault felt like it was the only thing he could do to save his life. While on jail trial they used the fact that he does not feel emtions and did not mourn at his mothers funeral against him. He was proven guilty and to find out his punishment you have to read the book!
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5.0 out of 5 stars a middle school reader June 15 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This book opend my eyes to other peoples ways of showing emotions and their troubles in life. The main character is a Arab named Monisuer Mersault. He does not show his emtions with his face or actions he keeps them inside. At the begging his maman dies. Later as the book evolves he finds a girlfriend and on a weekend trip with her he murders another Arab. He had been getting in with the wrong group of people. When he murderd the person he was feeling threatend by a group of Arabs with knifes. Mersault felt like it was the only thing he could do to save his life. While on jail trial they used the fact that he does not feel emtions and did not mourn at his mothers funeral against him. He was proven guilty and to find out his punishment you have to read the book!
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5.0 out of 5 stars An existentialist tour de force of literature Jan. 5 2003
By Daniel Jolley TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
The Stranger is a haunting, challenging masterpiece of literature. While it is fiction, it actually manages to express the complex concepts and themes of existential philosophy better than the movement's most noted philosophical writings and almost as well as Dostoyevsky's Notes From the Underground. This is a new kind of literature. The story in and of itself is rather simple, but the glimpses into the intellect and feelings of the protagonist are the sources of the magic of this novel. M.Meursault is a normal man in Algiers, France. When we meet him, he is on the way to his mother's funeral, where he says very little, expresses no remorse over her death, and immediately returns home. The next day, he goes swimming, meets Marie, takes her to see a comedy that night, and spends the next few weeks living his normal life and occassionally seeing Marie. He ends up getting indirectly involved in a dispute between his neighbor Raymond and a girl who did him wrong, and the conflict culminates in an encounter on the beach between Raymond, Meursault, and the girl's Arab brother and friend. Raymond is cut with a knife, but the whole episode seems to be resolved. Meursault, though, decides later to take another walk on the beach because he is too worn out to go inside and rejoin his friends, and somewhat inexplicably he ends up killing one of the Arabs. The second half of the novel examines Meursault's thoughts in relation to his trial and sentence; interestingly, he is prosecuted as much if not more for his moral character than for the crime of murder itself.

Basically, Meursault does not care about anything, does not feel anything for anyone (including himself, for the most part).
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Most recent customer reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars I just can't get into Existentialism
If I had to sum a book up in one word, I would choose "curious." It's entirely unsatisfying as far as novels go, but one could argue that that's part of its appeal. Read more
Published on May 10 2008 by The Rogue Ninja
3.0 out of 5 stars I DONT KNOW MY TITRE
this book is a good one. IT is split into 2 parts , first part being excellent, 2nd part drags; however, the book in'nt complete without it. Read more
Published on July 14 2005
1.0 out of 5 stars What Metaphor?
Existentialism?
---------------
I don't understand how this book can be considered existentialist. What is the existential crisis Meursault faces? Read more
Published on July 11 2003 by "dec10"
4.0 out of 5 stars not bad
the story is interesting, but it sometimes boring.
it's about the absurdity of the life.
read it in french , it's better.
Published on June 25 2003 by H. Georges
5.0 out of 5 stars Absurd does not Equal Existential
To say that this is an existential work proves that you are an intellectual half-wit and know nothing of the life of Camus or his work. Read more
Published on June 17 2003 by J. Moon
1.0 out of 5 stars terrible
why are we forced to read this GARBAGE in high school? this book was terrible. i really felt like jumping in the book and slappin' that guy around a bit. Read more
Published on May 29 2002 by D. Dubei
4.0 out of 5 stars Damn...my face is falling off...
This book was nuts. This guy was so cold hearted and completly...a strager...even to his friends. He was so cold that it almost even made to this book boring. Read more
Published on May 14 2002 by Joey-OFM
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