Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Swordsman's Oath : The Second Tale of Einarinn Mass Market Paperback – 2000


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 2.06 CDN$ 0.01

Best Canadian Books of 2014
Stone Mattress is our #1 Canadian pick for 2014. See all


Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager (2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061020370
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061020377
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2.8 x 17.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 227 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,992,855 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a fantastic sequel that doesn't let down the audience from the first book. The story is even more interesting, as it switches from the past to the present. I don't want to give too many details here, but the new developments are really interesting.
As usual, once you start reading, you'll find it hard to stop. The pace quickens at a tolerable level, to a point near the end where you will find yourself reading late into the night, or forgetting that your lunch hour is only an hour.
The characters are as rooted in reality as always. McKenna does an excellent job writing from the point of view of a man as she did for Livak. This book is written from Ryshad's perspective, though Livak does appear in the book as well.
If you're tired of the fantasy genre, you'll probably still enjoy this book. The characters aren't necessarily heroic. Like most of us, they have reasons for what they do - even the villains. The best thing about McKenna's writing is the reality she infuses into the characters - the way they swear, have sex, joke, and love one another. It feels like real life, and it truly reflects the 'commoner' status that her characters have. Unlike most fantasy novels, these are not princes and princesses, or noble knights. She writes about a maidservant turned expert gambler, a craftsmen's son that signs up in the service of a lord.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Swordsman's Oath picks up the tale of trying to deal with the Elietimm from the Ice Islands, in the Spring after the action in The Thief's Gamble. This book centres on Ryshad, a sworn man for one of the mainland Lords, who first appeared about half way through The Thief's Gamble.
Juliet McKenna has an unusual style in this series, the 'focus character' is told in the first person, and the surrounding characters in the third person. In The Thief's Gamble the first person viewpoint was Livak, a thief and gambler, but in the Swordsman's Oath the viewpoint has switched to Ryshad. This is initially disconcerting, especially in scenes with Livak, but I soon settled into enjoying this book. While The Thief's Gamble was good, The Swordsman's Oath is better and Juliet McKenna has clearly matured as a writer.
In The Swordsman's Oath the reason why some old family treasures have some strange properties are fully explored in a very entertaining story, which has its roots hundreds of years in the past. More is also learnt about the Ice Islanders strengths and about possible methods for combating them, but there is definitely no easy answer.
Juliet McKenna writes some very convincing characters, and then puts them in some truly testing situations. Some of the things she does to Ryshad really shouldn't happen to any self respecting warrior. I was also pleased to notice that a secondary character, who first appears in Thief's Gamble, happens to be gay. It doesn't have any bearing on the story, it is just the way he is. This is a pleasing matter for the fantasy genre, where gay characters are relatively rare, and where gayness is far too often the signal for villainy.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
After orienting myself with the switch in the first person character, I found this book thoroughly engrossing. My attention was captured and retained in the first book, The Theif's Gamble, and I was definitely entertained with the strong character of Livak. However, I found this book even more riveting than the first and look forward to what McKenna will do if there indeed is another book in this series as it seems was set up. These books are entertaining and not too far fetched, given the allowance of magic in her world. McKenna has created an avid and thorough history and proves her forethought into this with the multiple letters and passages she provides at the start of each chapter. I highly recommend both books and, if you have only read the first, urge continuance into the intricacies woven in the next chapter of the series.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Mark Chrisco on March 9 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I've had this book for over a year and after several stops and starts, finally finished. The bottom line is "The Swordsman's Oath" is just not as good as the previous novel in the series. I liked the story and the characters, who really seem to live and breathe, but Juliet McKenna really has overwritten the narrative this time around. The 500+ page book would have been greatly improved by the editing of 50-75 pages of unnessary detail. On the positive side, the author really knows how to write for character, especially Ryshad this time around. Every one appearing along the way is fully realized and three dimensional. It seems this book has introduced more than a few characters who may be major players in future volumes. So, not as good does not mean bad, only more...challenging than what has past. Recommended.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Mark Chrisco on March 9 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I've had this book for over a year and after several stops and starts, finally finished. The bottom line is "The Swordsman's Oath" is just not as good as the previous novel in the series. I liked the story and the characters, who really seem to live and breathe, but Juliet McKenna really has overwritten the narrative this time around. The 500+ page book would have been greatly improved by the editing of 50-75 pages of unnessary detail. On the positive side, the author really knows how to write for character, especially Ryshad this time around. Every one appearing along the way is fully realized and three dimensional. It seems this book has introduced more than a few characters who may be major players in future volumes. So, not as good does not mean bad, only more...challenging than what has past. Recommended.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback