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Product Details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Tantor Media; Unabridged edition (Sept. 1 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1400150566
  • ISBN-13: 978-1400150564
  • Product Dimensions: 13.6 x 1.4 x 19.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 104 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Product Description

From the Publisher

This book is a standard print version using a minimum of 10 point type in a 6 by 9 inch size and library bound. As with all Quiet Vision print books, it use a high grade, acid free paper for long life. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

John Taliaferro is the author of ""Tarzan Forever: The Life of Edgar Rice Burroughs,"" ""Creator of Tarzan"" and ""Great White Fathers: The Story of the Obsessive Quest to Create Mount Rushmore,"" He lives in Texas and Montana.

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Format: Hardcover
The Son of Tarzan deserves a strong 4 star rating. While the story shares a lot in common with much of Burroughs' early Tarzan material, isn't that why you like the Tarzan series? The Son of Tarzan also stands out among the early Tarzan series for its excellent characterization. The book's best feature is the relationship that evolves between Tarzan's son Korak and the kidnapped French girl, Meriem. It is much more satisfactory than the Tarzan and Jane relationship, which really fizzles after the first couple of Tarzan books. The reader sympathizes with Meriem from the onset of the story. Burroughs patiently develops her character throughout the book, creating an appealing feminine presence. The reader also sympathizes with Korak, who proves to be more than just a "Tarzan Jr." While the two share certain similarities, Korak is his own man whose ultimate fate hangs in the balance until the very end of the novel.

Alongside these two strong leading characters, Burroughs works in a number of foes that add significant interest to the plot. The character of Baynes is the most interesting among these, and the reader will appreciate how Burroughs expands his role. The plot does not get overly complicated, nor is the reader buried under an avalanche of endless characters. By the end of the book, Burroughs is able to tie up all the loose ends that he has created.

There is a certain amount of predictability, and Burroughs is unsuccessful in his attempt to cloak the identities of the "Big Bwana" and "My Dear." This does not greatly detract from the overall book, though. I found that the book's pace gained momentum as the story progressed, and found the conclusion to be very satisfactory.
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By Dave_42 TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Aug. 15 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As with the previous books in the series, "The Son of Tarzan" by Edgar Rice Burroughs is an improvement over the installments which came before. Originally published as a 6-part serial between December 4th, 1915 and January 8th, 1916, "The Son of Tarzan" introduces Tarzan's son Jack (a.k.a. Korak) as a major character, as well as his wife Meriem.

The improvements are obvious over the earlier books, the plot is less transparent and more involved, and the dangers facing our heroes are a wider variety and thus there is much less repetition in the story. The weaknesses are still significant though as the unbelievable coincidences still occur much too often, and when Jack disappears the reaction of Tarzan and Jane is absent, and thus the reunion later on lacks any kind of feeling as the reader never is made aware of any steps made by the parents to find their son.

Burroughs for once doesn't use a single main villain throughout the story, and this is another significant improvement in the story. Instead Alexis Paulvitch starts as the foil, but he is out of the story relatively early as many other factors come into play which lead the story in the direction it takes, and the characters one faces are not quite as two-dimensional as they are in the previous books in the series, though they still are not fully-defined.

Despite its problems, the Tarzan series remains an entertaining one, especially those who enjoy action and adventure. "The Son of Tarzan" in my opinion is the best in the series up to this point, though it does create some problems later with the timeline of other stories, and I would also say that the Barsoom series after its first four novels was the better of the two series. Clearly, though, Tarzan triumphs as far as history is concerned, as he is an iconic figure in fiction while John Carter is remembered only by Burroughs' fans.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 58 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Like Father, Like Son April 22 2011
By Aarwin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This, the third book in the Tarzan series, is one of my favorites. Tricked by one of Tarzan's arch-enemies into running away from home, Tarzan's son Jack finds himself banished to the deep jungle with only Akut, the giant age as a companion. As time goes by, Jack learns to cope with the jungle and transforms into Korak, a jungle lord who converses with apes and rides Tantor the bull elephant. Korak rescues a little Arab girl with a hidden background, and the two young people become fast companions of the wild. The action is constant, the plot convoluted but typical of the Tarzan series with never a dull moment. My only objection is the ending of the book. All is, of course, resolved, but it is so quickly done one cannot help wondering if Burroughs was up against a deadline. Nevertheless, it is quick, good reading!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A sequel that is as good as the original Aug. 30 2003
By Michael S. Armstrong - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The Son of Tarzan deserves a strong 4 star rating. While the story shares a lot in common with much of Burroughs' early Tarzan material, isn't that why you like the Tarzan series? The Son of Tarzan also stands out among the early Tarzan series for its excellent characterization. The book's best feature is the relationship that evolves between Tarzan's son Korak and the kidnapped French girl, Meriem. It is much more satisfactory than the Tarzan and Jane relationship, which really fizzles after the first couple of Tarzan books. The reader sympathizes with Meriem from the onset of the story. Burroughs patiently develops her character throughout the book, creating an appealing feminine presence. The reader also sympathizes with Korak, who proves to be more than just a "Tarzan Jr." While the two share certain similarities, Korak is his own man whose ultimate fate hangs in the balance until the very end of the novel.

Alongside these two strong leading characters, Burroughs works in a number of foes that add significant interest to the plot. The character of Baynes is the most interesting among these, and the reader will appreciate how Burroughs expands his role. The plot does not get overly complicated, nor is the reader buried under an avalanche of endless characters. By the end of the book, Burroughs is able to tie up all the loose ends that he has created.

There is a certain amount of predictability, and Burroughs is unsuccessful in his attempt to cloak the identities of the "Big Bwana" and "My Dear." This does not greatly detract from the overall book, though. I found that the book's pace gained momentum as the story progressed, and found the conclusion to be very satisfactory. It is not a conclusion that merely baits the reader into buying the next edition, unlike the present "Lord of the Rings" movie saga, for instance. It stands on its own.

The 1917 version that includes many outstanding illustrations by J. Allen St. John is the best way to go on this one. St. John's only lapses are his inability to capture Meriem in "civilized" garb, the illustration in which Tarzan looks like a skinny 90-year old man, and the bizarre, strangely proportioned Quasimodo-ish picture of Baynes fighting the black. Aside from these glaring exceptions, his work is top-notch.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
More Tarzan!!! May 4 2013
By maria benson - Published on Amazon.com
I bought the first few Tarzan books for my son. He loves them. He hasn't started reading this one yet, but I can't wait. I am so excited he's reading so much. The Son of Tarzan by Edgar Rice Burroughs.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Like swinging through the trees with the Ape Man's son while holding onto the vine for dear life. Oct. 23 2012
By H. S. Wedekind - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
SON OF TARZAN is the most action-packed, breathless adventure story of the four books in the Tarzan series I've read thus far. John Clayton, Jr, aka Korak "The Killer," leaps, literally, out of his bedroom window at the Greystoke manse and into a new world of danger, narrow escapes, and love.

There are so many twists and turns and incredible coincidences in this book, that you'll be forced to turn the pages as quickly as you can to keep up. And if you think, like I did before reading SON OF TARZAN, that Little (Future) Lord Greystoke would be like the child actor who played the part of "Boy" in those old Johnny Weismuller movies, you'll be thoroughly surprised that he is just as savage as his father was. Adopted by the Great Apes, he is given the name of Korak, which in ape grunt, means "The Killer." And a killer he definitely is.

You'll also be charmed by the little girl Korak rescues from her mean and brutal Arab father The Sheik. Meriem is her name, and she is one tough girl. She is also a character who grows up before your eyes and you'll take her to heart as she suffers loneliness, abuse, and a broken heart before and after she is saved from a fate worse than death by Korak.

I enjoyed this book very much and highly recommend it. 5 Stars
Getting better each novel Oct. 14 2014
By mshockle - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was a tad disappointed in the circumstantial nature which Burroughs utilized in his writing but this novel has finally sold me to its utility. Plot twists and surprises in novel got me in way that seems only obvious once revealed though the ending was a bit too giddy and whimsical in my estimation. Will definitely continue these adventures and I'd recommend the series to all ages.


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