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The Technology of Orgasm: "Hysteria," the Vibrator, and Women's Sexual Satisfaction Hardcover – Dec 18 1998


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Hopkins Fulfillment Service (Dec 18 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801859417
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801859410
  • Product Dimensions: 21.8 x 14.2 x 2.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 408 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #685,964 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
In 1653 Pieter van Foreest, called Alemarianus Petrus Forestus, published a medical compendium titled Observationem et Carationem Medicinalium ac Chirurgicarum opera Omnia, with chapter on the diseases of women. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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4.6 out of 5 stars
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jessica Jernigan on Aug. 1 2002
Format: Paperback
for centuries, troubled -- or troubling -- women were diagnosed with "hysteria." the classic treatment for this vague malady was inducement of the "hysteric paroxysm" -- known to us contemporary types as the orgasm. according to rachel maines's wryly hilarious history, the first mechanical vibrators were labor-saving devices for doctors tired of inducing orgasm in their patients manually. who knew? this book is clearly her dissertation & primarily intended for academics, but i found it mind-blowing & frequently quite amusing. i frequently recommend it to friends & colleagues looking for a quick, smart, engaging read.
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By A Customer on Sept. 25 2002
Format: Paperback
This book is utterly fascinating! Written by a woman who's really done her homework on the subject, The Technology of Orgasm proves to be a captivating historical account of the evolution of society's perceptions of women's sexuality. It's a must-read for a woman who's confident in her sexuality, or would like to become more so.
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By "bahlul" on May 31 2002
Format: Hardcover
Firstly let me say I enjoyed and recommend this book, yet
have taken issue with some of the opinions expressed as if
they are fact.
Well I guess that is the way people write, but take for example, on page 5 of this book the author writes: "The
androcentric definition of sex as an activity recognizes
three essential steps: preparation for penetration
("foreplay"), penetration, and male orgasism."
That is not an androcentric definition of sex,
that is the procreational definition of sex. I do wish
historians could lay off the conspiracy theory, as
there is too much of it running like a theoretical flaw
throughout this book. In an age where effective
contraception is routine, many men and women blithely and
conveniently forgetting the historical roots of intercourse.
It is like people in the city do occasionally naively forget where bottled milk comes from.
The passage continues
"Sexual activity that does not involve at least the last two
has not been popularly or medically (and for that matter
legally) regarded as "the real thing."
There is the rub. Of course it is not regarded as the real
thing, as without it there is no chance of procreation. Surprise
surprise, sex is actually in reality about procreation in
the final analysis. Otherwise it becomes a mere example of
persistent human sensual trivia in the grand scheme of
things, and is moving away from actual sex into merely 'having orgasisms' --- which is a different thing.
But instead the survival of human race actually depends on
the 'real thing' and that is for better or worse the reality of it.
Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
If everyone over the age of 12 read this book, along with "Are we Having Fun Yet: The Intelligent Woman's Guide to Sex," the world would be an eminently more exciting, passionate place for both sexes (including men who have previously have had unresponsive partners).
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Format: Paperback
This is extremely interesting read, often quite hillarious and hard to beleive (or maybe not - not the first and not the last time that medical profession overlooks the obvious and displays extreme ignorance on human, especially female, body). However, I didn't like author's attitude that a woman cannot have an orgasm without clitoral stimulation. This may, unfortunately, be true for some women, but my own experience tells me that this is not entirely true, and that there are many ways to achieve orgasms, and none of them should be considered inferior to other ways.
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Format: Hardcover
Anyone who reads social histories, biographies of Victorian women or historical fiction must eventually ask this question, "What the heck is neurasthenia and how come nobody ever gets it anymore?" The plague of wealthy Victorian women simply disappeared without a trace in the 1920s. Why? Finally -- here's your answer.
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By A Customer on March 28 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book is indeed a hoot. The idea that early 20th century medical doctors could not tell that they were stimulating their patients to orgasm is astonishing, until the reader progresses through more of the book. The book is not about conception--it's about female orgasm, which is not directly related to conception (and can be easily achieved with no penetration at all). The androcentric bias the author mentions pertains, for example, to the writers of sex manuals in past decades who counseled men not to bother bringing their partners to orgasm, and counseled women not to demand orgasm, because concentrating on "her pleasure" (as the condom boxes say) can be distracting for the male partner. THAT advice is androcentric, and a major point of this book.
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