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The Time Machine (Enriched Classics)
 
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The Time Machine (Enriched Classics) [Kindle Edition]

H.G. Wells
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (186 customer reviews)

Print List Price: CDN$ 4.24
Kindle Price: CDN$ 0.00 includes free international wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
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Sold by: Simon & Schuster Canada, Inc.
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Product Description

From School Library Journal

Grades 4-7--The St. Charles Players perform this readers' theatre-style rendition of H.G. Wells' classic story. Using appropriate sound effects and alternating readers allows listeners to differentiate between characters and to develop a sense of place and time. The lively narration will hold listeners' attention from beginning to end. The story begins with a revolutionary Victorian scientist who claims to have invented a machine that allows him to travel through time. Using flashbacks, he recounts his adventures in the futurist world he visits in his time machine to a group of skeptical friends. This abridged version will work well as an introduction to classic literature in elementary grade classes, but omits too much of the original text for older students. Consider adding this title to audiobook collections that focus on classic, time-tested literature.
Sarah Prielipp, Chippewa River District Library System, Mt Pleasant, MI
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Review

Michael York is excellent as the Time Traveler, this classic can truly be enjoyed by listeners of all ages. -- KLIATT

Michael York is excellent in this full cast production. This classic can truly be enjoyed by listeners of all ages. -- KLIATT review magazine, May 2000

Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2246 KB
  • Print Length: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Atria Books; Enriched Classic edition (May 31 2011)
  • Sold by: Simon & Schuster Canada, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743487737
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743487733
  • ASIN: B004XVQ73G
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (186 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #222 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
By bernie TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
An unnamed time traveler sees the future of man (802,701 A.D.) and then the inevitable future of the world. He tells his tale in detail.

I grew up on the Rod Taylor /George Pal movie. When I started the book I expected it to be slightly different with a tad more complexity as with most book/movie relationships. I was surprised to find the reason for the breakup of species (Morlock and Eloi) was class Vs atomic (in later movie versions it was political). I could live with that but to find that some little pink thing replaced Yvette Mimieux was too munch.

After all the surprises we can look at the story as unique in its time, first published in 1895, yet the message is timeless. The writing and timing could not have been better. And the ending was certainly appropriate for the world that he describes. Possibly if the story were written today the species division would be based on eugenics.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Start of Something Special Sept. 14 2010
By Dave_42 TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
In any discussion of the history of Science Fiction, H. G. (Herbert George) Wells is sure to be mentioned, and "The Time Machine" is the first of his novels/novellas. Wells may not have invented the genre, but his impact on it would be difficult to overstate. Unlike Verne, Wells was able to go beyond just what could be accomplished by science currently, and the invention of a Time Machine is central to the story Wells is telling. That is not to say that he has nothing to say on current sciences as well, just that he allows stories to take readers far beyond that which Verne would allow.

The history of "The Time Machine" is an unusual one. Wells had used the subject of time travel repeatedly starting in 1888 with his incomplete serial "The Chronic Argonauts". It next took form in a series of articles published in "The National Observer" in 1894, and then finally as a serial novel in "The New Review" in early 1895 when editor W. E. Henley moved from one publication to the other at the end of 1894 and convinced Wells to write it as a serial for his new publication.

The story itself is quite unusual as well. Wells refrains from naming the Time Traveler at all, and the narrator also remains nameless except one reference to a person named Hillyer in the final chapter before the Epilogue, which apparently refers to him. The only major character whose name is repeatedly used is Weena, the childlike woman whom the Time Traveler meets in the year 802,701 A.D. Though Verne would have considered the Time Machine a cheat, i.e. non-scientific, Wells does include other bits and pieces of science in the telling of this tale and there is a point he is making about science as well.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By bernie TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
An unnamed time traveler sees the future of man (802,701 A.D.) and then the inevitable future of the world. He tells his tale in detail.

I grew up on the Rod Taylor /George Pal movie. When I started the book I expected it to be slightly different with a tad more complexity as with most book/movie relationships. I was surprised to find the reason for the breakup of species (Morlock and Eloi) was class Vs atomic (in later movie versions it was political). I could live with that but to find that some little pink thing replaced Yvette Mimieux was too munch.

After al the surprises we can look at the story as unique in its time, first published in 1895, yet the message is timeless. The writing and timing could not have been better. And the ending was certainly appropriate for the world that he describes. Possibly if the story were written today the species division would be based on eugenics.
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Time Machine July 20 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells depeicts the story of a man known as the time traveler who travels into the distant future with a time machine that he creates.
I enjoyed this book pretty well, it is quite short and a quick read. The story is told through the voice of a man who is visiting the time travalers house at one of his many dinner parties. The entire book is written in first person. All and all a good book and an interesting view on what future lies ahead as told in the late 19th century.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating! July 7 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This is the story of an inventor that travels to the distant future in hopes of seeing how advanced humankind has become.
Instead, he finds humanity divided into two separate but interdependent species. There are the peaceful, beautiful, indolent, and fairly stupid Eloi who live a life of ease in a surface garden where they await being summoned by the Morlocks who are ugly, brutish, and cannibalistic. The Morlocks live underground where they run machines and just about everything else as well.
Ignorant of the Morlocks, the inventor make the acquaintance of an Eloi woman named Weena and, typical of the 19th-century male, finds her lack of actual intelligence rather endearing and falls in love with her. She shows him through the ruins of all that remains of his ancient world. There seems to have been a nuclear war, which is interesting, since this book was written in the 19th, NOT the 20th century.
When the Morlocks introduce themselves to the inventor by stealing his time machine, he must set about to rescue both himself and the Eloi....
The only reason I give this old favorite of mine 4 stars instead of 5 is for the often old-fashioned language that, though fast-paced for a Victorian novel, is still sometimes rather heavy in places. Yet the wonderful story more than redeems itself.
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Most recent customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars I saw the movie first. The book difference was a surprise.
An unnamed time traveler sees the future of man (802,701 A.D.) and then the inevitable future of the world. He tells his tale in detail. Read more
Published on Sept. 23 2010 by bernie
5.0 out of 5 stars I saw the movie first. The book difference was a surprise.
An unnamed time traveler sees the future of man (802,701 A.D.) and then the inevitable future of the world. He tells his tale in detail. Read more
Published on June 24 2007 by bernie
5.0 out of 5 stars I saw the movie first. The book difference was a surprise
An unnamed time traveler sees the future of man (802,701 A.D.) and then the inevitable future of the world. He tells his tale in detail. Read more
Published on Aug. 13 2006 by bernie
5.0 out of 5 stars A timeless classic of science fiction
It goes without saying that this book is a science fiction classic in every sense of the word and that H.G. Wells was a founding father of the genre. Read more
Published on July 14 2006 by Daniel Jolley
1.0 out of 5 stars the Most overrated writer of science fiction!!
Granted Wells was far, far ahead of his time, but really, his writing stinks. There's no character formation (bland unlikeable protagonists) and no passion for the art of... Read more
Published on July 8 2005 by "fantasylover72"
5.0 out of 5 stars Moon
I'm only on page 70, but this book seems to be a great one!!!
Published on July 17 2004
5.0 out of 5 stars Still a Great Adventure
H.G. Wells, in The Time Machine, spins a classic tale full of adventure, vivid landscapes, sci-fi speculation and even a bit of veiled socialist politics. Read more
Published on June 19 2004 by Matt Poole
3.0 out of 5 stars A good book
Although I didn't like this one as much as Wells' other books, I did enjoy it and I am glad I read it. His view of the future is one that is interesting and thought-provoking. Read more
Published on May 27 2004 by Brendan
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