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The Time Machine [Mass Market Paperback]

H.G. Wells , Greg Bear
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (189 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 4.50
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Book Description

Oct. 1 2002

“I’ve had a most amazing time....”

 

So begins the Time Traveller’s astonishing firsthand account of his journey 800,000 years beyond his own era—and the story that launched H.G. Wells’s successful career and earned him his reputation as the father of science fiction. With a speculative leap that still fires the imagination, Wells sends his brave explorer to face a future burdened with our greatest hopes...and our darkest fears. A pull of the Time Machine’s lever propels him to the age of a slowly dying Earth.  There he discovers two bizarre races—the ethereal Eloi and the subterranean Morlocks—who not only symbolize the duality of human nature, but offer a terrifying portrait of the men of tomorrow as well.  Published in 1895, this masterpiece of invention captivated readers on the threshold of a new century. Thanks to Wells’s expert storytelling and provocative insight, The Time Machine will continue to enthrall readers for generations to come.

 


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Product Description

From School Library Journal

Grade 7 Up-H.G. Welles' classic begins at an English dinner party where a group of gentlemen are discussing the device that one of them is making so he can explore the fourth dimension. No one is identified by name but when the men gather the following week, the device's inventor, referred to as Time Traveler, is strangely absent. When he arrives later, he recounts his amazing sojourn into the future. Most of this 1895 novella deals with Time Traveler's stay in a world where dark forces lurk behind an idyllic exterior. After narrowly escaping from a forest fire and hostile creatures, Time Traveler uses his invention to investigate other time periods before returning to share his story with his friends. Despite the fact that he has returned with never-before-seen flowers, most of his companions do not believe him. When one of the dinner guests stops by Time Traveler's home a few days later, he is the last one to see the inventor before he and his Time Machine disappear. Ralph Cosham narrates this science fiction standard bearer with a controlled intensity that gives the story the feel of a modern drama. Add to that Welles' ability to predict some contemporary scenarios, and this recording will interest 21st century listeners. With a sturdy case and continual tracking every three minutes, this production will be a useful addition to school and public libraries that want to add classics to their science fiction holdings.
Barbara Wysocki, Cora J. Belden Library. Rocky Hill, CT
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Michael York is excellent as the Time Traveler, this classic can truly be enjoyed by listeners of all ages. -- KLIATT

Michael York is excellent in this full cast production. This classic can truly be enjoyed by listeners of all ages. -- KLIATT review magazine, May 2000

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
THE TIME TRAVELLER (for so it will be convenient to speak of him) was expounding a recondite matter to us. Read the first page
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Concordance
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating! July 7 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This is the story of an inventor that travels to the distant future in hopes of seeing how advanced humankind has become.
Instead, he finds humanity divided into two separate but interdependent species. There are the peaceful, beautiful, indolent, and fairly stupid Eloi who live a life of ease in a surface garden where they await being summoned by the Morlocks who are ugly, brutish, and cannibalistic. The Morlocks live underground where they run machines and just about everything else as well.
Ignorant of the Morlocks, the inventor make the acquaintance of an Eloi woman named Weena and, typical of the 19th-century male, finds her lack of actual intelligence rather endearing and falls in love with her. She shows him through the ruins of all that remains of his ancient world. There seems to have been a nuclear war, which is interesting, since this book was written in the 19th, NOT the 20th century.
When the Morlocks introduce themselves to the inventor by stealing his time machine, he must set about to rescue both himself and the Eloi....
The only reason I give this old favorite of mine 4 stars instead of 5 is for the often old-fashioned language that, though fast-paced for a Victorian novel, is still sometimes rather heavy in places. Yet the wonderful story more than redeems itself.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still a Great Adventure June 19 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
H.G. Wells, in The Time Machine, spins a classic tale full of adventure, vivid landscapes, sci-fi speculation and even a bit of veiled socialist politics.
An eccentric scientist, known only as the Time Traveller to us, invents a machine that can travel along the fourth dimension, which he has discovered to be time. He flings himself into the far future. Is there high civilization? No. Is there high technology? No. What he finds in the future is far more curious...
Personally, I couldn't put it down. I was reading it on a train trip, and I was so involved, I almost missed my station! Well's style really drew me in. It was like being told the story by an old friend. His descriptions are simple and effective, and you can almost feel the curiousity of the Time Traveller. Like him, you will want to know what happens next, from the speculations at the beginning, to the question filled ending.
Though much of it has been imitated and repeated in time travelling stories since, I thought the "scientific" parts of the book were still fresh today, particularly the reasons Wells gives for why we can't naturally go back in time, and why you will never see a person in the process of travelling back in time. Very clever.
In some ways, the "future" part of the book is a cautionary tale, in some ways it's a social commentary. Either way, the general message I got is that the actions of the past will have consequences in the future, even if we might not see them. Extensions of this concept have been very well used in science fiction since.
If you're looking for a well written adventure to capture you're imagination for a few hours, the Time Machine is a book worth checking out. Exciting and thought provoking all the way.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By bernie TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
An unnamed time traveler sees the future of man (802,701 A.D.) and then the inevitable future of the world. He tells his tale in detail.

I grew up on the Rod Taylor /George Pal movie. When I started the book I expected it to be slightly different with a tad more complexity as with most book/movie relationships. I was surprised to find the reason for the breakup of species (Morlock and Eloi) was class Vs atomic (in later movie versions it was political). I could live with that but to find that some little pink thing replaced Yvette Mimieux was too munch.

After al the surprises we can look at the story as unique in its time, first published in 1895, yet the message is timeless. The writing and timing could not have been better. And the ending was certainly appropriate for the world that he describes. Possibly if the story were written today the species division would be based on eugenics.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good book May 27 2004
By Brendan
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Although I didn't like this one as much as Wells' other books, I did enjoy it and I am glad I read it. His view of the future is one that is interesting and thought-provoking. The book remains fresh and suprising despite its age. Unfortunately, it doesn't really seem to go anywhere. The reader learns the theme of the book pretty early on, and the rest of the book the reader follows the time traveler home. I feel like Wells could have done more with this book and done more with the main character, the time traveler.
Although this book was fun to read, and the theme was very interesting and worth thinking about, more could have been done and the reader is left a little unfulfilled. If you have read HG Wells and enjoyed his other books then I definately think you should read this one. If not, I suggest you start with some of his other works like Dr. Moreau or The Invisible Man.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
By bernie TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
An unnamed time traveler sees the future of man (802,701 A.D.) and then the inevitable future of the world. He tells his tale in detail.

I grew up on the Rod Taylor /George Pal movie. When I started the book I expected it to be slightly different with a tad more complexity as with most book/movie relationships. I was surprised to find the reason for the breakup of species (Morlock and Eloi) was class Vs atomic (in later movie versions it was political). I could live with that but to find that some little pink thing replaced Yvette Mimieux was too munch.

After all the surprises we can look at the story as unique in its time, first published in 1895, yet the message is timeless. The writing and timing could not have been better. And the ending was certainly appropriate for the world that he describes. Possibly if the story were written today the species division would be based on eugenics.
Was this review helpful to you?
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Most recent customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars awesome
one of my favourite movies old and new versions , now one of my favourite books, the awesome imagination of the time
Published 11 months ago by Gerri
3.0 out of 5 stars Very weak protagonist....
While I commend both HG Wells and Jules Verne for creating a new fictional genre that has proven itself to be highly prophetic, there is a major problem with this fictional... Read more
Published on Oct. 27 2011 by Ronald W. Maron
5.0 out of 5 stars I saw the movie first. The book difference was a surprise.
An unnamed time traveler sees the future of man (802,701 A.D.) and then the inevitable future of the world. He tells his tale in detail. Read more
Published on Sept. 23 2010 by bernie
5.0 out of 5 stars The Start of Something Special
In any discussion of the history of Science Fiction, H. G. (Herbert George) Wells is sure to be mentioned, and "The Time Machine" is the first of his novels/novellas. Read more
Published on Sept. 14 2010 by Dave_42
5.0 out of 5 stars I saw the movie first. The book difference was a surprise.
An unnamed time traveler sees the future of man (802,701 A.D.) and then the inevitable future of the world. He tells his tale in detail. Read more
Published on June 24 2007 by bernie
5.0 out of 5 stars I saw the movie first. The book difference was a surprise
An unnamed time traveler sees the future of man (802,701 A.D.) and then the inevitable future of the world. He tells his tale in detail. Read more
Published on Aug. 13 2006 by bernie
5.0 out of 5 stars A timeless classic of science fiction
It goes without saying that this book is a science fiction classic in every sense of the word and that H.G. Wells was a founding father of the genre. Read more
Published on July 14 2006 by Daniel Jolley
1.0 out of 5 stars the Most overrated writer of science fiction!!
Granted Wells was far, far ahead of his time, but really, his writing stinks. There's no character formation (bland unlikeable protagonists) and no passion for the art of... Read more
Published on July 8 2005 by "fantasylover72"
4.0 out of 5 stars The Time Machine
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells depeicts the story of a man known as the time traveler who travels into the distant future with a time machine that he creates. Read more
Published on July 20 2004 by Jacob Gest
5.0 out of 5 stars Moon
I'm only on page 70, but this book seems to be a great one!!!
Published on July 17 2004
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