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The Tin Man
 
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The Tin Man [Kindle Edition]

Dale Brown
2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (73 customer reviews)

Print List Price: CDN$ 10.99
Kindle Price: CDN$ 8.99 includes free international wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
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Sold by: Random House Canada, Incorp.
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Kindle Edition CDN $4.16  
Kindle Edition, Nov. 4 2009 --  
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Paperback --  
Mass Market Paperback CDN $9.89  
Audio, CD, Abridged, Audiobook --  

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Product Description

From Amazon

Patrick McLanahan, a sometime secret agent for the military and an associate of a high-tech company that manufactures weapons for the armed forces, is the hero of Dale Brown's fast-paced thriller The Tin Man. When McLanahan's kid brother, a rookie cop in Sacramento, is severely injured by a gang of international terrorists, McLanahan decides to take justice into his own hands and shut down their operation. In order to do so, McLanahan must figure out who these heavily-armed thugs are and track them down. He and the owner of the high-tech company develop a powerful weapon to help him accomplish that task--a bulletproof suit equipped with rocket thrusters that makes McLanahan a formidable fighting machine. McLanahan soon comes to be known as the tin man.

Meanwhile, the criminal mastermind Gregory Townsend and his cohorts in the Aryan Brigade wreak havoc in California. They stage a violent armed robbery and try to wrest control of the booming trade in illegal drugs from neo-Nazi biker gangs. Townsend tells a new recruit that he and his men plan to become "the Microsoft of the methamphetamine trade"--but it seems likely that his goal is even larger and more sinister than that. This book should appeal to fans of Ian Fleming's James Bond thrillers. Like Bond, McLanahan gets to use a lot of cleverly-designed high-tech gadgets to extract himself from sticky situations. The Tin Man is packed with skillfully crafted action scenes. It's a pretty good yarn. --Jill Marquis

From Publishers Weekly

The tag line "This time it's personal" comes to mind in Brown's 11th techno-thriller (after Fatal Terrain). Instead of foreign countries and the threat of WWIII, international terrorism hits the streets of Sacramento, Calif., in the form of Gregory Townsend, who is apparently out to unite California's motorcycle gangs and corner the amphetamine market. His one mistake is wounding the brother of Brown's series hero, veteran Patrick McLanahan, during the robbery of a mall. The resulting mayhem is a tribute to Brown's storytelling abilities; it's an unlikely but successful mix of a revenge plot, a meditation on vigilante justice and a superhero-origin story. McLanahan becomes a one-man army, known as the Tin Man, with the help of some cutting-edge technology from his current employer, a defense contractor. It turns out that Townsend's ultimate aims are not quite what they appear to be; Brown's intentions are just as slippery. While the dark side of vigilante justice has haunted pulp fiction heroes like the Avenger and comic book heroes from Batman to the Punisher, it's a rarity in thriller fiction, which usually likes to keep things black and white and far from home. Brown does the opposite in this novel?he gives this modern Batman a hard-edged twist and a dose of techno-reality, and through a neat plot twist shows how the power to survive and to commit violence is both painful and seductive. Bottom line, it's a page-turning start to a fresh new direction for both Brown and McLanahan. And now that the Tin Man is part of Brown's universe, it will be interesting to see what Brown makes of him. Major ad/promo; simultaneous BBD Audio.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1197 KB
  • Print Length: 466 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0007361726
  • Publisher: Bantam; Reprint edition (Nov. 4 2009)
  • Sold by: Random House Canada, Incorp.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0030P1WJ0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (73 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #236,058 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars Awful. April 24 2003
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I saw this book on a store shelf about two years ago, and having heard good reviews for Dale Brown decided to pick it up. Shortly after that, the book managed to get lost on my bookshelf and I never noticed it again until a week ago. Boy, I wish I hadn't noticed it.
I read someone's review that said that people who liked Brown's other books usually seemed to hate this one. Having heard this, I think that would be the only reason I would ever read another one of his books. The plot was scattered, the villain had no clear motive other than he was "crazy," and the characters and dialogue just became too annoying. I did finish the book, but then immediately threw the thing across the room as a final act of getting it out of my system. It was THAT bad.
If you need an escape from reality and don't mind reading a book that doesn't have any of that baggage called "thought" then you might actually like this book. But honestly, I haven't been this annoyed with a book since Dragon by Clive Cussler. If you want real action and grit, go with Andy McNab.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Splash and Style... but Substance? Eh... Sept. 28 2001
Format:Audio CD
This review is in regard to the 5-CD set, skillfully read by Victor Garber. Mr. Garber's solo vocal dexterity is smooth and unswerving, giving each character enough distinction that the listener can easily recognize their speech patterns.
The Tin Man is a fast-paced story crafted to pull its audience in quickly then hold them in a vice grip. The tone is earnest, but there isn't much substance (ie: cohesive, compelling plot) behind the scene descriptions. The main character, Patrick McLanahan, is surprisingly shallow in this story. There is great potential for depth with his secret military background, but that is barely brushed over. His experiences as Sacramento's vigilante hero also harbor great possibilities for character examination, but they are unfortunately reduced to a sort of mad-marauder punch-em-up scenes. A little more cloak and dagger use of his technology would have been intriguing (and in character). It becomes clear by the end of the tale, the author was stretching for descriptions of super-suit inflicted pain: "It felt like his hand had been sandwiched between the bumpers of two crashing cars..." Also, there was a little more profanity than I personally prefer, and in many cases, it was unnecessary.
Overall, the story has a rather formulaic feel, but Victor Garber's fine performance makes it nonetheless entertaining.
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3.0 out of 5 stars No plot, but very entertaining anyway April 3 2001
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I was looking for a modern english novel to write a book report on. When I first saw this book I was fascinated by its cool cover. I suppose, this is not exactly the kind of novel you would chose to write a book report on, but I gave it a try anyway.
The story is about some guy who fights a gang of drug dealers, who have injured his brother heavily. But all this is part of a plan by a super villain who wants to steal some military airplanes to sell them to Arabic dictators. He commands a elite combat force that consists of so called Nazis. The hero's only chance to succeed is a super combat suit, which a mad scientist, who happens to be a friend of his, has invented. Well, quite an unrealistic plot, I guess.
But the book is real fun to read. You don't get tired of it. You feel as if you were watching a action movie. However, when I started to write a summary of this book, I noticed that the plot was totally discontinuosly. I hardly could figure out, what had been going on the last 400 pages. So if you expect a deep storyline here, this isn't for you. But if you want to have a good laugh, get this. By the way: I got an A for my book report, although my teacher didn't like the book at all.
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4.0 out of 5 stars It was pretty good April 11 1999
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Overall, I liked Dale Brown's latest. The opening scenes, and Gregory Townsend's planning an execution of the robberies and methamphetamine lab takeovers made for an action-packed start. But what are his real motives? And when Patrick McLanahan's brother, who is a rookie cop, is shot by one of Townsend's fellow terrorists, McLanahan takes the law into his own hands with an assortment of gadgets, James Bond style! The main instrument of the story is that advanced BERP suit, which is made of a special bulletproof material and protects him from gunfire. And the local police don't take too kindly to his vigilante antics, so he becomes a wanted man by everyone while he tries to avenge his brother's shooting and discovers more than he bargained for! Some lively action, awesome technology which might be feasible one day and good characterisations. I read this book twice(as I have with most of Dale Brown's books!) in the past couple of months, and it's better the second time round. The ending might seem daft at times, but the rest of the book makes up for it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An amazing story rol by a master May 2 1998
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
American are unaware that the enemy has landed and plans an ethnic cleansing that will make the holocaust seem like a minor disturbance. The mastermind behind this diabolical plot is Gregory Townsend, an international terrorist. Gregory recently eliminated his cohort Henri Cazaux, a maniac who tried to control American air space. In his beginning gambit , Gregory and his Aryan Brigade conduct a daring robbery of several million dollars that left three police officers dead and one injured.
Brigadier General Patrick McLanahan is the brother of the injured cop. He begins to investigate who injured his sibling. Patrick's actions come to the attention of Gregory, who he wants to add to his organization. Gregory threatens Patrick's family if he fails to cooperate. Instead of rolling over, Patrick dons the prototype body suit of the twenty-first century soldier. His plan is to go on the attack and bring down the Aryan Brigade and its charismatic leader. Patrick is now dubbed as THE TIN MAN by the media. However, he knows that accomplishing his mission will probably lead him down a path that will make him go outside the law to complete his goal.
Although the technology seems way too advanced for 1998, Dale Brown has thoroughly researched his material and makes a legitimate case that this weaponry could theoretically be in service today. Because of this uncanny ability, this master creator of military thrillers gives his audience a dramatic masterpiece with his latest work, THE TIN MAN. The protagonist is a complex, fascinating person, who leaves readers wondering if the end justifies the means. The novel is a frightening work because it dims the lines between patriot and terrorist,and leaves the readers wondering what will come next from this talented author.

Harriet Klausner
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Most recent customer reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars A mixbag,...
This is my first Dale Brown book. I must say I like his imagination in intergrating the high-tech gadgets (including the BERP material) into this story. Read more
Published on Aug. 15 2003 by Bimal Gunapala
1.0 out of 5 stars Bad? worse!
I am a fan of Mr Brown's aviation books. I can't believe it's him that wrote this drivel. Please don't buy it, buy any of his "Old Dog" books instead.
Published on June 25 2003 by Tango
5.0 out of 5 stars Dale does it again!
First off, I thought the Tin Man wouldn't be a very good book, Dale Brown usually works with bombers and aviation, and this one had not much to do with that. Well, boy was I wrong. Read more
Published on April 29 2003 by WG
3.0 out of 5 stars split personality
This is one half of a terrific novel. The first half, a gritty no-punches-held crime drama, is dynamite as it introduces the characters and sets up the inevitable conflict, even... Read more
Published on March 27 2003 by David Group
5.0 out of 5 stars The tin man armour is developed...
Fantastic story about Patrick MacClanahan brother Paul. The story starts out with Paul's first day on the job as a cop, and just how things go so badly wrong during a... Read more
Published on Nov. 16 2002 by Tanya L. Schaub
2.0 out of 5 stars Barely Two Stars
Oh my. This was my first and last Dale Brown book. I was expecting something better. It took serious effort to stick with this book to the finish. Read more
Published on Nov. 29 2001 by T. SIMPSON
2.0 out of 5 stars Pretty Bad
It's a shame. A good author prints a couple of really good books and for whatever reason ends up regurgitating poor books with little plot but guaranteed to generate revenue at a... Read more
Published on Nov. 19 2001 by Amazon Customer
2.0 out of 5 stars Don't bother...
Utter crap. It just never quite seemed to tie together in any believable way, and you were left with the feeling that there were huge gaps in the storyline. Read more
Published on Oct. 16 2000
1.0 out of 5 stars Laugh? I nearly shat myself...
Oh boy.
Thanks Dale, I'm writing my first novel at the moment - a financial thriller.
You have given me hope - yes! Read more
Published on Sept. 8 2000
3.0 out of 5 stars I thought I was reading a Marvel comic
The book was somewhat entertaining, but its not the novel you would expect from Dale Brown. He transforms Patrick McLanahan into Frank Castle. Read more
Published on Aug. 18 2000 by Shawn Smith
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