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The Tin Roof Blowdown: A Dave Robicheaux Novel Audio CD – Audiobook, Unabridged


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Product Details

  • Audio CD: 14 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio; Unabridged edition (July 17 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 074356751X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743567510
  • Product Dimensions: 12.5 x 14.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 386 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,056,121 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kate Willard on July 17 2007
Format: Hardcover
Burke is the best around and he proves it again in the 16th Detective Robicheaux novel. He is able to capture the spirit of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast while telling a captivating story, and also illustrate much of what went wrong in our response to Hurricane Katrina--but he also shows what the human spirit can over come. Robicheaux's is investigating the shooting of one of two looters after they had looted the home of one of the city's most powerful mobsters. He Must find the surviving looter before the mobsters goons can get him. At the same time he is looking into the disappearance of a Ninth Ward priest who vanished while trying to save members of his congregation who were trapped by the hurricane flood waters. Burke is able to straddle the line between good and evil with each of his characters in such a way that the outcome is not foreseen and the gray areas are real. In the end though, the human spirit always shines through!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Aug. 18 2007
Format: Paperback
The fictional parts of The Tin Roof Blowdown pale in comparison with the factual references in the book to the horrible disasters that befell those who lived in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina blasted its way across those vulnerable levees. Building on that apocalyptic event, we see souls stripped to their cores . . . revealing much that is normally hidden during "civilized" times. James Lee Burke has written one of the most powerful novels I've ever read about troubles bring out whatever is in us.

Mr. Burke does a marvelous job of capturing the shifting emotions of those who lived through the experience. Many began by being optimistic that things would not be too bad. Others saw the storm as an opportunity for gain. But soon, the caring were overwhelmed by the horrible dangers being faced by the vulnerable. With unending challenges, emotions became dulled through fatigue. After a little rest, the civilized veneer began to return and people were outraged by the excesses. As the implications of all the harm sunk in, people just wanted to forget about it. Those who had felt something for the victims eventually go back to looking out for themselves. No one knows what really happened to most of the victims . . . other than that they were abandoned by those who might have helped them. It's a time of infamy in American history . . . especially since we did it to ourselves.

As the book opens, Dave Robicheaux's friend, Clete Purcel is looking to recover some cons who have skipped bail. Jude LeBlanc, a priest who is dying of cancer, heads by bus for a date with destiny in the lower end of New Orleans' Ninth Ward. Otis Baylor, a self-satisfied insurance agent, is planning to sit out the storm in comfort with his family thanks to his generators.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
The book has a lot to say about the fate of a great city which has been destroyed by nature and not protected by man. With such a powerful story it is a shame that the ending is lack luster.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Aug. 18 2007
Format: Hardcover
The fictional parts of The Tin Roof Blowdown pale in comparison with the factual references in the book to the horrible disasters that befell those who lived in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina blasted its way across those vulnerable levees. Building on that apocalyptic event, we see souls stripped to their cores . . . revealing much that is normally hidden during "civilized" times. James Lee Burke has written one of the most powerful novels I've ever read about how troubles bring out whatever is in us.

Mr. Burke does a marvelous job of capturing the shifting emotions of those who lived through the experience. Many began by being optimistic that things would not be too bad. Others saw the storm as an opportunity for gain. But soon, the caring were overwhelmed by the horrible dangers being faced by the vulnerable. With unending challenges, emotions became dulled through fatigue. After a little rest, the civilized veneer began to return and people were outraged by the excesses. As the implications of all the harm sunk in, people just wanted to forget about it. Those who had felt something for the victims eventually go back to looking out for themselves. No one knows what really happened to most of the victims . . . other than that they were abandoned by those who might have helped them. It's a time of infamy in American history . . . especially since we did it to ourselves.

As the book opens, Dave Robicheaux's friend, Clete Purcel is looking to recover some cons who have skipped bail. Jude LeBlanc, a priest who is dying of cancer, heads by bus for a date with destiny in the lower end of New Orleans' Ninth Ward. Otis Baylor, a self-satisfied insurance agent, is planning to sit out the storm in comfort with his family thanks to his generators.
Read more ›
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By OftenTypical on Oct. 20 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
First book I have read by this author.

I found the book a little dry, contradicting, and sometimes hard to follow. Perhaps the writing style is not my preference.

The ending was unpredictable and worthwhile.

Probably will not read books by this author again.
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