The Tin Roof Blowdown: A Dave Robicheaux Novel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading The Tin Roof Blowdown: A Dave Robicheaux Novel on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Tin Roof Blowdown: A Dave Robicheaux Novel [Audiobook, Unabridged] [Audio CD]

James Lee Burke , Will Patton
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 59.00
Price: CDN$ 37.17 & FREE Shipping. Details
You Save: CDN$ 21.83 (37%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Usually ships within 2 to 4 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition --  
Hardcover, Large Print CDN $37.71  
Paperback CDN $12.26  
Mass Market Paperback CDN $8.99  
Audio, CD, Abridged, Audiobook CDN $14.59  
Audio, CD, Audiobook, Unabridged CDN $37.17  
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

July 17 2007 Dave Robicheaux Mysteries
In the waning days of summer, 2005, a storm with greater impact than the bomb that struck Hiroshima peels the face off southern Louisiana.

This is the gruesome reality Iberia Parish Sheriff's Detective Dave Robicheaux discovers as he is deployed to New Orleans. As James Lee Burke's new novel, The Tin Roof Blowdown, begins, Hurricane Katrina has left the commercial district and residential neighborhoods awash with looters and predators of every stripe. The power grid of the city has been destroyed, New Orleans reduced to the level of a medieval society. There is no law, no order, no sanctuary for the infirm, the helpless, and the innocent. Bodies float in the streets and lie impaled on the branches of flooded trees. In the midst of an apocalyptical nightmare, Robicheaux must find two serial rapists, a morphine-addicted priest, and a vigilante who may be more dangerous than the criminals looting the city.

In a singular style that defies genre, James Lee Burke has created a hauntingly bleak picture of life in New Orleans after Katrina. Filled with complex characters and depictions of people at both their best and worst, The Tin Roof Blowdown is not only an action-packed crime thriller, but a poignant story of courage and sacrifice that critics are already calling Burke's best work.

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed


Product Details


Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. The pain, dismay and anger brought on by the events surrounding Hurricane Katrina explodes from the pages of this new Dave Robicheaux novel. For nearly a quarter of a century, Burke has used this series, despite their dark subject matter, to show his obvious love of the land, the people and the cultures of the South and specifically New Orleans. There is a mystery for Robicheaux to solve, but it's the destruction of Burke's beloved New Orleans that resonates like thunder throughout the book. Will Patton, who has come to embody the heart and soul of Burke's weary, Southern knight, matches the author's prose in all its intensity and pain. Adept as he is at portraying the eccentric, the evil and the endearing characters found in Burke's books, it is the actor's reading of Burke's descriptive passages, whether it be a storm forming off the Louisiana coast or the shock of blood escaping from a gunshot wound, that creates a fully realized world for the listener. Patton's insightful interpretation of Burke's darkly expressive imagery makes for a rich literary experience rarely achieved in crime fiction today.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* "I wanted to wake to the great, gold-green, sun-spangled promise of the South Louisiana in which I had grown up. I didn't want to be part of the history taking place in our state." That sentence wouldn't be out of place in any of Burke's Dave Robicheaux novels, all of which have been distinguished by their elegiac tone, but it's only fitting that it should appear in his latest, a heartfelt post-Katrina ode to a lost New Orleans and a lost world. In a sense, Dave Robicheaux, Burke's Cajun detective, whose heart is in the past and whose eyes are on the horizon, expecting trouble, has always been anticipating Katrina--or at least some form of cataclysm--as he has watched his world spin further and further out of control. But Katrina was no fictional event, and Burke writes about its aftermath as vividly and powerfully as any nonfiction chronicler. The plot itself, the investigation of the murder of two black men in the ninth ward, hinges on familiar Burke tropes--the powerless caught in a web of circumstance; surprising acts of nobility from the least likely people; unfathomable evil prompting eruptions of Robicheaux's thinly suppressed rage--but the novel's power comes from the way it explores the tragedy of Katrina in a way that is perfectly in tune with the series, a kind of perfect storm brought together by the confluence of fictional and nonfictional realms. Bill Ott
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.2 out of 5 stars
4.2 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In the wake of Katrina redemption is found... July 17 2007
Format:Hardcover
Burke is the best around and he proves it again in the 16th Detective Robicheaux novel. He is able to capture the spirit of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast while telling a captivating story, and also illustrate much of what went wrong in our response to Hurricane Katrina--but he also shows what the human spirit can over come. Robicheaux's is investigating the shooting of one of two looters after they had looted the home of one of the city's most powerful mobsters. He Must find the surviving looter before the mobsters goons can get him. At the same time he is looking into the disappearance of a Ninth Ward priest who vanished while trying to save members of his congregation who were trapped by the hurricane flood waters. Burke is able to straddle the line between good and evil with each of his characters in such a way that the outcome is not foreseen and the gray areas are real. In the end though, the human spirit always shines through!
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
The fictional parts of The Tin Roof Blowdown pale in comparison with the factual references in the book to the horrible disasters that befell those who lived in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina blasted its way across those vulnerable levees. Building on that apocalyptic event, we see souls stripped to their cores . . . revealing much that is normally hidden during "civilized" times. James Lee Burke has written one of the most powerful novels I've ever read about troubles bring out whatever is in us.

Mr. Burke does a marvelous job of capturing the shifting emotions of those who lived through the experience. Many began by being optimistic that things would not be too bad. Others saw the storm as an opportunity for gain. But soon, the caring were overwhelmed by the horrible dangers being faced by the vulnerable. With unending challenges, emotions became dulled through fatigue. After a little rest, the civilized veneer began to return and people were outraged by the excesses. As the implications of all the harm sunk in, people just wanted to forget about it. Those who had felt something for the victims eventually go back to looking out for themselves. No one knows what really happened to most of the victims . . . other than that they were abandoned by those who might have helped them. It's a time of infamy in American history . . . especially since we did it to ourselves.

As the book opens, Dave Robicheaux's friend, Clete Purcel is looking to recover some cons who have skipped bail. Jude LeBlanc, a priest who is dying of cancer, heads by bus for a date with destiny in the lower end of New Orleans' Ninth Ward. Otis Baylor, a self-satisfied insurance agent, is planning to sit out the storm in comfort with his family thanks to his generators.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
3.0 out of 5 stars needs a rewrite July 16 2008
Format:Mass Market Paperback
The book has a lot to say about the fate of a great city which has been destroyed by nature and not protected by man. With such a powerful story it is a shame that the ending is lack luster.
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
The fictional parts of The Tin Roof Blowdown pale in comparison with the factual references in the book to the horrible disasters that befell those who lived in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina blasted its way across those vulnerable levees. Building on that apocalyptic event, we see souls stripped to their cores . . . revealing much that is normally hidden during "civilized" times. James Lee Burke has written one of the most powerful novels I've ever read about how troubles bring out whatever is in us.

Mr. Burke does a marvelous job of capturing the shifting emotions of those who lived through the experience. Many began by being optimistic that things would not be too bad. Others saw the storm as an opportunity for gain. But soon, the caring were overwhelmed by the horrible dangers being faced by the vulnerable. With unending challenges, emotions became dulled through fatigue. After a little rest, the civilized veneer began to return and people were outraged by the excesses. As the implications of all the harm sunk in, people just wanted to forget about it. Those who had felt something for the victims eventually go back to looking out for themselves. No one knows what really happened to most of the victims . . . other than that they were abandoned by those who might have helped them. It's a time of infamy in American history . . . especially since we did it to ourselves.

As the book opens, Dave Robicheaux's friend, Clete Purcel is looking to recover some cons who have skipped bail. Jude LeBlanc, a priest who is dying of cancer, heads by bus for a date with destiny in the lower end of New Orleans' Ninth Ward. Otis Baylor, a self-satisfied insurance agent, is planning to sit out the storm in comfort with his family thanks to his generators.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A little boring Oct. 20 2009
Format:Mass Market Paperback
First book I have read by this author.

I found the book a little dry, contradicting, and sometimes hard to follow. Perhaps the writing style is not my preference.

The ending was unpredictable and worthwhile.

Probably will not read books by this author again.
Was this review helpful to you?
Want to see more reviews on this item?
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback