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The Titanic Murders Audio Cassette – Abridged, Oct 1 2000


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--This text refers to the MP3 CD edition.
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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Americana Publishing; Abridged edition (October 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1588070409
  • ISBN-13: 978-1588070401
  • Product Dimensions: 17.3 x 10.9 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 227 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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By A Customer on June 6 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Reading this was akin to drinking a cocktail compounded of cardboard, glue, and tap water. It is lifeless, unimaginative, plodding, predictable, and slow. How anyone could make the Titanic tragedy and a cast of potentially fascinating characters into something this boring is amazing. Futrelle's shortest and slightest "Thinking Machine" story has twice the plot and intelligence of this achingly dull garbage barge of a book.
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By Amy Leemon on Sept. 29 2002
Format: Audio Cassette
Max Allan Collins makes history come to life and you find yourself thinking...."well, maybe"...
His meticilous research shows - you can picture the scenes and even the elaborate clothes. The plot is plausible (altho I agree with the reviewers that he shouldn't have used the names of actual people on the ship and made them the villians only because he could find nothing out about them) and of course, the ending no surprise.
Well worth your time for a quick read.
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By meiringen on Sept. 13 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Collins uses a real passenger on the Titanic, Jacques Futrelle (author of the wonderful mystery short story "The Problem of Cell 13" [amongst others], and who was lost when the ship sank), as a detective investigating a crime on board the famous liner. Once you accept the premise, it's not too bad of a mystery novel.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
That's pretty much how it goes... light murder-mystery fare set on the world's most famous doomed liner. OK for fans of the genre or die-hard TITANIC enthusiasts. Otherwise, skip it.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I was a bigger fan of Mr. Collins when he wrote crime thrillers set in contemporary times (do yourself a favor and check your used book store for excellent titles like "No Cure For Death", "A Shroud For Aquarius", "Spree", and "Quarry"). For my money, no one portrayed normal people tentatively reaching out and forming connections- whether they were romantic, sexual, or just to ease oppressive loneliness- than Mr. Collins. And all this sensitively drawn character interaction took place amidst bang-up, engrossing thriller plots set in middle American locales we hadn't seen a million times before. But enough about the past; Mr. Collins now primarily devotes his time to historical mysteries, mainly his Nate Heller series that mixes real-life famous figures with his fictional characters. This clever novel, "The Titanic Murders", goes a step further: pretty much everyone in the novel is real, though of course the mystery story is fictional. Yes, we don't get the gritty realism of Collins' contemporary thrillers, but I have to say I enjoyed this speculative story about real-life mystery writer Jacques Futrelle and his final days on the Titanic. And although (like most of Collins' current historical fiction) the story is fanciful and larger than life, readers still get to enjoy glimpses of the old Collins in the form of understated, pleasing character interaction between Futrelle, his wife, and their traveling companions. I still rather see Collins write about his Nolan, Mallory, and Quarry characters, but I honestly did enjoy this well-researched, involving, and fast-paced thriller, which is a genuine cut above most of the "quickie" Titanic products that flooded the market after the success of the James Cameron film.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I was immediatley drawn into the premise of this book simply because I have been a Titanic buff for over 15 years, and I was happy to discover it was not a love/class story. The author deftly moves us through richly detailed staterooms, meals, and accurate charcters down to the stewards. The attempt to make one feel as if they are on the ship and in the company of the cream of Edwardian society, while also weaving a tale of mystery and murder, is well achieved. I also love the idea of planting the seed of possible reality into the plot. The only drawback I could find was while I generally enjoyed the authenticity of the primary characters being real people, I was a bit put off by the fact that two most likely innocent men have been villianized in a work of fiction. This however detracts nothing from the book itself. Very convincing, and a great summer read. I am glad to have stumbled upon it.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
At first it seems promising- a Titanic novel with real characters, and it's not a romance either. These are both very, very rare things in this field, so despite the title I awaited The Titanic Murders with eagerness. Once I actually read it, though, I found myself disappointed. It is researched carefully, with a great attention to detail, but the use of said details is probably its greatest fault. Collins drops details the way another person would drop names- he can't seem to resist the urge to toss every possible character, incident and reference from the Titanic into his story, and they aren't that well-integrated either. The effect, rather than one of refreshing reality, ends up being more irritating than anything else. Another issue was that, given Collins' care in having every character be a real person, he did not seem to bother to learn much about the real personalities of some. His vastly out-of-character version of J. Bruce Ismay is not only absolutely nothing like the man, it's not even much like the stereotypes of him from later Titanic movies and literature. He seems to have made this beyond-arrogant, aggressive and tricky-minded person of which he writes up out of whole cloth. At least he got the physical description perfectly (the 6'4" Ismay has been turned into a short man in Titanic novels before) as well as a few aspects and habits (the nervous smile) that were fact-based. Most of the rest of the cast (except Futrelle himself, about whom I don't know enough to judge) also struck me as slightly stereotyped. I do have to commend Collins on his writing of the mystery story itself and on the characterization of his star. His research, though I didn't like the way it was applied, was stunning and made this possibly the most factual fictional Titanic.Read more ›
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