The Unwritten Girl: The Unwritten Books and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
  • List Price: CDN$ 12.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 1.30 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Unwritten Girl: The U... has been added to your Cart
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Daily-Deal-
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This Book is in Good Condition. Clean Copy With Light Amount of Wear. 100% Guaranteed.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Unwritten Girl: The Unwritten Books Paperback – Apr 1 2006


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 11.69
CDN$ 11.61 CDN$ 2.81

2014 Books Gift Guide for Children & Teens
Browse our featured books to find gift ideas for the boys or girls on your holiday shopping list this year!

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Paperback: 180 pages
  • Publisher: Dundurn; 1st Edition edition (April 1 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1550026046
  • ISBN-13: 978-1550026047
  • Product Dimensions: 13.4 x 1.3 x 17.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #581,499 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Both The Unwritten Girl and Fathom Five are interesting novels of fantasy…both boys and girls will be able to relate to, and find equal pleasure in, reading this series."

"…a story full of fairytales, mystery, and adventure."

About the Author

James Bow's first novel, The Unwritten Girl, introduced readers to the strange and compelling worlds of Rosemary and Peter in 26. A transit enthusiast, urban planner, and freelance journalist, James lives in Kitchener, Ontario, with his wife, poet Erin Noteboom.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By TeensReadToo.com on Feb. 23 2007
Format: Paperback
Rosemary Watson likes the company of books much better than that of people her own age. Which explains her hesitance to accept the help of the new boy, Peter. That and the weird thing she saw in the library right before. It looked like a girl, but it folded up and disappeared. The only thing Rosemary knows for sure is that it was angry. And if there's anything worse than a hallucination, it's one that's mad at you. Maybe she's just going to have a nervous breakdown like her older brother, Theo.

Due to a huge freak storm, and missing the bus, Rosemary is forced to bring Peter home. Theo seems to be literally lost in a book; he can't put it down or stop reading it. He won't even let Rosemary look at it. When she manages to get a peek, she is shocked to realize the book is blank until Theo reads it. Theo snatches the book out of her view and warns her to "look out for the books."

After another visit from angry ghost girl, a near breakdown from Theo, and a message from Puck, it appears that it is up to Rosemary and Peter to save Theo. He has gone to the Land of Fiction to try and keep Rosemary safe, and now she needs to rescue him.

Rosemary and Peter must navigate the Land of Fiction, with Puck as their guide. They must meet challenges, find their strength, face their fears, and find out why so many of the characters in the Land of Fiction are so angry with Rosemary.

I can't describe to you how great I thought this book was! Between the idea of being truly sucked into a book, to living in the stories that you've read, to the fabulous reason that all of the characters are upset. It's hilarious, scary, exciting, and impossible to put down. I've always loved Puck, and the fact that he speaks mostly in iambic pentameter, intended or not, is just too perfect. If you're a book fanatic, this is an absolute must!

Reviewed by: Carrie Spellman
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steven R. McEvoy HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on Jan. 8 2012
Format: Paperback
The premise of this book grabbed me right away, and to be honest, the whole series looks amazing. Rosemary Watson is seeing things. Characters seem to unfold into existence and they are after her, and they definitely want something from her. Soon, her brother Theo is home from school but he seems to be captured by a book. Rosemary soon realizes that the characters she is seeing, her brother's single-minded focus on a book, and her life turned upside down by Puck, the fairy shapeshifter from Shakespeare, appearing and trying to guide her, means she has not lost her mind but great things are at stake. Soon Puck, Rosemary and her new friend Peter McAllister, are lost in an adventure in the land of fiction.

The story had an amazing pace. Once you start reading it you will be hard- pressed to put it down. The characters were incredible, and the plot, mind-blowing. In many ways it is almost as if Madeleine L'Engle's two main series crossed paths in this book - Chronos, real world time and Kairos, other time, science fiction and fantasy have crossed paths. And much like Meg in the Kairos novels, Rosemary is a great heroine who discovers herself and grows into herself as the novel progresses. With reading, on average, over 100 books a year, there are lots of books I like, but few I absolutely love. This one falls into that second category.

I have had the pleasure of meeting James Bow on a few occasions in and around the University of Waterloo and other events in and around Kitchener/ Waterloo. I had heard the words genius and prodigy spoken about him on a few occasions and by different sources. But it was not until I read this book that I really glimpsed what they were talking about. This book was masterfully written.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Courtesy of Teens Read Too Dec 1 2006
By TeensReadToo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Rosemary Watson likes the company of books much better than that of people her own age. Which explains her hesitance to accept the help of the new boy, Peter. That and the weird thing she saw in the library right before. It looked like a girl, but it folded up and disappeared. The only thing Rosemary knows for sure is that it was angry. And if there's anything worse than a hallucination, it's one that's mad at you. Maybe she's just going to have a nervous breakdown like her older brother, Theo.

Due to a huge freak storm, and missing the bus, Rosemary is forced to bring Peter home. Theo seems to be literally lost in a book; he can't put it down or stop reading it. He won't even let Rosemary look at it. When she manages to get a peak, she is shocked to realize the book is blank until Theo reads it. Theo snatches the book out of her view and warns her to "look out for the books."

After another visit from angry ghost girl, a near breakdown from Theo, and a message from Puck, it appears that it is up to Rosemary and Peter to save Theo. He has gone to the Land of Fiction to try and keep Rosemary safe, and now she needs to rescue him.

Rosemary and Peter must navigate the Land of Fiction, with Puck as their guide. They must meet challenges, find their strength, face their fears, and find out why so many of the characters in the Land of Fiction are so angry with Rosemary.

I can't describe to you how great I thought this book was! Between the idea of being truly sucked into a book, to living in the stories that you've read, to the fabulous reason that all of the characters are upset. It's hilarious, scary, exciting, and impossible to put down. I've always loved Puck, and the fact that he speaks mostly in iambic pentameter, intended or not, is just too perfect. If you're a book fanatic, this is an absolute must!

Reviewed by: Carrie Spellman
Interesting concept Sept. 24 2013
By Romancing the Book - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Reviewed by Nancy
Book provided by the author for review
Originally posted at Romancing the Book

You're reading a book and then you put it down, turning your attention to other things. What happens to the book's characters when you stop reading? That's the question James Bow asks in The Unwritten Girl, a charming and imaginative fantasy for middle-school readers.

Rosemary Watson prefers facts to stories; she'd rather read the Encyclopedia Britannica than get emotionally involved in the pain and conflict of literature. But when her older brother Theo literally loses himself in a book, Rosemary must venture into the Land of Fiction to find him and bring him home.

Rosemary is helped on her quest by Peter, a new boy at her school, and Puck, Midsummer Night's Dream character and their guide in the Land of Fiction. Every bit as strange as you might image, the Land of Fiction is the kind of place where ideas grow on trees and a boy can turn into an eagle just by asking, "What if?" It's populated by all kinds of characters: from numbers to knights, from detectives to a villainous mad scientist. There's also a girl very much like Rosemary, who was left in a terrifying situation when Rosemary stopped reading her book.

Puck describes the Land of Fiction as "a patchwork of stories," and that's how Rosemary and Peter experience it. With each new story they enter, their clothes and surroundings change, and they encounter new characters and a new test. Rosemary is smart and resourceful, and Peter makes a likable and loyal sidekick. As they themselves become characters in a series of stories, they face increasing danger and learn important life lessons.

Author Bow clearly had a lot of fun creating this world. The Unwritten Girl is the kind of book that richly rewards imaginative involvement. Middle-school-aged readers will enjoy Bow's silly puns and sometimes mind-bending ideas, although they're likely to miss literary allusions to writers such as Shakespeare, Agatha Christie, and Arthur Conan Doyle.
Boring and didn't engage me at all July 30 2012
By La Coccinelle - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book just didn't impress me at all. It seems to follow all the rules and it *should* be a decent read, but I just couldn't get into the story. The characters were flat, the dialogue was corny, and the plot was both unsophisticated and confusing. I reminded me of Bonnie Dobkin's Dream Spinner, which I didn't really like either. Both books seemed like they were intended for a much younger audience, and probably wouldn't have much appeal to anyone older than about 10.

The type of plot, the silly dialogue, and the melodramatic turns made me think that this might have been awesome as a graphic novel. That's almost how I saw the story in my head as I was reading the book. The zeppelins with their grappling hooks, the machine that encased people in a state of suspended animation, the multiple fantastic locales and fairytale characters that were encountered... all of that would have been so much better in illustrated panels rather than pages of type.

But this is a novel, and due to the wrong choice of format, I can't recommend this book. It just didn't work.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Incredible read and first fiction novel! Jan. 8 2012
By Steven R. McEvoy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The premise of this book grabbed me right away, and to be honest, the whole series looks amazing. Rosemary Watson is seeing things. Characters seem to unfold into existence and they are after her, and they definitely want something from her. Soon, her brother Theo is home from school but he seems to be captured by a book. Rosemary soon realizes that the characters she is seeing, her brother's single-minded focus on a book, and her life turned upside down by Puck, the fairy shapeshifter from Shakespeare, appearing and trying to guide her, means she has not lost her mind but great things are at stake. Soon Puck, Rosemary and her new friend Peter McAllister, are lost in an adventure in the land of fiction.

The story had an amazing pace. Once you start reading it you will be hard- pressed to put it down. The characters were incredible, and the plot, mind-blowing. In many ways it is almost as if Madeleine L'Engle's two main series crossed paths in this book - Chronos, real world time and Kairos, other time, science fiction and fantasy have crossed paths. And much like Meg in the Kairos novels, Rosemary is a great heroine who discovers herself and grows into herself as the novel progresses. With reading, on average, over 100 books a year, there are lots of books I like, but few I absolutely love. This one falls into that second category.

I have had the pleasure of meeting James Bow on a few occasions in and around the University of Waterloo and other events in and around Kitchener/ Waterloo. I had heard the words genius and prodigy spoken about him on a few occasions and by different sources. But it was not until I read this book that I really glimpsed what they were talking about. This book was masterfully written. Of over 150 books I read this year, it is one of my favorites and one I keep thinking about even months later. I think it is a book Madeleine L'Engle would have loved reading; it seems like something she would have enjoyed. For teachers and students there are some great resources on James' website to supplement this book. All I can say is this book was amazing. I wish there were a way to give it more than 5 out of 5 stars! I look forward to the other two books in this series and hope the three fiction books he has in the works see the press soon.
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
You should read this one... Nov. 19 2006
By Stephen Clary - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Ever wonder what it would be like to be a hero in the Land of Fiction? Oh, sure it's exciting, but Rosemary and Peter discover that it can be pretty scary too. And telling yourself that the hero always wins in the end doesn't help you when you are being attacked by jaguars or knights with swords.

This book is well-written, fast-paced, and sometimes funny. The main characters are very likable.

I believe there is a sequel coming out soon--I'm looking forward to it.


Feedback