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The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip Hardcover – Mar 29 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 84 pages
  • Publisher: McSweeney's; 1 edition (March 29 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1932416374
  • ISBN-13: 978-1932416374
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 15.3 x 1.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 295 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #310,614 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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Format: Hardcover
"The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip" is truly delightful and funny and for readers of all ages. George Saunders creates a tale about a small village (of all of three houses) that live by a sea where the 5 little children go out three times a day to brush gappers off their goats, which supply the milk and literately the income of the village.
The characters of this story are truly amazing and so silly that it makes for an entertaining read. There is the main character Capable (who is indeed very capable) who lives with her widowed father who believes that everything should stay the same. The other two that families living in Frip, Mrs. Bea Romo (who also seems to be a widow although it isn't really mentioned in the story) who lives with her two sons Gilbert and Robert (who have an IQ of around 3.7) and Sid and Carol Ronsen and their two daughters (that believe that when they stand still they are very pretty) are truly weird and wacky and very silly. The gappers themselves are truly imaginative. They are little orange creatures that have multiple eyes and the IQ or 3.7 (the same as the two Romo boys). Their actions of jumping onto the goats and shrieking at high pitches are done with a reason that explains their character a little better. The characters help create develop the story into something truly remarkable with they attributes.
This story also has a lesson woven into its plot. Help others (and don't call people a snoot). That is what is needed to overcome the gapper problem of Frip; the families must overcome their own selfishness. This story is truly remarkable and is for all ages. It makes you laugh uncountable times (something that not every book can do), I would recommend it to anyone who enjoys a good laugh and great illustrations.
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Format: Hardcover
My sister gave me this book recently as a birthday present. Immediately I was struck by the bold, yet somewhat disturbing illustrations (the voodoo doll) that accompanied Saunders slight moral tale.
"The Very Persistent Gapper of Frip" tells the tale of the extremely small town of Frip, three families to be exact, who make their living raising goats and protecting their beloved economy from the gappers - bright orange shrieking creatures who love goats. If left to their own devices, the gappers will completely cover a goat and soon he will stop giving milk, therefore putting a halt to any sort of income for the three families. The children of the three families are responsible for brushing the numerous gappers from their goats at any given time of the day. The less-than-bright gappers settle their sights on the main character, Capable's goats. She has lost her mother and her father refuses to change (or to eat anything that isn't white) and so she is left alone to handle all the gappers of Frip since her neighbors believe her to be cursed. Seemingly alone, Capable must teach herself, her father, and her neighbors the true meaning of community (as well as how to overcome the persistent gappers).
"The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip," is a delightful and quick read even if it has a somewhat apparent purpose and moral. The illustrations by Lane Smith truly elevate this slight tale to an instant classic.
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Format: Hardcover
George Saunders, The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip (Villard, 2000)
Saunders (Pastoralia) and illustrator Lane Smith (The Stinky Cheese Man, James and the Giant Peach) team up to deliver this cautionary tale about helping your neighbors out of a jam. And while the story wears its moral far too plain on its face, the story itself, and the wonderfully twisted illustrations that accompany it, make it worth a read.
Capable and her father live in the very small town of Frip. It's so small, in fact, it only has three houses. Frip's whole economy is based on goat's milk. Which is all well and good, except for these odd little amphibians called gappers, who love goats, and shriek with joy when they see a goat. The shrieking makes the goats nervous, and causes them to stop giving milk. So life in Frip is a constant battle of keeping the gappers away from the goats.
Things get nasty when the gappers realize that Capable's house is the closest to the sea, and so they should all lavish their affections on Capable's herd. Which makes her neighbors very happy, since their goats are no longer plagued. They refuse to help her with her gappers, and thus the conflict at the center of the book is born.
This is exceptionally fun stuff. Perhaps having the Lane Smith illustrations put me more in mind of the late Roald Dahl than I otherwise would have been, but there is certainly a Dahl-esque feeling to Saunders' writing. Dahl was usually better at concealing his morals within the context of his stories (overly-moralizing oompah-loompahs excepted, of course), and so I have a hard time ranking Saunders with the best of Dahl's work. But it is a fine thing, and quite worth your time. ***
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Format: Hardcover
George Saunders, the master of quick-witted stories about a dystopic near-future that are despairing and hopeful at once, tries his hand at a children's book. He has not only succeeded, but has written one of the modern classics in children's literature.
The story of Capable and her father is movingly told, without sentimentality. Typically swift and effective characterization you find in Saunders' adult fiction can be found here, i.e. the father who barks at the sun to stay up, eats all his food after it's been dyed white because white rice is the last thing his wife ate before she died.
The main story of Capable having to fend off the gappers who threaten the entire stock of goats in her house and persevere the situation is told with incredible agility. The villains, the hilariously self-righteous Christian neighbors who refuse to help, are drawn with such surreal, but vivid force, that one cannot help but feel polarized at such disparity in grace given and not given to people, the apparent unfairness in the world. It makes you feel like a kid, once again, so unabashedly rooting for Capable and the good to overcome the hypocritical world.
Saunders opts for a gentle ending where everyone, including the neighbors, finds a harmonious way to live. The underlying hope and faith that present itself so ambiguously in Saunders' fiction are more openly expressed here.
All in all, a tremendously satisfying reading. If you are a fan of Saunders, or a well-told tale, you can't miss with this one. It is savagely funny as well as gently moving. Lane Smith's illustrations are uniformly gorgeous.
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