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The Visitors Original recording remastered, Import


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Oct. 16 2001)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered, Import
  • Label: Polygram
  • ASIN: B00005CDNK
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)

1. The Visitors
2. Head Over Heels
3. When All Is Said And Done
4. Soldiers
5. I Let The Music Speak
6. One Of Us
7. Two For The Price Of One
8. Slipping Through My Fingers
9. Like An Angel Passing Through My Room
10. Should I Laugh Or Cry
11. The Day Before You Came
12. Cassandra
13. Under Attack

Product Description

Product Description

A #29 album, released just months before ABBA disbanded in 1982. Hits include the title track and When All Is Said and Done .

Amazon.ca

Abba's 1981 swan song is appropriately touched by intimations of loss; The Visitors certainly contains nothing as breezy as "Does Your Mother Know". Far from the listless meanderings of a group on its way out, however, the album is alive with emotion and creativity. The title track fuses a melody reminiscent of the Beatles' Indian explorations with a smartly done synthesiser arrangement typical of the disc as a whole. Similarly moody cuts like "Soldiers" and "One of Us" help make this that rare thing, an Abba record suited for lonely late nights. This 24-bit remaster boasts four bonus cuts, including the final singles "The Day Before You Came" and "Under Attack", in addition to improved sound quality. --Rickey Wright

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By GoldfishNation on June 9 2004
Format: Audio CD
It is said that this album was something of a departure for the group. That this was not the ABBA people had come to know and love. No "Waterloo". Not a trace of a "Dancing Queen". However, it should be pointed out that this album is not exactly "ABBA does Death Metal".
The opener and title track is perhaps the closest they came to emulating the New Wave/Synth Pop explosion of the time. Parts of it are reminiscent of "Summer Night City" (minus the disco) and "Eagle" (without the majesty) but it manages to create an interesting and unsettling sonic landscape all of its own which suggests an encounter of the third kind may very well be waiting behind the locked door (and they must surely score points for creating a pop song about Russian dissidents).
Next up is "Head Over Heals" which treats us to its fairground synths, jaunty chorus and tale of 'goodtime girl gets herself into trouble'. This one is a bit like Agnetha's very own "Money Money Money" and lyrically is possibly a case of Björn, a la Fleetwood Mac, cheekily having his ex sing a song about herself that isn't altogether flattering. Possibly.
"When All is Said and Done" is a standout in the style of "The Winner Takes it All", although it is surprisingly upbeat for a break-up song (and sort of Christmassy) with a positively defiant lead vocal from Frida. A song of shaking hands and walking away, head held high. Bittersweet rather than just plain bitter. It would have made a good, upbeat album closer, and had serendipity played its part properly, the perfect send off for the group: "Thanks for all your generous love and thanks for all the fun ..."
"Soldiers" is, for me, the forgotten gem on this album.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By P. Lethbridge on Feb. 29 2004
Format: Audio CD
As Abba's last studio record, the band sent out a message to the world that they were no longer four, eternally smiling people who wanted to clobber us with bubbling, infectious pop music; rather now, they were telling us they meant business.
The interesting thing with the Abba catalogue is that you can hear their progression from one outting to the next. The Visitors is no exception--- it is infact, the most mature and progressive product they had ever done.
From the gloomy and lonely cover photo (gone are the bombastic outfits) which portrays them as four individual middle aged people looking off into a future without each other (indeed, by this point, the two couples were officially divorced)to the mood of the record's sombre notes, this is not your father's ABBA. The quality of the production, arrangements and performances helps this record, in my opinion, become a model for perfect pop productions. Arguably, a couple of the tracks crossed a line and moved past a traditional pop format (namely I Let the Music Speak and Like an Angel...) but with rich melodies and unparalleled vocal performances, they remain captivating.
This is a record where every member is in top form. Benny's melodies combined with his studio wiserdry, Bjorn's masterful English lyrics (showing a progression beyond anything he had ever written) and Agnetha's cool yet convincing story teller vocals shine beyond many of their earlier performances. But the true star here is Frida who brings a level of emotion and sophistication to her performances that we had never seen before. She manages to find her way through many different production and musical styles and stays believable and true through every note she sings.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John on June 3 2003
Format: Audio CD
The 24-bit remastering of the ABBA CD's is a HUGE letdown. The older CD's (the one's that came out originally) have a much brighter sound, but plenty full. They remind me of the original album sound. But the new discs sound too muddy or dark and the high end (which includes things like acoustic guitars and cymbals) are rather flat or dead sounding. Like my fellow reviewer from San Diego said, "save your money". Keep your old discs. They simply sound better in a side by side comparison. The box set sound quality is better than these 24-bit remastered discs.
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Format: Audio CD
Along with the much loved "Super Trouper" album, "The Visitor's" is one of ABBA's best original albums. It is the sound of a group that had matured and the end result is so alien to some people, that many may not even believe ABBA was capable of creating such dark, hauntingly beautiful poems set to ravishingly beautiful music.

The title track is a fascinating piece of work. The lyrics and chorus are interesting enough but Frida's solid, uncompromising vocals during the versus combined with the embellished synthesized sound transforms "The Visitors" in to one of ABBA's most unique and enduring songs.

Throughout ABBA's years as a group, Agnetha was chosen as the lead vocalist in several of their tear-jerker ballads; "Hasta Manana", "SOS, "My Love My Life", "Chiquitita", "Happy New Year", "The Winner Takes it All", "I've Been Waiting For You" and in "The Visitors" she's given several; "One of Us", "Soldiers", "Slipping Through My Fingers" and as an added bonus "The Day Before You Came". One of my favorites from this album is the hauntingly gorgeous "Soldiers". The lyrics recall a war-torn place and time and a sense of helplessness and dread are conjured up ("What's that sound what's the dreadful rumble?/Won't somebody tell me what I hear?/In the distance but drawing near/Is it only a storm approaching/All that thunder and the blinding light/In the winters night/In the grip of this cold December...") and Agnetha's sorrowful vocals add a touch of pathos to the already solemn atmosphere of the piece. The chorus is also worth mentioning because it's constructed almost like a tongue twister and the meaning of the phrase "Soldiers write the songs that soldiers sing/The songs that you and I don't/won't sing" isn't really clear.
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