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The West Wing Script Book Paperback – Jun 3 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 406 pages
  • Publisher: Newmarket Press (June 3 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557044996
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557044990
  • Product Dimensions: 15.4 x 2.1 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 454 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #365,860 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Aaron Sorkin serves as creator, writer, and executive producer on The West Wing. He previously created and executive-produced the ABC series Sports Night, and wrote the feature films The American President and A Few Good Men.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By William Gallagher on June 25 2002
Format: Paperback
Two very important things first: this has six scripts, not the eight it was planned to and it doesn't include the episode In Excelsis Deo; also, people who have claimed that the scripts are available online are mistaken. It appears that a version of the pilot is, but the rest are transcripts. That's like comparing a symphonic score to the instructions to key music into your mobile phone. These published scripts come complete not just with deft scene-setting but also errors that give you a sense of a working document and, reproduced here as they were given to the cast, their inate sense of pacing and rhythm is kept. It's difficult not to hear the cast's voices as you read but that's a measure of how distinctive each character is and the scripts work quite marvellously on their own. Then, too, Sorkin's introduction and later short notes probably contain more information than we've had on The West Wing DVD extras here in England and if there's anything you'd wish for in the book, it would just be for a Volume 2.
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Format: Paperback
Whoever thought of the idea of portraying the White House environment and its operations was truly brilliant. It is by far the most significant impact upon politics in the last 100 years if not since the creation of the nation. The ability to assess the dynamics of integrated factors and people by demystifying the office and its methods is by far its greatest contribution to American patriotism, as well as to define the obligations and problems which occur there - for any President. Its appeal to young and old alike show the power of illustration. Coming as it did near the end of the Clinton administration, it would have been wonderful to view the complications of his Presidency during it to help appreciate the criticism of Janet Reno, Madeline Albright, Robert Reich, Robert Rubin or any of the other persons who passed through that period. Viewing Stephanopoulous within that context comes rather automatic even now, in 2004, in reflection. It might also have been useful to more clearly evaluate the impact of the first female press secretary who was fired from there at the time, in light of the current makeup of the show. As it is, the most obvious benefits have accrued to the Bush White House, however, since the understanding brought to the American people because of it may prevent the degree of animosity that existed within the Clnton White House at the time, for whatever reason. To the extent that it continues to be an inspiration, as well as an adequate forum in which to air the complexity of issues, how they are handled, and how they might be handled, remains to be seen.Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
The episodes presented in "The West Wing Script Book" were obviously chosen because they have two strong points in common. First, these are the scripts which introduce each main character in "The West Wing" and which tell the stories of how each came to travel the road that brought them to work together in Washington. Second, the scripts contain the most powerful scenes that reveal the personalities of the characters. The book includes those pivotal events such as the President's flashbacks about his relationship with his father, Toby's moral dilemma in finding out about the President's MS, Josh and Donna's reasons why each depends on the other, Sam's accidental tryst with a call girl and C.J.'s damage control with the press, Ainsley's anti-ERA speech, and Charlie's initial job interview to name only a few.
If you're a "West Wing" fan, you can now fully digest the subtlety and cleverness of the writing you may have missed during the rapid-fire pace of the show. If you are not a fan, this book is a good introduction to the dynamics of the cast and the premise of the show. These are the episodes that not only "let Bartlett be Bartlett," they are the ones that show the entire cast at its best.
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Format: Paperback
If you're smart, surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you. This quote from Sorkin's earlier, wonderful TV venture "Sports Night" appears in the introduction to this book of teleplays from the best show in the history of TV. I'm not trying to suck up to anybody or anything, I mean that sincerely. Even if you don't plan on voting for Bartlet in the next election, there has never been a show like The West Wing but I hope, I hope, I hope that there will be more. This show proves that TV can be something more than a dumbed down interpretation of "average America" designed by networks to keep their audiences as stupid as possible. With the West Wing on the air, we have a higher order of television to live up to. As the program itself references animosity toward Bartlet because he's an intellectual snob, but their point is my point. We shouldn't be ashamed of intelligence. We shouldn't try and lower ourselves to the level of others. We should be raising our standards, otherwise how can we grow as a people? And even if you didn't go to an Ivy League school like most of the cast of characters did, you can still enjoy their company for an hour every Wednesday, or in these scripts by the greatest writer of our time, Aaron Sorkin. If you're stupid, surround yourself with smart people. Why not these people?
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