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The Wife Trap: A Novel [Mass Market Paperback]

Tracy Anne Warren

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Book Description

April 25 2006
Your presence is requested at a wedding deception.

After orchestrating a scandalous high-society ruse, Lady Jeannette Brantford is banished from her family’s estate in England and sent to live with boring elderly cousins in the Irish countryside. But Jeannette’s exile is surprisingly eventful. En route to her dreaded destination, she encounters Darragh O’Brien, a devilishly handsome architect who transforms Jeannette’s punishment into a delicious whirlwind of wits, words, and undeniable passion.

Although no less than a duke could satisfy a lady of her status, Jeannette is unable to extinguish the burning desire she has for Darragh’s smoldering looks and sizzling kisses. Little does she know, her dashing Irishman is no commoner. He’s the eleventh Earl of Mulholland–and he’s thoroughly enjoying the irresistible game of hard-to-get. But before he reveals his true identity, a little temptation and trickery are in order to teach his fair lady a lesson or two about love.

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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Ivy Books (April 25 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 034548309X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345483096
  • Product Dimensions: 2.8 x 10.8 x 17.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 204 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #429,436 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Tracy Anne Warren is the author of The Husband Trap. She grew up in a small central Ohio town. After working for a number of years in finance, she quit her day job to pursue her first love–writing romance novels. Warren lives in Maryland with a pair of exuberant, young Siamese cats and windows full of gorgeous orchids and African violets. When she’s not writing, she enjoys reading, watching movies, and dreaming up the characters for her next book. Visit her website at www.tracyannewarren.com.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter One


Ireland, June 1817

Lady Jeannette Rose Brantford gently blew her nose on her handkerchief. Neatly refolding the silk square with its pretty row of embroidered lily of the valley, she dabbed at the fresh pair of tears that slid down her cheeks.

I really need to stop crying, she told herself. This unremitting misery simply has to cease.

On the sea voyage over, she’d thought she had her emo- tions firmly under control. Resigned, as it were, to her ignominious fate. But this morning when the coach set off on the overland journey to her cousins’ estate, the reality of her situation had crashed upon her like one of the great boulders that lay scattered around the wild Irish countryside.

How could my parents have done this to me? she wailed to herself. How could they have been cruel enough to exile her to this godforsaken wilderness? Dear heavens, even Scotland would have been preferable. At least its landmass had the good sense to still be attached to Mother England. Scotland would have been a long carriage ride from home, but in Ireland, she was separated by an entire sea!

Yet Mama and Papa had remained adamant in their decision to send her here. And for the first time in her twenty-one years, she’d been unable to wheedle or cajole or cry her way into persuading them to change their minds.

She didn’t even have her longtime lady’s maid, Jacobs, to offer her comfort and consolation in her time of need. Just because she had told Jacobs a little fib about her identity when she and her twin sister, Violet, had decided to exchange places last summer was no cause for desertion. And just because Jeannette’s parents were punishing her for the scandal with this intolerable banishment to Ireland was no reason for Jacobs to seek out a new post. A loyal servant would have been eager to follow her mistress into exile!

Jeannette wiped away another tear and gazed across the coach at her new maid, Betsy. Despite being a perfectly sweet, pleasant girl, Betsy was a stranger. Not only that, she was woefully inexperienced, still learning about the proper care of clothing and dressing hair and recognizing the latest fashions. Jacobs had known it all.

Jeannette sighed.

Oh, well, she thought, training Betsy would give her new life purpose. At the reminder of her new life, tears welled again into her eyes.

Alone. Oh, she was so dreadfully alone.

Abruptly, the coach jerked to a tooth-rattling halt. She slid forward and nearly toppled to the floor in a cloud of skirts.

Betsy caught her; or rather, they caught each other, and slowly settled themselves back into their seats.

“Good heavens, what was that?” Jeannette straightened her hat, barely able to see with the brim half covering her eyes.

“It felt like we hit something, my lady.” Betsy twisted to peer out the small window at the gloomy landscape beyond. “I hope we weren’t in no accident.”

The coach swayed as the coachman and footmen jumped to the ground, the low rumble of male voices filling the air.

Jeannette gripped her handkerchief inside her palm. Drat it, what now? As if things weren’t bad enough already.

A minute later, the coachman’s wizened face and sloped shoulders appeared at the window. “I’m sorry, milady, but it appears we’re stuck.”

Jeannette’s eyebrows rose. “What do you mean, stuck?”

“ ’Tis the weather, my lady. All the rain of late has turned the road back to bog.”

Bog? As in big-wheel-sucking-muddy-hole kind of bog? A wail rose into her throat. She swallowed the cry and firmed her lower lip, refusing to let it so much as quiver.

“Jem and Samuel and me’ll keep trying,” the coachman continued, “but it may be a while afore we’re on our way. Perhaps you’d like to step out while we . . .”

She shot him an appalled look, so appalled obviously that his words trailed abruptly into silence.

What was wrong with the man? she wondered. Was he daft? Or blind, perhaps? Could he not see her beautiful Naccarat traveling dress? The shade bright and pretty as a perfect tangerine. Or the stylish kid leather half boots she’d had dyed especially to match prior to her departure from London? Obviously he had no common sense, nor any appreciation of the latest styles. But mayhap she was being too hard on him, since, after all, what did any man really know about ladies’ fashion.

“Step out to where? Into that mud?” She gave her head a vigorous shake. “I shall wait right where I am.”

“It may get a might rough once we start pushing, my lady. There’s your safety to consider.”

“Don’t worry about my safety. I shall be fine in the coach. If you need to lighten the load, however, you have my leave to remove my trunks. But please be sure not to set them into the mud. I shall be most distressed if they are begrimed or damaged in any manner.” She waved a gloved hand. “And Betsy may step down if she wishes.”

Betsy looked uncertain. “Are you sure, my lady? I don’t think I ought to leave you.”

“It’s fine, Betsy. There is nothing you can do here anyway, so go with John.”

Besides, Jeannette moaned to herself, it will be nothing new, since I am well used to being deserted these days.

The gray-haired man fixed a pair of kindly eyes on the servant girl. “Best you come with me. I’ll see ye to a safe spot.”

Once Betsy was lifted free of the coach and the worst of the mud, the barouche’s door was firmly relatched. The servants set about unloading the baggage, then began the grueling task of trying to dislodge the vehicle’s trapped wheels.

A full half hour passed with no success. Jeannette stubbornly kept her seat, faintly queasy from the vigorous, periodic rocking of the coach as the men and horses strained to force the carriage out of its hole. From the exclamations of annoyed disgust that floated on the air, puncturing the rustic silence, she gathered their attempts had done nothing but sink the wheels even deeper into the mire.

Withdrawing a fresh handkerchief from her reticule, she patted the perspiration from her forehead. Blazing from above, the sun had burned off the clouds but was doing little to dry the muddy morass around her. Afternoon heat ripened the air, turning it sticky with a humidity that was unusual for these parts even in mid-summer, or so she had been informed.

At least she wasn’t crying anymore. A blessing, since it wouldn’t do to arrive at her cousins’ house—assuming she ever did arrive—looking bloated and puffy, her eyes damp and red-rimmed. It was humiliating enough knowing what her cousins must think of her banishment. A far worse ignominy to greet them looking anything but her best.

A fly buzzed into the coach, fat and black and repugnant.

Jeannette’s lip curled with distaste. She shooed at the insect with her handkerchief, hoping it would fly out the opposite window. Instead it turned and raced straight for her head. She let out a sharp squeal and batted at it again.

Buzzing past her nose, it landed on the window frame, its transparent wings glinting in the brilliant sunlight. The insect strolled casually along the painted wooden sill on tensile, hair-thin legs.

With equal nonchalance, Jeannette reached for her fan. She waited, running an assessing thumb over the fine gilded ivory side guard. As soon as the creature paused, Jeannette brought her fan down with an audible thwap.

In a single instant, the big black bug became a big black blob. Gratified by her small victory, she inspected her fan, hoping she had not damaged the delicate staves, since the fan had always been one of her favorites.

Catching a fresh glimpse of the squashed insect, she twisted her lips in revulsion before quickly flicking the carcass out of her sight.

“You’ve a deadly aim, lass,” remarked a mellow male voice, the lilting cadence as rich and lyrical as an Irish ballad. “He didn’t stand a chance, that fly. Are you as handy with a real weapon?”

Startled, she turned her head to find a stranger peering in at her through the opposite window, one strong forearm propped at an impertinent angle atop the frame.

How long had he been standing there? she wondered. Long enough obviously to witness the encounter between her and the fly.

The man was tall and sinewy with close-cropped, wavy dark chestnut hair, fair skin and penetrating eyes of the bluest blue, vivid as gentians at peak bloom. They twinkled at her, those eyes, the man making no effort to conceal his roguish interest. His lips curved upward in silent, unconcealed humor.

Devilish handsome.

The description popped unbidden and unwanted into her mind, his appeal impossible to deny. Her heart flipped then flopped inside her chest, breasts rising and falling beneath the material of her bodice in sudden breathless movement.

Gracious sakes.

She struggled against the involuntary response, forcing herself to notice on closer observation that his features were not precisely perfect. His forehead square and rather ordinary. His nose a bit long, a tad hawkish. His chin blunt and far too stubborn for comfort. His lips a little on the slender side.

Yet when viewed as a whole, his countenance made an undeniably pleasing package, one to which no sane woman could claim indifference. And when coupled with the magnetism that radiated off him in almost visible ...

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  28 reviews
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unappealing heroine July 20 2006
By MNix - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
Jeannette Brantford caused a huge scandal with her twin sister Violet in England when they traded places after Jeannette refused to marry Adrian Winter. Violet and Adrian are now very happily married but Jeannette has been sent to Ireland to wait out the scandal. Along the way her coach becomes stuck in the mud and Darragh O'Brien comes to the rescue.

Jeannette thinks Darragh is very handsome, but he is rude and certainly no gentleman. Jeannette has no intention of fraternizing with any one she believes to be below her station. Also, she fled her engagement to Adrian because she thought herself in love with another man, but she was crushed when he dumped her. Jeannette now intends to marry for money and title.

Darragh finds the beautiful Jeannette intriguing. Although they continually spar with each other, they are also secretly very attracted to each other. Nothing can come of their affections though, because they are from two very different worlds. Even a few stolen kisses can't change who they are and what they want. After being caught in a compromising position, Darragh and Jeannette are forced to marry. Darragh is really a titled Earl but he keeps his status a secret from Jeannette because he wants her to love him, not his money. As time goes by Darragh worries though, that asking Jeannette to love him without giving her the possessions she desires may be too much to ask of his wife.

The Wife Trap left me with mixed feelings. Although I think the storyline is clever, try as I might, I cannot understand what Darragh sees in Jeannette. Darragh is roguishly handsome, charming and witty but Jeannette is rude, snobbish and nasty. I adored Darragh but I whole-heartedly disliked Jeannette. She has no redeeming qualities whatsoever and she does not deserve a man as good as Darragh. In my opinion, Darragh is truly trapped with Jeannette as his wife. With the exception of Jeannette, The Wife Trap has all the makings of a wonderful romance. Unfortunately though, Jeannette is with Darragh and therefore the book lost its appeal for me.

Nannette

Reviewed for Joyfully Reviewed
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Book Jan. 6 2009
By Krista Porter - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This book was a real page turner. I read the entire trilogy in 3 days. 1 each day! I love the way that Tracy Warren describest the settings and the characters. Great Book!!!!!
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good story, bad main character... June 1 2006
By Reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I have to say, I was a little wary of reading The Wife Trap after learning that it centered around the selfish Jeannette, who had abandoned her fiance in the previous novel. While I don't enjoy books with the perfect heroine, I also don't like reading stories with flaky main characters like Jeannette.

The problem is that we are meant to believe that Jeannette, a woman given to throwing temper tantrums, is actually a quiet soul with a penchant for painting and long walks. Highly doubtful. Ms. Warren is a very good writer, and delivers a well-written and humorous novel. However, without a likable heroine, the story is not nearly as good as it could have been.
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jeanette's self indulgent pity party is just too funny to resist. Jan. 27 2007
By C. Dionne - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Jeanette Brantford did not want to get married and talked her twin sister, Violet, into taking her place as the bride for what should have been her own wedding. Once the deception was discovered, as punishment, Jeanette's parents banished her from England to stay with her elderly cousins in Ireland. She's just sure that she'll wither away to nothing. Even her maid has abandoned Jeanette in her time of need. Rather than accompany her into exile in the wilderness of Ireland, Jacobs sought employment elsewhere.

Irishman Darragh O'Brien is no commoner. He's the eleventh Earl of Mulholland. Instead of marrying for money he chose to labor as an architect in order to restore his family estate and support his mother and siblings. Of course, Jeanette isn't aware of his gentry status, and he fully intends to use that fact to learn is she has true feelings for him.

Jeanette thought that being exiled to Ireland was the worst thing that had ever happened to her - until she met Darragh. This baseborn man insults her, has the audacity to laugh at her, and horror of all horrors, he has absolutely no respect for her station in life. He also intrigues and excites her like no other man. Of course, her being the highborn lady that she is, Jeanette could never marry such a commoner. Indulging in a little harmless flirting, heated looks, and stolen kisses should satisfy her fascination with him. It is Darragh's own fault that her every waking thought is consumed with either him or returning to England. After all, it is his workmen that awaken her every morning at the unholy hour of six with their work on Jeanette's cousins' home. It may be perfectly acceptable to these uncouth people but Jeanette is a lady of refinement and must both maintain her normal schedule and get the proper amount of sleep. Politely asking Darragh to have his crew start work a little later in the day was just as politely refused. Darragh sees Jeanette for the selfish, self-indulgent woman she's always accepted as her right and he's having none of it. It's a battle of wills that will have him alternately wanting to strangle or kiss her.

THE WIFE TRAP is the second book in Tracy Anne Warren's back-to back trilogy which also consists of THE HUSBAND TRAP and THE WEDDING TRAP. In a nutshell, these books are simply delightful. Each one can be read separately but they do have interconnecting characters so reading all three books really does make it more fun. I couldn't help but smile my way through the pages of THE WIFE TRAP, Jeanette's self indulgent pity party is just too funny to resist. She's so convinced everything important in life is in England and revolves around her place in society that it's simply delightful to imagine Darragh not cave into her demands and not allow her to get away with her childish stunts.

Chrissy Dionne (courtesy of Romance Junkies)
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars least favorite of the trilogy June 19 2006
By san - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
The writing style is great but i just could not get over the heroine's spoiled brat attitude and she had no other redeeming qualities to recommend her. It's a wonder that the hero would even fall in love with someone so obnoxious. It was the heroine that made this story unpalatable.

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