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The Wind from the Sun Paperback – Sep 1990


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Gollancz; New edition edition (September 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0575048425
  • ISBN-13: 978-0575048423
  • Product Dimensions: 17.3 x 11.2 x 1.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 113 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Product Description

About the Author

Arthur C. Clarke was born in 1917. He has been writing science fiction since the late 40s. His seventieth birthday, in December 1987, was marked by the unveiling of a plaque at his birthplace in Somerset; he was knighted in 1998 for his services to literature, shortly after his eightieth birthday, the first science fiction writer to be thus honoured. --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
Clarke's stories are an examination of how people will deal with future technologies. They are largely open ended and create a scene around the science, a framework into which the reader can immerse himself. It's a very unique style, and one that can take getting used to. The overall effect is very wistful.
The stories here cover sailboat racing (aluminum sails in the solar wind); marooned ships (after launching from the Moon); voyages of discovery to Jupiter, using fusion powered hot air balloons. This is classic SF from a master, showing us how different things will be regardless of which direction the future takes, while the human factors will remain the same. Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose...
These stories are quick, thought-provoking and not burdened with angst or attempts at deep meaning. They are stories of people living their lives, or dying, against backgrounds somewhat familiar and strikingly strange. Every student of classic SF should have this in their library.
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Format: Hardcover
Clarke's stories are an examination of how people will deal with future technologies. They are largely open ended and create a scene around the science, a framework into which the reader can immerse himself. It's a very unique style, and one that can take getting used to. The overall effect is very wistful.
The stories here cover sailboat racing (aluminum sails in the solar wind); marooned ships (after launching from the Moon); voyages of discovery to Jupiter, using fusion powered hot air balloons. This is classic SF from a master, showing us how different things will be regardless of which direction the future takes, while the human factors will remain the same. Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose...
These stories are quick, meaningful and not burdened with angst or attempts at deep meaning. They are stories of people living their lives, or dying, against backgrounds somewhat familiar and strikingly strange. Every student of classic SF should have this in their library.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is an interesting collection of Clarke's short stories. Being written by one of the best science fiction authors of our age, the least someone can expect is to have great fun reading them.
Some of the stories, though, are really short, therefore they don't have much development, being just interesting concepts and mind teasers.
The longer ones are mostly the struggle of one central character against some hazard or life threat, based on scientifical facts used to develop the whole plot.
Since Clarke wrote those stories between the sixties and early seventies, it's also interesting to see what expections people related to science had thiry or forty years ago, and notice that science developments had taken a totaly different turn, now mostly applied to our day-to-day life.
In all, this book is less complex than other Clarke books, like "Songs from distant Earth", or "Rendezvous with Rama", and easier to read, but not more enjoyable. Read it to complete your Clarke-knowledge.
Grade 8.0/10
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By A Customer on Oct. 12 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I love to read a good short story. My favorite is the type where the end is so surprising that it changes your point of view about the entire story. A second reading shows the story in a totally different light. This book is filled with such stories, and is a rare pleasure to read.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Some good stories Aug. 4 2001
By Bill R. Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Although it's not Arthur C. Clarke's best short story collection, there are some good stories here. A lot of them are merely harmless, playful ditties that Clarke probably had some fun coming up with (The Food of The Gods, Love That Universe, Dial F For Frankenstein, The Longest Science-Fiction Story Ever Told, Herbert George Morley Robert Wells, esq., etc.) that don't, perhaps, have that much lasting literary value, but they are still ACC, and good. A lot of these stories are notable and fun to read due to their surprise endings. You will marvel at Clarke's ability to do this. Some of the best cuts from this book include the title story (which has launched quite a scientific following), Reunion, and the multitple award-winning novella A Meeting With Medusa which is an undeniable Clarke classic that almost makes the book worth buying on it's merit alone. A Clarke fan will want to own this book.
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Excellent collection of short stories Oct. 12 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I love to read a good short story. My favorite is the type where the end is so surprising that it changes your point of view about the entire story. A second reading shows the story in a totally different light. This book is filled with such stories, and is a rare pleasure to read.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Interesting atmosphere June 23 2004
By Michael Z. Williamson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Clarke's stories are an examination of how people will deal with future technologies. They are largely open ended and create a scene around the science, a framework into which the reader can immerse himself. It's a very unique style, and one that can take getting used to. The overall effect is very wistful.
The stories here cover sailboat racing (aluminum sails in the solar wind); marooned ships (after launching from the Moon); voyages of discovery to Jupiter, using fusion powered hot air balloons. This is classic SF from a master, showing us how different things will be regardless of which direction the future takes, while the human factors will remain the same. Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose...
These stories are quick, thought-provoking and not burdened with angst or attempts at deep meaning. They are stories of people living their lives, or dying, against backgrounds somewhat familiar and strikingly strange. Every student of classic SF should have this in their library.
A decent collection, but not Clarke's strongest Nov. 3 2009
By Josh Mauthe - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A solid collection of Clarke's short story output during the 1960s. As a collection, it's not as solid as The Nine Billion Names of God, which was more of a "best of" collection; nonetheless, it's a lot of fun to read through, and nicely demonstrates Clarke's skill at sci-fi, whether it's epic in scope or even light and fun. There's a lot of Clarke's "stinger" stories here (stories with that closing last line that either twists everything or provides the whopper of a conclusion), and they're fun, but more impressive are some of his more luxurious, relaxed stories. The title story, for instance, details a remarkable race on solar winds, and Clarke's patience and grasp not only of pacing but also of the beauties of his world give the story a remarkable feel. The collection ends with "A Meeting with Medusa," a story that reminded me a lot of Lovecraft's "At the Mountains of Madness" - not as a horror tale, but more as an exploration of an utterly alien land, with loving detail that truly creates an image for the reader. If you can find The Nine Billion Names of God, it's a better collection, but you could do far worse than this for a demonstration of why Clarke is such an essential name in science fiction.
Interesting short stories Aug. 14 2002
By J R Zullo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is an interesting collection of Clarke's short stories. Being written by one of the best science fiction authors of our age, the least someone can expect is to have great fun reading them.
Some of the stories, though, are really short, therefore they don't have much development, being just interesting concepts and mind teasers.
The longer ones are mostly the struggle of one central character against some hazard or life threat, based on scientifical facts used to develop the whole plot.
Since Clarke wrote those stories between the sixties and early seventies, it's also interesting to see what expections people related to science had thiry or forty years ago, and notice that science developments had taken a totaly different turn, now mostly applied to our day-to-day life.
In all, this book is less complex than other Clarke books, like "Songs from distant Earth", or "Rendezvous with Rama", and easier to read, but not more enjoyable. Read it to complete your Clarke-knowledge.
Grade 8.0/10


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