The Wisdom Way of Knowing and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 15.03
  • List Price: CDN$ 21.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 6.96 (32%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Wisdom Way of Knowing... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Wisdom Way of Knowing: Reclaiming An Ancient Tradition to Awaken the Heart Hardcover – Oct 13 2003


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 15.03
CDN$ 10.75 CDN$ 9.37

Summer Clearance on Books Books That Make You Think


Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • You'll save an extra 5% on Books purchased from Amazon.ca, now through July 9th. No code necessary, discount applied at checkout. Here's how (restrictions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

The Wisdom Way of Knowing: Reclaiming An Ancient Tradition to Awaken the Heart + The Wisdom Jesus: Transforming Heart and Mind--A New Perspective on Christ and His Message + The Holy Trinity and the Law of Three: Discovering the Radical Truth at the Heart of Christianity
Price For All Three: CDN$ 44.02

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together



Product Details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (Oct. 13 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 078796896X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0787968960
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.8 x 18.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 227 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #123,423 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

"a bold and visionary work." (Spirituality & Health, May/June, 2004)

Review

"Drawing on resources as diverse as Sufism, Benedictine Monasticism, the Gurdjieff Work, and the string theory of modern physics, Cynthia Bourgeault has crafted her own unique vision of the Wisdom way in this very accessible book, nicely balanced between concept and practice."
— Gerald May, senior fellow, Shalem Institute, and author, Addiction and Grace and Will and Spirit

"The spiritual wisdom and practical suggestions in this lively and beautiful book will be helpful to many who find themselves setting out on the interior journey."
— Bruno Barnhart, a Camaldolese monk and author, Second Simplicity: The Inner Shape of Christianity

"Cynthia Bourgeault's book is a valuable contribution to the much-needed reawakening of spiritual practice within a Christian context. Her sincerity, good sense, metaphysical depth, and broad experience make her a source to be trusted."
— Kabir Helminski, Sufi Shaikh, the Threshold Society

"This book is a precious gem, a short and brilliant synthesis of the world's great wisdom traditions. Clear, concise, inspiring and poetic."
— Joan Borysenko, author, Inner Peace for Busy People and Inner Peace for Busy Women

"With consummate skill and dazzling clarity, Cynthia Bourgeault rescues the ancient knowledge of wisdom practices found in all the great traditions and teaches us how to become true instruments of God's glory."
— Toinette Lippe, author, Nothing Left Over: A Plain and Simple Life


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
First Sentence
"What is truth? You can see where there is truth and where there isn't, but I seem to have lost my sight, I see nothing." Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ray Barnes on Feb. 6 2004
Format: Hardcover
If you are a student of the Gnosis and want to learn more about it, and about mysticism within the Western Wisdom traditions, this is as good a place to start as anything. Unlike some other literature of this kind of subject, it is clear, lucid and very readable. The author is an ordained Episcopal priest, but esoteric Christianity is to her I believe a piece of a bigger puzzle, and a frame of reference in particular. She quotes a bit from other enlightened authors, past and present, such as Jakob Boehme. There is also an excellent recommended reading list for further study.
The book is short but covers a great deal of ground in little time, so kudos here for the editing.
Recommended with enthusiasm.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Linda A. Elston on March 12 2004
Format: Hardcover
I have read Cynthia Bourgeault's THE WISDOM WAY OF KNOWING five times now. From start to finish, I find what I always find in her writing - the rich, inner tradition of Christianity which is so universally appealing. I have probably read her chapter on Freedom and Surrender ten times, and I quote my favorite lines, "Spirituality at its no-frills simplest is learning not to do anything in a state of internal brace. It is never worth the cost."
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I concur with Ray's review above that this is a well written & edited volume that I found completely captivating. Although it does lack in detail and left many questions unanswered for me, I still felt that it outlined the story of "wisdom" in western Christianity in a way that brought many pieces of my learning together. In particular Bourgeault highlights the core similarities of the world's major faiths in terms of the "path" that the great spiritual leaders followed and taught. Highly recommended!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book presents a great opportunity to explore the roots of the Wisdom tradition in a clear and understandable format. Cynthia is one of my favourite authors today. A very good read.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 48 reviews
112 of 113 people found the following review helpful
A small treatise on radical transformation May 1 2009
By Ruth Henriquez Lyon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book won't appeal to those who believe that our rational mind is the source of our greatest meaning and truth. For, according to the ancient tradition known as Wisdom, the human mind's full scope includes heights and depths which rationality can never encompass. Neglecting these other regions of our being leads to a limited state of mind, known by the Wisdom tradition as sleep. Yes, that's right, the more invested we are in our intellect, our ego, and our attempts at logical control of the world around us, the more asleep we really are.

This book is about waking from that sleep. And Bourgeault, an ordained Episcopal priest, has written it very clearly and rationally. Which is fitting, since to find wholeness we want to expand our minds beyond rationality, not do away with it. Bourgeault's particular gift here is her ability to teach about the Wisdom tradition from an interfaith perspective, without presenting too much information about too many different religious paths. For Wisdom cannot be claimed exclusively by any path; rather, it underlies all the great paths to inner knowledge. Bourgeault organizes her material by focusing on the kernel of truths shared by the Christian, Jewish, and Sufi traditions.

She defines Wisdom, at the start of the book, as "a precise and comprehensive science of spiritual transformation that has existed since the headwaters of the great world religions and is in fact their common ground." And yet, even though this "science" appears worldwide, it has, in many cultures, been lost or watered down over the millennia for various reasons. In the second chapter, "How the Christian West Lost Its Wisdom," the author examines how in the early fourth century, the Christian Church changed its approach to spirituality, substituting "doctrinal mantras" for a direct, heart-centered encounter with Jesus. She then describes how in Medieval Europe, the Wisdom tradition didn't die, but rather took shelter underground, where it came up for air via outlets such as the arts, literature, and the teachings of esoteric groups.

After this historical chapter, the remainder of the book focuses on the process of spiritual transformation. In the chapter entitled "Three-Centered Knowing," she discusses in depth practices for balancing mind, heart, and body. She has some wonderful insights, like "trying to find faith with the intellectual center is something like trying to play a violin with a saw: it's simply the wrong tool for the job." She also presents a different definition of what she means by the term "heart" than the one many of us might know. Rather than the seat of feelings, passions, and emotions, in Wisdom teachings the heart is "an organ for the perception of divine purpose and beauty. It is our antenna. . .[it] is not for personal expression but for divine perception." That does not mean that we must suppress the emotions. But we do learn that it's advantageous to not let them dominate us.

Of all the teachings in this book, I found her chapter on surrender the most radical, and by "radical" I mean having the potential for re-forming us at the deepest layers of our being. She writes,
". . .in any situation in life, confronted by an outer threat or opportunity, you can notice yourself responding inwardly in one of two ways. Either you will brace, harden and resist, or you will soften, open, and yield. If you go with the former gesture, you will be catapulted immediately into your smaller self, with its animal instincts and survival responses. If you stay with the latter regardless of the outer conditions, you will remain in alignment with your innermost being, and through it, divine being can reach you. Spiritual practice at its no-frills simplest is a moment-by-moment learning not to do anything in a state of internal brace."

She makes a good point, but it's a hard teaching to learn to do. And for that reason, she discusses other practices that help us learn. Some of these practices, like centering prayer and lectio divina, are for Christian seekers. Others, like chanting and meditation, have a place in a great many traditions.

Bourgeault's book is short (120 pages), but she packs a lot into it. The book ends with a section on further resources for the different practices she recommends, as well as a good bibliography (with comments) that should keep you going further in your reading for a long time. It's a good resource for people just setting out on a spiritual path, as well as people who've been travelling for some time.
83 of 84 people found the following review helpful
Clarity, Depth and, yes, Wisdom March 30 2006
By Carleton B. Bakkum - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
An Episcopal priest myself, time and again while reading "The Wisdom Way of Knowing" I wanted to jump up, rejoice and exclaim, "Yes, this is what I've come to about Christianity after all these years!" It was like drinking draughts of crystal clear water. With a graceful touch, the author peels back layer after layer of accretions to the faith to leave one close to the pulsing heart of the tradition. She obviously lives this path and warrants the name "teacher." Do read this book. And practice the prayer and path to which it points. (Couldn't resist a little sermon.)
100 of 104 people found the following review helpful
Freedom and Surrender March 12 2004
By Linda A. Elston - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I have read Cynthia Bourgeault's THE WISDOM WAY OF KNOWING five times now. From start to finish, I find what I always find in her writing - the rich, inner tradition of Christianity which is so universally appealing. I have probably read her chapter on Freedom and Surrender ten times, and I quote my favorite lines, "Spirituality at its no-frills simplest is learning not to do anything in a state of internal brace. It is never worth the cost."
72 of 77 people found the following review helpful
short but terrific Feb. 6 2004
By Ray Barnes - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
If you are a student of the Gnosis and want to learn more about it, and about mysticism within the Western Wisdom traditions, this is as good a place to start as anything. Unlike some other literature of this kind of subject, it is clear, lucid and very readable. The author is an ordained Episcopal priest, but esoteric Christianity is to her I believe a piece of a bigger puzzle, and a frame of reference in particular. She quotes a bit from other enlightened authors, past and present, such as Jakob Boehme. There is also an excellent recommended reading list for further study.
The book is short but covers a great deal of ground in little time, so kudos here for the editing.
Recommended with enthusiasm.
30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
The Inestimable Value of Rediscovering the Wisdom of the Heart Aug. 30 2007
By Dr. Richard G. Petty - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a wonderful book for anyone interested in meditation and contemplation.

The author is an Episcopal priest and retreat leader, but her message and her sources stretch well beyond the Christian world.

The book begins with a challenging forward by Thomas Moore. Who asks us to challenge some of the assumptions built powerfully into he roots of the modern world: that the best - perhaps only - way to understand something is to dissect it; that standardized education is the best way to educate the young and that prisons are an effective way to deal with crime. Each is questionable.

Cynthia takes these questions and many others in this beautifully written and satisfying book.

As an example, she takes the words:
Individual
Freedom
Happiness
Surrender

Each is deeply charged with meaning in our Western culture. The same words also have deep meanings in our spiritual heritage. The interesting thing is that in the two realms the words have diametrically opposite meanings.

It is very valuable to see and understand this: many people want to embark upon their spiritual journey without knowing what it entails. I once saw a man who came to an introductory presentation by a well-known teacher. He got very upset when it was suggested that the work would need some sacrifice, discipline and effort. He was not being asked to give a lot of money to the teacher, in fact quite the opposite. But he thought that the spiritual path was a shortcut for getting more "stuff." Cynthia demonstrates the fallacy of this belief.

She also shows that the genuine spiritual path is available to anyone who is prepared to dedicate a little time to it. And "little" is the operative word, and one of the reasons that I so like this book She points out quite correctly that meditation or contemplation should start with a few minutes wherever you are. I was also thrilled to see someone else advocate the value of practicing surrender wherever you find yourself: standing in line or sitting in traffic is a good place to start.

This is a short but deep and inspiring book that I recommend very highly.


Feedback