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The Women and the Warlords Paperback – Mar 1 1989


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 284 pages
  • Publisher: Colin Smythe Ltd; New edition edition (March 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0861402650
  • ISBN-13: 978-0861402656
  • Product Dimensions: 22.1 x 14.6 x 3.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 449 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,585,343 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
This is undoubtly the darkest and least "heroic" book in Hugh Cook's series: "Chronicles of an Age of Darkness", but it is a great read nonetheless. If you've ever wondered just how tough life would actually be for a women in a "realistic" medieval/fantasy world, look no further. The book never softens its grimly realistic tone by making artifical concessions to political correctness (which, in most modern fantasies, dictates that women should never be at a disadvantage to men, despite the implausibility of this in a typical fantasy/medieval world). Instead, we are given a believable account of a (determined and resourceful, but not super-human) woman's struggle to survive independently (i.e. without a man) in a very male-dominated and repressive culture. If this sounds like rather depressing reading, then you're not far wrong - this book is certainly less uplifting than any other in the series. However, it still contains the usual Hugh Cook elements in abundance - drama, excellent characterisation, invention and humour. Overall, it's not quite as good as some others in the series, particularly books 4, 9 and 10, but it's still a great read, and for a fan of the series, the future development of the careers of Morgan Hearst and Watashi is worth the purchase price by itself. Conclusion: well worth buying, especially if you're a fan of the series.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
The darkest book in an excellent series. Oct. 29 2000
By Cathal K. Ryan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is undoubtly the darkest and least "heroic" book in Hugh Cook's series: "Chronicles of an Age of Darkness", but it is a great read nonetheless. If you've ever wondered just how tough life would actually be for a women in a "realistic" medieval/fantasy world, look no further. The book never softens its grimly realistic tone by making artifical concessions to political correctness (which, in most modern fantasies, dictates that women should never be at a disadvantage to men, despite the implausibility of this in a typical fantasy/medieval world). Instead, we are given a believable account of a (determined and resourceful, but not super-human) woman's struggle to survive independently (i.e. without a man) in a very male-dominated and repressive culture. If this sounds like rather depressing reading, then you're not far wrong - this book is certainly less uplifting than any other in the series. However, it still contains the usual Hugh Cook elements in abundance - drama, excellent characterisation, invention and humour. Overall, it's not quite as good as some others in the series, particularly books 4, 9 and 10, but it's still a great read, and for a fan of the series, the future development of the careers of Morgan Hearst and Watashi is worth the purchase price by itself. Conclusion: well worth buying, especially if you're a fan of the series.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
uneasy triumph Nov. 2 2010
By Ms. Krieger - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Women and the Warlords is the true sequel to Wizards and the Warriors (book 1 in the series.) It is set primarily in the Collosnon Empire and shows a different view of the world of Argan, but the careers of Morgan Hearst and various other characters in book 1 are advanced, and the story makes sense in the world context.

The author takes a single main character, a female slave in the Collosnon Empire, and tells a complicated tale about her quest to live her life without male domination. Of course she ends up getting involved in world affairs, and altering history quite profoundly, but the book has a true narrative arc with a satisfying ending. The main character is good - she has grit and determination and a slight proclivity to violence, and she's likable. She also makes mistakes, sometimes serious, and you worry about her. A good protagonist for a good book.

I highly recommend it.
okay if you like the medievalist fantasy genre Aug. 15 2013
By Georgina Eliot - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I'm not a fan of fantasy, but saw this recommended somewhere for its wit and writing. Wasn't engaging enough for me to finish it, but it does have some wit and somewhat more developed characters than much of the, what to call it, 'medieval-tone' fantasy. This is set on another planet apparently, so it could be called sf.

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