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The Yellow Admiral Paperback – Jul 14 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: UK General Books (July 14 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007275617
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007275618
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 12.8 x 2.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 200 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #708,495 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Doug Briggs on July 15 1998
Format: Hardcover
The Yellow Admiral is as good as any of the previous 17 Aubrey/Maturin novels: as good as novels get. It has occurred to me, and not for the first time as I have read and reread the entire series and observed the whole cast of characters mature, that what we call the Aubrey/Maturin series is really one very long book with eighteen chapters.
One can read the Holmes/Watson books in any order; the characters never change, and I don't recall references by Doyle to previous events, such as those backwards glimpses O'Brian slyly slips to us steady fans from time to time that must sail right over the heads of hit-and-run readers.
With not a molecule of discredit to her genius intended, Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot remained the same character through 25 stories, and I'm not aware of any maturation of Miss Jane Marple. Of course, Agatha Christie probably felt that her readers preferred the familiarity that the sameness of characters provided.
What gives me the feat tha! ! t The Yellow Admiral might be the final Aubrey/Maturin episode? Diana never once jumps the traces; Jack mends all his fences at home; Sir Joseph Blaine is very much back in control in his seemingly obscure but influential position with "the Committee;" and Stephen has lived through a volume without a crisis. Then, just as Jack Aubrey has gotten used to the idea of building the Chileans a navy, while on a little respite in Funchal, Madeira, with his family and almost everyone else dear to him, he receives an urgent dispatch from Lord Keith of the Admiralty, advising him that Napoleon has escaped from Elba. Writes Keith: "You are to take all His Majesty's ships and vessels at present in Funchal under your command, hoisting your broad pennant in 'Pamone,' and . . .
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Polyarny on June 26 1998
Format: Paperback
If you have become an Aubrey/Maturin reader, and really like them, save this one for last. It's the last in the series and you need all the history of the previous 17 to appreciate it. It's not the best one, but it is the last. If you don't know what a Yellow Admiral is, for God's sake stop! When you know, and have read up to number 17, then take a break, find a good time to read, and jump into The Yellow Admiral. I wish there were 18 more.
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By grafmax on Nov. 28 2000
Format: Hardcover
I have enjoyed this series immensely, and I would recommend it to anyone interested in historical novels with excellent character development. O'Brien is a super writer.
Unfortunately, like Dr. Mautrin, I have developed my own addiction -- these novels. Therefore, I would like to know: Is this the end?
P/ e-mail if you have any insights or information. Thank you.
GRAFMAX
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By A Customer on Dec 5 1997
Format: Paperback
There is an awful lot of recycling going on in this book. The research is still prodigious, but I suspect at this point O'Brian has the topography and culture of early 19th Century Europe so much a part of him that he is now on automatic pilot. Well, he's entitled at this point. As usual, situations and characters are introduced, then never heard from or of again. Maturin's naivete is a more than a bit tiresome at this point. Nonetheless, I look forward to the next one and see how Jack deals with Napoleon.
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Format: Paperback
Aubrey & Maturin will always be worth reading, but
this series is definitely getting tired. After
the first three or four books, O'Brian started struggling
and this novel continues the long, long downhill path.

For alternatives, try the grandaddy of them all, the
Hornblower series by C.S. Forester, or the Bolitho stories
from Alexander Kent. Harder to find, try the Drinkwater
series from Richard Woodman (e.g., "An Eye of the Fleet")
or the Ramage series from Dudley Pope. On land, Bernard
Cornwell's Sharpe is pretty good too.
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Format: Paperback
Aubrey & Maturin will always be worth reading, but
this series is definitely getting tired. After
the first three or four books, O'Brian started struggling
and this novel continues the long, long downhill path.

For alternatives, try the grandaddy of them all, the
Hornblower series by C.S. Forester, or the Bolitho stories
from Alexander Kent. Harder to find, try the Drinkwater
series from Richard Woodman (e.g., "An Eye of the Fleet")
or the Ramage series from Dudley Pope. On land, Bernard
Cornwell's Sharpe is pretty good too.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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By A Customer on Aug. 2 1997
Format: Hardcover
O'Brian is never dull, of course, but this installment is too didactic for me. Where before Maturin's naivete is a natural cue for exploration of many topics, here it's just too obviously a chance for P O'B to display his astounding reasearch skills.

But the thread of Aubrey & Maturin's shared life remains compelling, and it surely has the best "cliffhanger" ending of the series so far. When does the next one come out?
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