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The Yellow Shark Original recording remastered


Price: CDN$ 142.62
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Jan. 14 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: Rykodisc
  • ASIN: B0000009VU
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #103,035 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Intro
2. Dog Breath Variations
3. Uncle Meat
4. Outrage at Valdez
5. Times Beach II
6. III Revised
7. Girl in the Magnesium Dress
8. Be-Bop Tango
9. Ruth Is Sleeping
10. None of the Above
11. Pentagon Afternoon
12. Questi Cazzi Di Piccione
13. Times Beach III
14. "Food Gathering in Post-Industrial America, 1992"
15. Welcome to the United States
16. Pound for a Brown
17. "Exercise, No. 4"
18. Get Whitey
19. G-Spot Tornado

Product Description

Amazon.ca

Released shortly after his death in 1993, The Yellow Shark represents one of the only accurate performances of Frank Zappa's "serious" orchestral music--at least as far as the composer was concerned. Assembled from a series of sold-out performances in Germany by the Ensemble Moderne, the set includes re-workings of old favorites like "The Dog Breath Variations" and "Uncle Meat," live arrangements of some of his hairiest computer music like "The Girl in the Magnesium Dress" and "G-Spot Tornado" and new works by Zappa composed specifically for the event. The performances are astonishing and the music? Pure Zappa. --Andrew Boscardin

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
This 72 minute long album features 18 Zappa compositions. Some pieces were written in the late sixties, but it's mostly material from its present. Everything old, though, is reworked and orchestrated for Ensemble Modern who do a GREAT job performing the music throughout the album. It's a very fresh, well performed and hi-tech sounding recording. It starts off with a nostalgic "Dog Breath/Uncle Meat" medley, continues with a beautiful ballad called "Outrage at Valdez".
The classic "Bebop Tango" is also performed but reworked featuring a new part written specifically for this recording.
"Ruth Is Sleeping" is an advance six minute piece written for, and performed on two pianos - truly inspiring as is "Get Whitey" (definitive highlight).
"Food Gathering..." and "Welcome To The U.S." are hilarious pieces of musical comedy - Cracks me up!
The album rounds off with Zappa conducting the ensemble playing "G-Spot Tornado"; a strong and perfect finish that was appreciated with a 15 minute standing ovation according to a FZ interview I read some time ago (on the recording the applause fade after two minutes).
The booklet is very informative - 30 pages featuring a lot of photos from the recoding and the rehearsals plus a LONG story about the whole project as well as commentary about EVERY PIECE from both Frank Zappa and the conductor Peter Rundel.
This recording is perfect proof that Frank Zappa was way more than a rock'n'roll guitar player, which unfortunately is the only way many saw him, and still do. He was and is an underrated composer and this is some of best work.
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By kireviewer on June 13 2003
Format: Audio CD
This was recorded on a European tour just before Zappa's death and relased just after. The picture on the cover looks like it was taken at Zappa's deathbed.
This CD was very popular on "classical-crossover" radio stations. It reached number 2 on the classic music charts. This CD received the only Grammy award Zappa ever won for music. Civilization Phaze III go the Grammy for packaging.
This is another of Zappa's orchestral albums, where we plays his most complicated compositions with a small orchestra. I have to admit that I don't always get it. He doesn't just play his rock tunes with an orchestra. He greatly rearranges them so that they are more discordant. Alot of it sounds like woodwind and horn players going off and doing there own thing.
This is one of the better Zappa Orchestra albums. There are some great piano duets. Most of the tracks near the end of the CD really rock (in an orchestral sort of way). But many of the earlier tunes are rather sad and boring, to match the CD cover.
There is also a 15 minute performace art interlude, where there is talk of a future society where everything is broken and a section where a German reads a US immigration form. None of this is something would want to hear more than once. And it breaks up the musical flow of the album.
Zappa is still one of the most important artists in rock history, and I did enjoy some of his earlier orchestral forays, with Lumpy Gravy and Uncle Meat.
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By kireviewer on Oct. 8 2001
Format: Audio CD
This was recorded on a European tour just before Zappa's death and relased just after. The picture on the cover looks like it was taken at Zappa's deathbed.
This is another of Zappa's orchestral albums, where we plays his most complicated compositions with a small orchestra. I have to admit that I don't always get it. He doesn't just play his rock tunes with an orchestra. He greatly rearranges them so that they are more discordant. Alot of it sounds like woodwind and horn players going off and doing there own thing.
This is one of the better Zappa Orchestra albums. There are some great piano duets. Most of the tracks near the end of the CD really rock (in an orchestral sort of way). But many of the earlier tunes are rather sad and boring, to match the CD cover. There is also a 15 minute performace art interlude, where there is talk of a future society where everything is broken and a section where a German reads a US immigration form. None of this is something would want to hear more than once.
Zappa is still one of the most important artists in rock history, and I did enjoy some of his earlier orchestral forays, with Lumpy Gravy and Uncle Meat.
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Format: Audio CD
Frank Zappa was not known for his serious nature. He was very good at pointing out the silliness and stupidity of just about anything that could be conceived. If there was one thing (besides family) that he took seriously, it was music, and he really did not take most of that too seriously, either. His rock compositions were big jokes as far as he was concerned. The only reason that it was as complex and involved as it was came from nothing less than the force of his genius. At the beginning of Yellow Shark, he off-handedly asks to audience to "get serious" (before asking them to put panties on one side of the stage), and one gets the impression that he is at least a little serious. Lord knows, if Frank is serious about it, maybe we should be, too.
Academia, if it as smart as it purports to be, will hopefully also take Zappa's chamber work seriously. Let's take a look at some of the major trends in the chamber / art music of the twentieth century and see why.
From 1900 to WWI, tonal harmony got deconstructed and eventually destroyed by Schoernberg and his students, Webern and Berg. Stravinsky and Bartok used this freedom to create new tonalities, like octotonicism and symmetrical harmony. Between the World Wars, many composers, like Copland and Villa-Lobos, turned towards the traditional music of their homeland for inspiration. After WWII, Cage and Brown worked under a philosophy that came to be called indeterminacy, in which the very idea of what music was came to be questioned. In the late 20th century, the climate of "classical" chamber music was a rediscovery of tonality and a turn towards minimalism.
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