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There Falls No Shadow

5 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Pennine Publishing Ltd (Nov. 20 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1905562012
  • ISBN-13: 978-1905562015
  • Product Dimensions: 17.2 x 10.8 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 240 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
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Product Description

About the Author

Son of a Scottish mother and Yorkshire father, David Eric Crossley was raised in Yorkshire. After a number of unsatisfying jobs, he joined the forces in 1970 and was a soldier for over 20 years. Qualified as an instructor in Nuclear Biological and Chemical Warfare, Combat Survival, Urban and Counter-revolutionary Warfare, Signals, Advanced First Aid, Light Rescue and Fire fighting, among other things, he served in Africa, Asia, the Gulf, Central and South America and Europe. He has lived through the reality and aftermath of wars and counter-terrorist operations, and as an advisor and rescuer during Aid to the Civil Powers missions after major disasters overseas. After leaving the forces, David settled in Scotland. He worked as Training Manager Scotland for the British Red Cross for 4 years including training overseas service and emergency response volunteers, and now works as an independent training consultant and writer. David has been writing professionally since the 1980s and has had over 80 magazine articles and short stories published in outdoors, survival, military, business and general interest magazines. He has also published the companion to this book – Bugging In, plus There Falls No Shadow - the first novel of a post-apocalyptic series, is working on the second, Slow the Shadow Creeps, and compiled, edited and wrote much of an urban survival reference, published as Streetcraft, for Ludlow Survivors Group. Check out David’s website at: http://www.tfns.co.uk/index2.html David welcomes feedback from readers of his work. Please email him at: books@decrossley.co.uk Twitter @TfnsbooksDavid Facebook David E. Crossley Books --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


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Format: Paperback
Compared with the "After The Fire" trilogy which I've just reviewed, this book is quite short, only half as long as single volume of AtF. It belongs to the distinctly less optimistic brand of "post-disaster" story, in the tradition of John Christopher rather than the "cosier" disasters of John Wyndham.

In Scotland, in the immediate aftermath of the Plague, most people are still "scavenging" off the leftovers from the Old Times. There has been only very limited work on rebuilding a self-sustaining society, and indeed serious questions are raised about its possibility. Will those who try be simply setting themselves up as natural victims for those who prefer robbery to hard work?

Incidentally, this raises a thought about the common complaint that the "Survivors" characters are rather too "middle class". Once the petrol and diesel's gone, might this be so far wrong? In a world where motor transport is either nonexistent or at best a luxury reserved for emergencies, the ability to ride a horse could be a big advantage, and these days upper and middle class folk are more likely to have acquired this skill. Maybe "toffs" like Garland or the Laird really would inherit the earth. But even if so, in this book it clearly hasn't had time to happen.

One of the few cheerful notes is where a man goes around local farms releasing all the animals he can find, both for humane reasons, feeling they "deserve a chance" and to preserve game or livestock for later human survivors. This was a thought that occasionally crossed my mind, but which I don't recall seeing in Survivors or any book etc on the theme.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x99bee180) out of 5 stars 3 reviews
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9958bae0) out of 5 stars "Survivors" Comes to Scotland - Great! Dec 11 2009
By M. W. Stone - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Compared with the "After The Fire" trilogy which I've just reviewed, this book is quite short, only half as long as single volume of AtF. It belongs to the distinctly less optimistic brand of "post-disaster" story, in the tradition of John Christopher rather than the "cosier" disasters of John Wyndham.

In Scotland, in the immediate aftermath of the Plague, most people are still "scavenging" off the leftovers from the Old Times. There has been only very limited work on rebuilding a self-sustaining society, and indeed serious questions are raised about its possibility. Will those who try be simply setting themselves up as natural victims for those who prefer robbery to hard work?

Incidentally, this raises a thought about the common complaint that the "Survivors" characters are rather too "middle class". Once the petrol and diesel's gone, might this be so far wrong? In a world where motor transport is either nonexistent or at best a luxury reserved for emergencies, the ability to ride a horse could be a big advantage, and these days upper and middle class folk are more likely to have acquired this skill. Maybe "toffs" like Garland or the Laird really would inherit the earth. But even if so, in this book it clearly hasn't had time to happen.

One of the few cheerful notes is where a man goes around local farms releasing all the animals he can find, both for humane reasons, feeling they "deserve a chance" and to preserve game or livestock for later human survivors. This was a thought that occasionally crossed my mind, but which I don't recall seeing in Survivors or any book etc on the theme.

Crossley gives some information, through several viewpoint characters (as in AtF) on the cause of the disaster, apparently a "war on terror" which escalated with a vengeance. There is a touch of Survivors in the book, where Emma echoes Abby's prayer that she is not the only one left alive. We also get the phenomenon of obsolete thinking carried on into the new environment, with the terrorist still fighting her old battles in a world where friend and foe alike are now all but extinct.

I was mildly amused and flattered that one of the communities is mentioned as being led by "a Mormon gentleman". Don't suppose he meant me, though.

In short, a good book, and for me a good read, if maybe not for those who like happy endings.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x98a44cf0) out of 5 stars Terry Nation the Next Generation Dec 9 2007
By Darren J. Clark - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I first read Terry Nations' Survivors in the early 80's and loved it. This book is similar, but goes into far more depth, probably because there are fewer characters and the author could explore them more. It's kind of frightening at how plausible this scenario actually is, all it would take is someone in a kitchen somewhere, doesn't have to a religious extremist, a sociopath will do, and you could wipe out a good portion of the worlds population.

I recomend this book to anyone who likes the aftermath survivor type stories, well written, good story lines and very believable. A good read and I'm awaiting the second book with much anticipation. Pity Terry Nation didn't do the same.
HASH(0x98a86ee8) out of 5 stars I enjoyed this book very much March 28 2015
By Gambler - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
I enjoyed this book very much. It was very interesting to read how the other side of the pond would deal with aSHTF situation. Hopefully, there will be a part 2 to the story.

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