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Thin ice: Money, politics and the demise of an NHL franchise [Paperback]

Jim Silver
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Book Description

1996 1895686717 978-1895686715 Not Stated
A shocking tale of political manipulation, greed, betrayal, and self-censorship at the hands of the business elite and the mainstream media, the story of the Winnipeg Jets is a bitter reminder that tradition means little in the economic climate of continentalist corporate sport.

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Review

"A well-researched account and timely antidote to the self-serving boosterism which conceals professional sport's reckless addiction to public subsidy." --Bruce Kidd, Dean of Physical Education, Univeristy of Toronto, and former olympic athelete

About the Author

Jim Silver is a professor of politics at the University of Winnipeg and past chair of the board of directors of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Manitoba. Has was also chair of the Winnipeg-based social action coalition Cho!ces.

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Most helpful customer reviews
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Balanced, yet biased ... Jan. 9 2007
Format:Paperback
It is very interesting to note how much of the American media is advocating that the Pittsburgh Penguins re-locate to Winnipeg, Manitoba. Sound reasoning involved here; after all, isn't Winnipeg a city where hockey is a religion? Yet from Winnipeg itself there appears to be no interest at all in bring the NHL back to the city. Thin Ice, even though it was written back in 1996, very accurately portrays the business community in Winnipeg as lacking in entrepreneurial spirit, both then and now. The grandchildren and great grandchildren who inherited all the "old money" from when Winnipeg was a boom-town are only concerned with preserving what they have, and have no ambition to use that money to create new business ventures. I agree with Jim Silver that professional sports teams should be run entirely by the private sector, and that tax payers should not contribute one red cent to what is in actual fact a luxury, especially when health care is in a crises. What is more important to taxpayers? Having millionaire athletes live in in the city, or ensuring that patients in over-crowded hospitals get the treatment they require NOW, not later? But I disagree with author Jim Silver when he advocates funding anti-poverty activists, who are themselves interested in perpetuating poverty so that they themselves can maintain well paid jobs as "social activists". When will the Left learn that the best way to eliminate poverty is to create opportunity for the poor to better themselves and become self sufficient? That said, and to conclude, Winnipeg will likely never have again have an NHL franchise, as long as the business community does not want to take the risk, and the Leftist Establishment in town is hostile to any attempt to create a worthwhile business venture. Read more ›
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars THIN ICE March 12 2006
By R. W. Crawford - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
A thorough and unbiased account of the struggles to compete and survive as a small market professional sports franchise. Book takes us through the history of pro hockey in Winnipeg, from its pre-NHL days, to the Winnipeg Jets, and finally to the Jets demise and relocation to Phoenix. The author's conclusions and predictions have proven to be slightly off base with the passage of time, but the book is still a fascinating read.
4.0 out of 5 stars Taken by Yankees Again!!! June 1 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book demonstrates a ken sense for the takeover of the Canadian Game (Hockey) by the US. Goes in depth on the background work on the Winnipeg Jets. Great Book! Trying to find more on a similar topic!
4.0 out of 5 stars Taken by Yankees Again!!! June 1 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book demonstrates a ken sense for the takeover of the Canadian Game (Hockey) by the US. Goes in depth on the background work on the Winnipeg Jets. Great Book! Trying to find more on a similar topic!
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Balanced, yet biased... June 26 2008
By GRH "Ex WHA Jet" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
It is very interesting to note how much of the American media is advocating that the Pittsburgh Penguins re-locate to Winnipeg, Manitoba. Sound reasoning involved here; after all, isn't Winnipeg a city where hockey is a religion? Yet from Winnipeg itself there appears to be no interest at all in bring the NHL back to the city. Thin Ice, even though it was written back in 1996, very accurately portrays the business community in Winnipeg as lacking in entrepreneurial spirit, both then and now. The grandchildren and great grandchildren who inherited all the "old money" from when Winnipeg was a boom-town are only concerned with preserving what they have, and have no ambition to use that money to create new business ventures. I agree with Jim Silver that professional sports teams should be run entirely by the private sector, and that tax payers should not contribute one red cent to what is in actual fact a luxury, especially when health care is in a crises. What is more important to taxpayers? Having millionaire athletes live in in the city, or ensuring that patients in over-crowded hospitals get the treatment they require NOW, not later? But I disagree with author Jim Silver when he advocates funding anti-poverty activists, who are themselves interested in perpetuating poverty so that they themselves can maintain well paid jobs as "social activists". When will the Left learn that the best way to eliminate poverty is to create opportunity for the poor to better themselves and become self sufficient? That said, and to conclude, Winnipeg will likely never have again have an NHL franchise, as long as the business community does not want to take the risk, and the Leftist Establishment in town is hostile to any attempt to create a worthwhile business venture. For this long time Winnipeg Jets fan, an unfortunate situation, as the opportunity would be there if only the business community would "wake up", and the government, both civic and provincial, where not so hung up on pouring money into the black hole of "social services".
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thin Ice- The business of Sports March 12 2006
By R. Wells - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The book was a great lesson on what happens when power and greed is the motivation behind building an arena and NHL Franchise. As a tax payer in a sports town, a must read.
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