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This Wired Home: The Microsoft Guide to Home Networking Paperback – Jan 1 2000


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Paperback, Jan 1 2000
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 475 pages
  • Publisher: Microsoft Press; 2 edition (Jan. 1 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0735611580
  • ISBN-13: 978-0735611580
  • Product Dimensions: 18.7 x 3.1 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 794 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,399,881 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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For a family whose members use computers every day, there are few easier ways to increase fun and productivity than with a small local area network (LAN). With a LAN in place, you can use any computer in the house to run your finance software and access your electronic mail. A LAN also makes it easy for the whole family to share an Internet connection, particularly a fast cable or xDSL one. This Wired Home: The Microsoft Guide to Home Networking is the gospel of home LANs according to Microsoft. It provides excellent instruction on designing, assembling, and configuring a home LAN that involves computers running Windows 98 or Windows NT 4. With its explicit statements of what to buy and what to do, you'll be happy with Alan Neibauer's work (unless you own a Macintosh).

Thankfully, Neibauer doesn't assume that a full-fledged LAN is the correct solution for everyone. He explains how to share a printer simply, using only a couple of extra cables and a switch box. But the real value in this book is in its clear explanations of installing network interface cards (NICs), setting up hubs, running cable, and configuring the software properly. Illustrations combine high-quality drawings (for hardware assembly sections) with screen shots (for sections on software setup). Even when explaining the complicated matters associated with sharing an Internet connection, Neibauer sticks to his clear, businesslike style. --David Wall

Topics covered: Advantages of a home network, alternatives to a full local area network (LAN), installing network interface cards (NICs), running cable, configuring Windows computers for LAN service, sharing an Internet connection, and performing specific tasks (printing, file sharing, and game playing) on the network. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


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Customer Reviews

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Format: Paperback
The Microsoft Guide is a comprehensive book that provides all the information you need to set up home networks based on the Windows 9x, ME and XP Operating Systems. I'm A+ / N+ Certified technician and also a PC Repair Instructor and with this book I was able to prepare a Networking fundamentals course with excellent response from the students. Half of my first class enrolled on the advanced course and are even talking about getting N+ certification. Thanks to this book I was able to create an enjoyable learning experience for the students.
By the way don't pay attention to the review that states lack of knowledge from the author. The reviewer is dumb enough to miss that Windows 98 and ME can't be servers because they are designed to be either workstations (clients) on a server/client enviroment, so they only access resources from the server, or work on a peer to peer enviroment so they can share resources with other PC and also access them from other PC. Also he is so ignorant to state that there's no such thing as Gigabit Ethernet. Maybe if he took the time to study the IEEE 802.3 cabling standard or even read any Network+ book he will crawl out of his ignorance.
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Format: Paperback
In "This Wired Home", Alan Neibauer provides a pragmatic view of home networking. His text covers topics from various types of hardware involved, to the configuration of sofware utilities and applications used for an assortment of network communication services.
If I had to knock the book, it would be for a lack of coverage on cable fabrication. If you're going to be fishing cable through walls, chances are you're not going to be using prefabricated cables with connectors already attached. I would have liked to have seen better coverage of tools and methods used for crimping RJ-45 connectors onto Cat 5 cabling, etc.
The material is well written, and is geared very much toward the novice network user. Experienced users will find this book to be a quick, easy read.
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Format: Paperback
Strangely enough, this book does not deal with Windows NT 4.0 workstation, but there is enough information you can extract to restore an NT nework which has stopped working for no obvious reasons. Save yourself a couple of hundred dollars on a network expert, fix it yourself, and get tiny but invaluable facts about setting up the TCP/IP and subnet mask fields for the next time. My surmise is that an upgrade in Service Pack disrupted the settings. A NIC card with self-diagnostics really helps too - it could have had more specific info on this area. The book also dwells too long on the advantages of a network over none - you would assume that if you would consider buying this book, that you already knew that.
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Format: Paperback
This is a good book to fine out just what a home network can do and how to do it.
I finally got my home network running with the help from this book and an article on-line. This book did lead me step by step on how to use Netmeeting so that I could work on the kid's computer while not leaving mine.
The author of this book spends a lot of time making things easy with all of the step-by-step instruction. So if you don't now or care about things like "cmd" or "ipconfig" you will really like this book.
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Format: Paperback
This book was once very good but because it was written in 1999 and published in 2000 I would look elsewhere for home networking info. Many changes have taken place since this book was published -- wireless networking standards have changed, cabling requirements have changed, and operating systems have improved. My recommendation is SOHO NETWORKING, an excellent book published in 2003.
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