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Through My Eyes Hardcover – Sep 1 1999


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Press (Sept. 1 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0590189239
  • ISBN-13: 978-0590189231
  • Product Dimensions: 27.5 x 23.9 x 1.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 363 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #166,934 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird on Dec 4 2003
Format: Hardcover
I'd not read such a well-written book about the racism of the 60s for children, until now. Prefaced by Harry Belafonte, the book is remarkable on a number of levels. Off the bat, it is written particularly well for small children. The style is clear and concise without being patronizing. Large full pictures of the people and events of the time are placed on each and every page. While these photographs are effective, they are not violent or frightening in a visceral way. The pictures of racists yelling at Ruby and other black children are images that stand on their own. At the bottom of most pages are quotes from some of the major players of the time. A quote from Ruby's mother explains that she was unaware that Ruby would be the only black child attending her school. Another notes that standardized tests given to black children were biased in favor of white middle-class children with the hopes of failing the black. The story has a clear linear feel to it and children reading it will recognize the characters. Ruby herself is a remarkable child, her photographs becoming the most powerful in the book. It is made clear to the reader that Ruby was just like any other child you might meet. This thought is expressed more fully in the back, where a Ruby B. jump-rope rhyme has been written. The repeated phrase "Ruby B., Ruby B., You were a little girl just like me", drills the thought home. All in all, the book is wonderful. I recommend it to any parent, teacher, or librarian struggling to explain the civil rights movement to their kids.
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By A Customer on Feb. 13 2004
Format: Hardcover
Freedom
Though my eyes
By Ruby Bridges

This book is about a true story of a pivotal event in history as Ruby Bridges saw it unfold around her. It is also about a black six year old girl.
An exciting/interesting part is when Ruby Bridges talks at the end of the book and says "I know that experience comes to us for a purpose, and if we follow the guidance of the sprit with us, we will proubly find that the purpose is a good one."
If you like reading about nonfiction books then this is the book for you.
When I read this book I always give it a thumbs up!
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Format: Hardcover
How does it feel to be the first to lead the way to new beginnings in history?
6-year-old Ruby Bridges was the first black child to enroll in a white elementary school in New Orleans, Louisiana. On November 14, 1960 Ruby walked into the school with her mother and four U.S. Marshals. The other families pulled their white children out of the school. So Ruby was left alone with her teacher, Mrs. Henry, inside their big classroom. This was the beginning of school integration.
How must this little first grader feel with so many adults yelling horrible things at her? One woman even threatened to poison her. People held a small coffin with a black doll inside to scare her. People threatened her neighborhood � and her father lost his job. This is brave little Ruby�s astounding story.
(p. 20) When we left school that first day, the crowd outside was even bigger and louder than it had been in the morning. I guess the police couldn�t keep them behind the barricades. It seemed to take us a long time to get to the marshals� car.
Groups of high school boys, joining the protestors, paraded up and down the street and sang new verses to old hymns. Their favorite was �Battle Hymn of the Republic,� in which they changed the chorus to �Glory, glory, segregation, the South will rise again.� Many of the boys carried signs and said awful things, but most of all I remember seeing a black doll in a coffin, which frightened me more than anything else.
After the first day, I was glad to get home. That afternoon, I taught a friend the chant I had learned: �Two, four, six, eight, we don�t want to integrate.� My friend and I didn�t know what the words meant, but we would jump rope to it every day after school.
Would the chaos ever end? Would the other children return to school?
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By Megan Allyn on April 3 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book was great; it was about Ruby Briggs experience being one of the first colored children to integrate the elementary schools in the south. It gives a wonderful perspective about how this young girl viewed racism. It also shows the reader that she did not completely understand why some many people were mean to her. It is an extreme eye opener to how strong racism was in the south, at one point it talks about grown women throwing and yelling at Ruby.
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By Megan Allyn on April 3 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book was great; it was about Ruby Briggs experience being one of the first colored children to integrate the elementary schools in the south. It gives a wonderful perspective about how this young girl viewed racism. It also shows the reader that she did not completely understand why some many people were mean to her. It is an extreme eye opener to how strong racism was in the south, at one point it talks about grown women throwing and yelling at Ruby.
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Format: Hardcover
I began reading this book out loud to my 10-year-old because I recognized it as a book that he would not pick up on his own. It was the perfect thing to do because there were all sorts of terms like "segregation" and "racism" that he needed me to explain. But more importantly, he had all sorts of comments and questions about the ignorance and hatred depicted in this true that were worthy of discussion . . . some of which were predictable, some were not. He ended up finishing the book on his own because it is such an engaging story.
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