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Timelike Infinity Hardcover – Dec 7 1992


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Canada / Trade; First Edition edition (Dec 7 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0002240165
  • ISBN-13: 978-0002240161
  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 14.8 x 3.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 481 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,019,117 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From the Publisher

A NOVEL IN THE XEELEE SEQUENCE

'A major new talent' - Arthur C. Clark

'Baxter sends into freefall the most awesome ideas in science fiction today' - The Times --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Stephen Baxter applied to become an astronaut in 1991. He didn't make it, but achieved the next best thing by becoming a science fiction writer, and his novels and short stories have been published and won awards around the world. His science background is in maths and engineering. He is married and lives in Buckinghamshire.

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

By malcolm edge on June 9 2002
Format: Paperback
I found Stephen Baxter quite by accident in an airport bookstore. I picked up 'Titan' and thoroughly enjoyed it. So I decided to get all his books and start reading them from the beginning. I was fascinated by the Xeelee Sequence thread through his early works. Raft was very interesting and Baxter's immense imagination caught me by surprise.
I've just finished 'Timelike Infinity' and could not put the book down. It is hard SF with some deep descriptions of black holes, event horizons et al but it is a superb read. While this is hard SF, I think Michael Poole's character was well developed without giving away some secrets about how he knows all the astro-physics stuff (that comes later I hope).
All in all, a terrific read for SF'ers who want a good story, a quick read, threads to future books, and an imagination that is difficult to find nowadays.
Oh, by the way, I've read accounts of other Baxter books and there are references to the fact that the Xeelee Sequence books are standalone books. Perhaps, but my advice is to start at the beginning and work your way through the 5 books beginning with Raft. While the stories are definitely set in different era's, there are plenty of references made in each of the books I've read so far that the chronology is necessary
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Format: Paperback
This novel is a step up from Baxter's well done first novel, Raft. In this case, his writing is much more tight and clear.

As for plot, this one is fascinating. I don't think that the topic of time-travel will ever lose its interest for me; in this case, Baxter was able to maintain my interest consistently throughout the book. Moreover, he adds other oft-used, but always interesting topics such as alien opressive rule and interplanetary communication. I have learned that there are more books about the Xeelee and now I want to find out more about these mysterious creatures who have such advanced technology. Baxter is indeed a master of "hard" sci-fi.

On the negative side, I was disappointed with the ending that in some ways was predictable and awkward. Nonetheless, he kept the theme provocative and thoughtful
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Format: Paperback
While it moves somewhat slow, "Timelike Infinity" is still very good. This book is about Michael Poole, a brilliant scientist who wants to build gates to link up the galaxy. Using this gates, it is possible to travel from Earth to Pluto nearly instantaneusly. Once he pulls this of, Poole decides to try to make a gate to connect to the future.
This works all to well, because Poole connects to an Earth that is occupied by an alien species called the Qax. The humans in this time are desparate to end the occupation and journey back in time to stop it from happening. Poole then finds himself fighting to preserve history.
"Timelike Infinity" is a wonderful book about the consequences of innovation and a very good read.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
Slow Pace and Flat Characters; Try the Sequel Instead Aug. 2 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This novel describes a future operation to open wormholes through time. The operation is successful, but aliens from the future travel through the wormholes to invade Earth. One of the author's earlier works, Timelike Infinity has both Stephen Baxter's usual flair for the original and the inspired, and his talent for writing extremely hard science fiction. However, I would hesitate to recommend this novel for either the casual or the discerning reader. In this early book the characters are flat and unsymphathetic, the plot wanders seemingly without reason, and the science, marvelous as it may be, is allowed to interfere with the telling of the story. The theme is not evident until the end, and the point of the story is left unclear for the first two hundred pages. By then the suspense has long since declined to mere tedium, and the reader has lost all interest in both the underdeveloped characters and their predicament. Readers interested in Stephen Baxter or in hard SF should read Ring, his sequel to Timelike Infinity. Ring provides ample synopsis, and is a definite stand-alone novel. The characters in Ring are more vivid than they are in Timelike Infinity, and the plot moves at a fast and logical clip, culminating in an explosion of ideology and hypothesis certain to expand the horizons of any reader
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
This is a very good book Sept. 14 2003
By C. J. Schaps - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
While it moves somewhat slow, "Timelike Infinity" is still very good. This book is about Michael Poole, a brilliant scientist who wants to build gates to link up the galaxy. Using this gates, it is possible to travel from Earth to Pluto nearly instantaneusly. Once he pulls this of, Poole decides to try to make a gate to connect to the future.
This works all to well, because Poole connects to an Earth that is occupied by an alien species called the Qax. The humans in this time are desparate to end the occupation and journey back in time to stop it from happening. Poole then finds himself fighting to preserve history.
"Timelike Infinity" is a wonderful book about the consequences of innovation and a very good read.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A terrific read June 9 2002
By malcolm edge - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I found Stephen Baxter quite by accident in an airport bookstore. I picked up 'Titan' and thoroughly enjoyed it. So I decided to get all his books and start reading them from the beginning. I was fascinated by the Xeelee Sequence thread through his early works. Raft was very interesting and Baxter's immense imagination caught me by surprise.
I've just finished 'Timelike Infinity' and could not put the book down. It is hard SF with some deep descriptions of black holes, event horizons et al but it is a superb read. While this is hard SF, I think Michael Poole's character was well developed without giving away some secrets about how he knows all the astro-physics stuff (that comes later I hope).
All in all, a terrific read for SF'ers who want a good story, a quick read, threads to future books, and an imagination that is difficult to find nowadays.
Oh, by the way, I've read accounts of other Baxter books and there are references to the fact that the Xeelee Sequence books are standalone books. Perhaps, but my advice is to start at the beginning and work your way through the 5 books beginning with Raft. While the stories are definitely set in different era's, there are plenty of references made in each of the books I've read so far that the chronology is necessary
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
An excellent second novel for Baxter Aug. 10 2002
By Robert Knetsch - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This novel is a step up from Baxter's well done first novel, Raft. In this case, his writing is much more tight and clear.

As for plot, this one is fascinating. I don't think that the topic of time-travel will ever lose its interest for me; in this case, Baxter was able to maintain my interest consistently throughout the book. Moreover, he adds other oft-used, but always interesting topics such as alien opressive rule and interplanetary communication. I have learned that there are more books about the Xeelee and now I want to find out more about these mysterious creatures who have such advanced technology. Baxter is indeed a master of "hard" sci-fi.

On the negative side, I was disappointed with the ending that in some ways was predictable and awkward. Nonetheless, he kept the theme provocative and thoughtful
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Hard Science Fiction July 7 2012
By A. Wong - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Not being a great writer myself I will let others do the plot summaries and simply state my opinion of the book.

I consider Baxter one of the core group of hard science fiction writers however reading his books often feels too much like work...unlike Banks or Reynolds. Maybe its too much exposition on physics and too little character development. The balance between the two is off.

All in all, a so so book.


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