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Clash of the Titans (Blu-ray Book) (Sous-titres français) [Import]


Price: CDN$ 22.49 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Clash of the Titans (Blu-ray Book) (Sous-titres français) [Import] + Jason and the Argonauts [Blu-ray]
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Product Details

  • Actors: Laurence Olivier, Harry Hamlin, Claire Bloom, Maggie Smith, Ursula Andress
  • Directors: Desmond Davis
  • Writers: Beverley Cross
  • Producers: Charles H. Schneer, John Palmer, Ray Harryhausen
  • Format: Color, DTS Surround Sound, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English, French, Spanish
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: PG
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • Release Date: March 2 2010
  • Run Time: 118 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (102 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000Q7ZOL2

Product Description

Product Description

Before history and beyond imagination! The machinations of gods above and the fates of man and monsters here below play out in a Clash of the Titans. Decades prior to the sensational 2010 version of the tale, Harry Hamlin took up sword and shield to play valorous Perseus, mortal son of Zeus (Laurence Olivier) who sets out to fulfill his destiny by rescuing beloved Andromeda from the wrath of goddess Thetis (Maggie Smith). Perils await Perseus time and again. And eye-filling thrills await viewers as stop-motion effects legend Ray Harryhausen (Jason and the Argonauts) unleashes snake-haired Medusa, fearsome Kraken, winged Pegasus, two-headed dog Dioskilos, giant scorpions and more. Rejoice, fantasy fans: the movie gods gift us with adventure that's innovative, heroic, titanic.

Amazon.ca

You have a classic tale full of drama, passion, and adventure. A tale of universal archetypes that speak to everyone. A tale that has remained unfailingly popular for thousands of years. Why not spice it up with a wacky mechanical owl? Such was the thinking behind Clash of the Titans. Maggie Smith, Laurence Olivier, and Harry Hamlin (one of these things is not like the others...) star in a toga-ripper about a valiant hero, capricious immortals, and lots and lots of giant stop-action monsters. Perseus (Hamlin) is the favored son of the god Zeus (Olivier), but he has unwittingly ticked off the sea goddess Thetis (Smith). Just to make things worse, Perseus falls in love with the lovely Princess Andromeda, who used to be engaged to Thetis's son. Soon Perseus is off on one quest after another, with Zeus helping, Thetis hindering, and lots of innocent bystanders getting stabbed, drowned, and squished. Of course, the whole thing is just an excuse to show as much of Ray Harryhausen's stop-motion animation as possible, and good thing too. It's an old technique, but it still looks pretty darn cool, and it means the cast can just relax and do a bunch of reaction shots. Don't use this one to study for that big classical mythology exam, but if you just turn your brain off and enjoy the Kraken, it's pretty good fun. --Ali Davis --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By gobirds2 on July 14 2002
Format: VHS Tape
When CLASH OF THE TITANS was first released theatrically it was an across-the-board success. It just wasn't popular with followers of the genre but with the general public. It contained elements of the fantastic, Greek Mythology and most importantly it contained a story of young love told with genuine prose and passion. This is Ray Harryhausen's last full-length feature to date. It does not contain the awe-inspiring creatures or the sweep of JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS. It does not contain the eerie landscapes and esoteric feeling of isolation of MYSTERIOUS ISLAND. What CLASH OF THE TITANS has is the romanticism of its catalytic love story and also the romanticism for an era of filmmaking coming to an end. Harry Hamlin's performance, as Perseus is one of nobility and character, not cynicism. Laurence Olivier as Zeus shows us a god with a conscience manipulating events for the manifestation of mortal man's better qualities. Harryhausen's Pegasus shows us that man has the ability to control the creatures of the fantastic, tame them and use them for what is good in the universe. Laurence Rosenthal's heavenly score floats like an ethereal mist with its gossamer tonalities in somewhat a homage to Ray Harryhausen, the late composer Bernard Herrmann but ultimately to the romantic images and the eternal story of man's devotion to love found in CLASH OF THE TITANS.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John Gentile on Dec 30 2003
Format: DVD
Even before this movie was released in 1981, critics bashed it saying "stop motion is out". Stop motion is the technique by which a small model is moved a fraction of an inch, one frame at a time, photographed, and when the frames are run together, it appears as if the object is moving. Computers were helping animators move models and "Go motion" was born (it was used in 1982's Dragonslayer- resulting in very smooth animation).
Of course, the movie going public LOVED this film, making it a big hit, leading to a 1982 rerelease. I saw this movie in a theater at a 10pm show filled with adults, and the audience cheered, laughed and applauded during the credits. To this day, this remains a popular film.
Yet it also remains one people like to poke fun at. Arnold's LAST ACTION HERO has a scene where a teacher shows her class HAMLET, sarcasticly noting that Lawrence Olivier was in this movie before his "epic" CLASH OF THE TITANS. Joke if you must, but the animation scenes in this film rival any in stop motion history. Ray Bradbury picks the Medusa scene as Harryhausen's best.
Based on Greek mythology, the script is actually a love story: a hero tries to save his true love from adversity (in this case titanic monsters). The animation is integrated well into the story, and not just a showplace for Harryhausen's talent.
The film still holds up today, even the effects. When computer animation is done on the cheap, as in many of today's lower budgeted films, it looks cartoony. Stop motion employs a solid object, and is truly amazing if done right.
Small children might find some of the monsters frightening, but all other fantasy fans will have a great time.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Dec 28 2003
Format: DVD
It was 1981 when "Clash Of The Titans" premiered. Its claymation and special effects were the making of veteran "cinema-illusion" engineer Ray Harryhausen (Jason And The Argonauts, Earth Versus The Flying Saucer, and several 50's monster invasion films). It starred Harry Hamlin (from the 80's series L.A. law), Judi Boker, Laurence Olivier, Maggie Smith, Sian Phillips, Burgess Meredith, Claire Bloom, Ursula Andress and Flora Robson. The subject of Greek myth had been projected into the film decades before - the Steve Reeves Hercules films and the forementioned Jason and the Argonauts come to mind. A generation of people grew up watching these myth-based fantasy films. On DVD, we have commentary by special effects master Ray Harryhausen recalling his long career and claiming that such directors as Steven Spieldberg, James Cameron and George Lucas were greatly influenced and inspired by these types of films.
Harry Hamlin stars as Perseus, the son of Zeus by the married queen Danae. Zeus, furious that Danae and his son were punished by being cast into the sea in a coffin on order of the king of Argos, unleashes the Kraken to destroy the city. This scene is very impressive, particularily the flooding of the city and the fall of a large statue of the king. Laurence Olivier's Zeus is the best on record. He was quite older by this time but delivers a truly imperious, tyrannical and vainglorious king of the gods. Opposing him is Maggie Smith's Thetis, goddess of the sea who resented that her own son, Calabos, was cursed by being made into a gargoyle-like demon. Soon enough, Zeus sends Perseus on a quest to save Andromeda.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Dubei on June 4 2002
Format: DVD
A rarity in filmwork: a fantasy that is a great story. I've been kinda bummed with many fantasy films (thankfully Lord of the Rings came out and was excellent) because so many of them have turned out to be rather mediocre. Clash of the Titans is not one of them though. it is a great film that mixes in the mythology with special effects rather well. obviously the effects are quite outdated in our modern CG world, but the story is still quite strong.
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