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To Have and Have Not Paperback – Mar 20 1996


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner; Reprint edition (March 20 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684818981
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684818986
  • Product Dimensions: 20.6 x 13.4 x 1.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 240 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #24,867 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Emily on April 12 2004
Format: Paperback
This book reminded me of a horrid ride that you couldn't get off. At first it was fun, then gradually, you just want to puke. It's the story of a weak protagonist who spends the book carrying out a pathetic vendetta against authority in general. I was extremely disappointed with this novel since I usually love Hemingway's work. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone, unless you want to read about the same recurring incident over and over.
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By Rhea Darch on Jan. 3 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book brought me to tears. I'm not sure what else to say. There is something about how this man writes that moves me.
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By A Customer on Feb. 4 2004
Format: Paperback
I was inspired to read my first Hemingway novel by my upcoming trip to Key West, FL. Since the Hemingway House is on the "must-see" list for Key West tourists, I thought I should familiarize myself with the work of this renowned author. "To Have and Have Not" particularly caught my eye when I saw that it is the story of Harry Morgan, a man who is forced by economic circumstances and family obligations into smuggling contraband between Key West and Cuba. I wasn't disappointed!
This is an amazing story about a many who does what is necessary for the well-being of his family. SURVIVAL is a main theme throughout this novel - Harry Morgan does what is necessary for his family's survival; Marie Morgan also learns to survive when she loses her lover and provider. There is also a vivid contrast made between the "Haves" and "Have Nots" when Hemingway discusses how the wealthy yachtsmen are unable to overcome their petty financial troubles while the struggling and often impoverished Conchs of Key West seem to endure against all odds.
Reading this story has whet my appetite for more Hemingway and I am looking forward to spending time with some of his six-toed cats in Key West :-)!
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Format: Hardcover
Rough. Hard. Dirty. Physical. Tough. And also lyrical, simple, emotional, indelible. All characteristics of Hemingway's writing, all present in this book. A simple story of Harry Morgan, sometime fisherman forced into smuggling and illegal immigration just to feed his family, a man who spirals down the slippery road of 'the end justifying the means' till there is nothing left but survive at any cost.
The story is told as three separate time-segments in Harry's life, which forces a certain disjointedness to the tale. But it also allows Hemingway to illuminate Harry's story with different segments of the Cuban and Key West societies at different times with changing social conditions. There are many character vignettes, people captured sometimes in only a few paragraphs, people who are desperate, silly, egotistical, idealistic, cynical, worn-out, greedy, dissolute, resigned, driven, and just coping. Albert, a man doing relief work for less than subsistence wages, is one of the clearest and most poignant images, hiring on as mate to Henry even though he knows the voyage is supremely dangerous. Within this short portrait of this man, we see not only the extremes that desperation will drive a man to, but also Hemingway's commentary on social/political organizations and economic structures that give rise to such desperation. This was quite typical of Hemingway, as he never beat his reader's over the head with his political philosophy, but showed the underpinnings of his reasoning through the circumstances of his characters.
Throughout this work, there is the sense that there is more here than what the words on the page delineate, a theme of people from all walks of life and all economic circumstances who are caught in the implacability of fate.
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By Richard A. Mitchell on Sept. 24 2003
Format: Hardcover
Let me preface this by saying that I am not a big Hemingway fan.
I remember a college professor saying that Fitzgerald would agonize over every word of his novels. He would be terribly angered that Hemingway would grab a bottle of whiskey, walk up to his writer's garrett and whip out a novel.
My impression after reading this Heminngway work is that he did just that - grabbed a bottle of whiskey and whipped out a novel. The parts of the books are headed as seasons in Harry Morgan's life and much of the book that is devoted to him is okay. He is Florida Keys boat owner trying to get by with money-making trips - both legal and illegal - between Florida and Cuba. However, especially near the end, there are other characters brought in who have absolutely no relation to the book. The impression the reader gets is that these characters and their descriptioons were sitting on Hemingway's desk and he threw them in as filler. Most annoying were a series of character descriptions of people on yachts in a yacht club when the Coast Guard was towing in a boat - completely useless to the book. A freshman in college may cite them as some examples of class disparity, but I think that is giving too much credit.
Unless you are completely enamored by Hemingway, I'd skip this one. Frankly, if it weren't by Hemingway I doubt it would have ever been reprinted - if printed at all.
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Format: Paperback
I found To Have and Have Not to be the roughest of the Hemingway's works that I have read to date. The narrative is choppy, and the reader never really gets into the protoganist's head the way we do in even his earliest works ("The Sun Also Rises"). The progress of the plot is uneven, and unlike his many works set in Europe, we do not develop a vivid image of either Havana or the Florida keys.
If you are looking for an introduction to Hemingway, I strongly recommend reading one of his great works such as A Farewell to Arms or For Whom the Bell Tolls. If you are working your way through all of Hemingway's works, then of course this belongs on your list.
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