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We Too Are One (deluxe re-issue) [Original recording remastered]

Eurythmics Audio CD
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 13.72 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Product Details


1. We Two Are One
2. The King And Queen Of America
3. (My My) Baby's Gonna Cry
4. Don't Ask Me Why
5. Angel
6. Revival
7. You Hurt Me (And I Hate You)
8. Sylvia
9. How Long?
10. When The Day Goes Down
11. Precious
12. See No Evil
13. The King And Queen Of America
14. Angel
15. Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me

Product Description

Product Description

Limited edition remastered reissue of 1989 album is packaged in a digipak & includes five bonus tracks, 'Precious', 'See No Evil', 'King & Queen Of America' (Dance Remix), 'Angel' (Choir Version), & 'Last Night I Dreamt'. BMG. 2005.

Product Description

EURYTHMICS We Too Are One (2005 issue UK Limited Deluxe Edition 15-track digitally remastered CD album [painstakingly collated from original master tapes and with the supervision of Dave Stewart] and featuring 5 bonus tracks which include TheKing& Queen Of America [Dance Remix] and Angel [Choir Version]. Housed in a fold-out digipak picture sleeve complete with picture booklet containing extensive sleeve notes & previously unseen photographs)

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Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Farewell to the 80s July 29 2006
By Pieter Uys HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
After dominating the decade with their sublime music, Eurythmics bowed out in 1989 with this accomplished pop album, full of their usual strong hooks and poetic lyrics.

The farewell feeling is very tangible throughout the album, especially so on the rousing but sad King and Queen of America ("... the king of nothing/and the queen of pain ...") and the atmospheric When The Day Goes Down with its beautiful lyric about compassion for the weak.

Don't Ask Me Why and Angel made the charts in the UK and are the more immediately accessible tracks here. Not quite as brilliant as Savage, Be Yourself Tonight or Revenge, this is nevertheless still a strong album which all Eurythmics fans will appreciate.

The album has now been substantially enhanced with bonus tracks and deluxe packaging that includes a booklet with previously unreleased photographs and historical notes.

Of the additional tracks, my favorites are their interpretation of The Smiths' Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me, the dance remix of The King And Queen Of America and the soulful Angel (Choir Version). This enhanced album is absolutely essential for Eurythmics fans.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Eurythmics' black sheep. Jan. 4 2006
By Louis TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
This album, which marked the end of the first era of Eurythmics's career, has always been some kind of a black sheep. It has been unfairly criticized for its glossy pop appeal, and many Eurythmics fans have been quick to misjudge the album as an attempt to rebound commercially from the dark experiments of its predecessor, the masterful "Savage". Listening to it today on this wonderful remastered edition, 16 years after its initial release, its many qualities are even more obvious than they were, and its flaws seem even less important than they used to.
"We Too Are One" is indeed a slick pop affair, that may lack the experimentalism of the band's earlier work, or the playful approach used on their mid-80s albums like "Revenge" or "Be Yourself Tonight". It's a very straight-forward album, and one might even be tempted to say that anyone could have done it - that is, until you realize that extreme emotional states co-exist on this album, and that this kind of duality has always been at the very core of Eurythmics. Album tracks like the bitter "Baby's Gonna Cry", "Don't Ask Me Why" or the spiteful "You Hurt Me (And I Hate You)" are cleverly juxtaposed with hopeful and serene songs such as "When the day goes down", "Revival" and the title track. And the biting "King & Queen of America" just might be one of the most overlooked Eurythmics single ever (not to mention their funniest video ever).
All is not perfect on this album; the remastered sound is wonderful and breeds new life on these songs, but the somewhat generic production leaves the listener with the impression that the band was not at its creative peak.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Last 80's Eurythmics album April 6 2004
Format:Audio CD
This album was my favourite record of the 1989-90 season. We were fortunate enough to have Eurythmics tour Australia in December, and they played several songs from this album at the concert I attended here in Hobart, including the wonderful ballad Angel and the elegant, stylish pop of Don't Ask Me Why. Other choice cuts include the valedictory When The Day Goes Down , which for 10 years stood as a fitting coda to the group's terrific run of 80's songs, and the jaunty, lighthearted single Revival. This record has a professional pop sheen to it that marks it as being from the late phase of the band's career, and the quirky, ear-catching sounds of the Eurythmics' innovative early 80's records are missing, yet it's still a good album.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars  20 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Better than the poor reviews it got April 5 2007
By William - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
By 1989, the appeal of the Eurythmics was slowly easing off. Perhaps people were tired of them. In Australia, the first single lifted from this album was "revival" which was perhaps a poor choice as it did nothing on the charts. Radio started to pick up album tracks such as "King and Queen of America" which was extremely catchy tune. This was not the next single in Australia despite airplay. The second single was "Don't ask me why" which is a more mature sounding Eurythmics and remains one of my all time favourites to this day. That was the last single lifted in Australia after the album failed to make much impact. Despite that, the album is chock full of fanatastic songs, including the American single "Angel" and the great title track.

While I love "Be Yourself Tonight" and "Savage", I am more likely to put this album on when I need a dose of the Eurythmics possibly because of the more mature sound, and some very well crafted tunes.

Don't let this album slip by your Eurythmics collection,
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Farewell to the 80s Jan. 8 2006
By Pieter Uys - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
After dominating the decade with their sublime music, Eurythmics bowed out in 1989 with this accomplished pop album, full of their usual strong hooks and poetic lyrics.

The farewell feeling is very tangible throughout the album, especially so on the rousing but sad King and Queen of America ("... the king of nothing/and the queen of pain ...") and the atmospheric When The Day Goes Down with its beautiful lyric about compassion for the weak.

Don't Ask Me Why and Angel made the charts in the UK and are the more immediately accessible tracks here. Not quite as brilliant as Savage, Be Yourself Tonight or Revenge, this is nevertheless still a strong album which all Eurythmics fans will appreciate.

The album has now been substantially enhanced with bonus tracks and deluxe packaging that includes a booklet with previously unreleased photographs and historical notes.

Of the additional tracks, my favorites are their interpretation of The Smiths' Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me, the dance remix of The King And Queen Of America and the soulful Angel (Choir Version). This enhanced album is absolutely essential for Eurythmics fans.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A nice goodbye Sept. 25 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
It wasn't the saddest occasion to see Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart end their ties as Eurythmics because those of us who were (and are) Eurythmics fans knew that good things would come from them individually. Yet it feels like a goodbye present for us to have We Too Are One to cap off a 10-year career that sent the biggest of the fans into different universes all at the same time.
This album has been panned for being too sedate compared to more ambitious past efforts. But, if Eurythmics wanted to create another Savage or 1984-type album, they would've. Here we see how Stewart and Lennox were able to keep the emotional level high even with such a refined sound.
The first single from the album, "Don't Ask My Why," is understated, to say the least. But what makes it a great number is the orchestral setting backing Lennox's held back performance. We couldn't have Annie pulling an "I Need a Man" with so much haute-couture surrounding her. "The King and Queen of America," likewise, holds tight and contains a reserved, almost sad, vocal performance. "Sylvia," a chamber-orchestra-style ballad, is obviously inspired by the Beatles. "Revival" is fun and the only personality protruding track on the album. "You Hurt Me (And I Hate You)" is less intense than its title. And "Angel," the track that makes this album worth having, shows us how beautifully Dave and Annie work together.
Of course, to end the album, they had to give us "When the Day Goes Down," a carthartic look at the hope of the down-trodden, "the burnt out and the useless and the lonely and the weak, and the lost and the degraded and the too dumb to speak." Although it's not standard Eurythmics fare, it's a nice way to give us one for the road.
This album is primarily a must for the Eurythmics fan and is not definitive of what made Eurythmics the practitioners of musical creativity in the more-sensible-than-aesthetic '80s. But it never hurts to expand your musical horizons.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Big improvement from "Savage" June 3 2002
By Thomas K. Dye - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I totally thought I was going to hate an album with a song called "You Hurt Me And I Hate You" (does this sound like a three-year-old's whiny tantrum or what?) but in fact it's one of my favorite songs on the album. It starts off with a grandiose, soulful cry for help, then goes into a big funky verse and chorus, before leading into that MAGNIFICENT middle-eight where Annie deepens her voice with dark menace and purpose. It's really satisfying; this is one time you can tell Annie isn't going to take the heartache of life lying down.
That's probably why in the end this has become one of my favorites; Annie sings more about dealing with pain and moving on ("When the Day Goes Down","Revival","The King and Queen of America") than just wallowing in it. Couple that with a bigger production than usual and you have a really fun album to listen to. And I love to hear David play his funky guitar to boot!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Much Different From Earlier Work Jan. 17 2001
By Jaime Miles - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Here was the Eurythmic's last album of the 80's, although much different from their earlier work, Annie & Dave dish out a few songs that may seem reminscent to earlier work. "We Two Are One" vividly returns to the "Revenge" album fusing soul and rock together, while "Sylvia" returns to the Sweet Dreams era with all the right synthesizer keys with Annie's voice gliding smoothly over it. The album ends with a beautiful song "When The Day Goes Down" most likely the most beautiful song they ever wrote together. While this album doesn't churn out many hits, it's worth having just because this is one of the most memorable groups of the 80's. Enjoy!
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