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Tower of Babble, The: Sins, Secrets and Successes Inside the CBC Hardcover – Apr 5 2012


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre; Canadian First edition (April 5 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1926812735
  • ISBN-13: 978-1926812731
  • Product Dimensions: 3 x 15.3 x 22.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 544 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #120,004 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Stewart Kiff on April 27 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The tower of Babble by Richard Stursburg is a exciting and interesting read about Stursburg's six years as president of English language services at the CBC.

I really liked this book for a number of reasons.

As a CBC consumer I found a lot of his stories touched me through my personal experience watching the CBC

Stursberg writes well and clearly. He doesn't suffer fools gladly. And that makes for an exciting read.

And the CBC continues to occupy a key place in Canadian culture and his role is worth reading about.

His account stretches across many areas of interest. For examples begins with is enough inauspicious start in 2005 which leads quickly into the CBC strike and cutbacks. He is particularly good at discribing the bysantine world of internal CBC politics and the protectorates that had grown up at the CBC.

For those students of media bias in particular is worth reading to sections: first his part about the extremely unfair coverage reporters gave him during the CBC strike, and secondly his efforts to convince the Harper conservative government that English CBC was no more biased than the other two main networks. )This did not go well)

Hockey fans will be fascinated to read about the bidding war the rights to hockey night Canada and how CBC was outbid by CTV for the Olympic games rights.

Perhaps the most striking part of this book for me was how much I continue to consume of the CBC in my household-for example the CBC show "Heartland" is a big hit in my household. We have purchased several seasons of its DVDs. It turns out heartland was a key part of Stursberg's plans to make the CBC more relevant.

I can't attest to the accuracy of this first-person account. It certainly seems as if Stursburg is an excellent self-promoter. But, with that in mind, I think that his audacity has made for agreat read.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Michael Tuchscherer on May 11 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was quite surprised when I heard about his book on the CBC program Sunday Morning and wondered about his motivation for publishing it. As a CBC employee in English Services, I was eager to read Richard Stursberg's account.

I can't attest to the accuracy, completeness and impartiality of the CBC/SRC historical passages, but don't have any reason to doubt them. These accounts are used to frame his own personal experiences and provide excellent background and context. Even though I work there now and know something about the organization's evolution, I found it very educational to learn how his striving to drive change related to past events.

While I used to watch Richard Stursberg lead our "town hall" meetings, I was impressed by his swagger and confidence. It's amusing in the book how he demonstrates he's fully aware that some people view him as pompous. It's interesting to consider how likeability relates to his drive to both define success and to then succeed.

There are many funny passages that you don't have to be a CBC "insider" to understand and enjoy; the book is very accessible. I'd highly recommend it to anyone who has strong feelings about CBC. Though it doesn't leave one hopeful about the organization's future, it provides an excellent snapshot of management struggles behind the scenes and how they link to the audience experience.
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Format: Hardcover
Mr Stursberg's telling of his years (2004 - 2010) as head of CBC English services will be of interest to anyone who sees
"public" broadcasting as important in Canadian society. His story illustrates very clearly the difficulties faced by
anyone charged with deciding what the CBC should or can be doing, and how to do it. The first difficulty is that there seems to be no consensus among the Canadian public, politicians and the CBC board and executives as to what the purpose of
the CBC is.

When Stursberg took on the job, the CBC audience, especially for English TV, had been decreasing for years to a pitiful
level. "Why should public money be spent on such a minority audience" was a fair question. Some CBC tradionalists would
answer "the mandate", "quality" and "a higher purpose", which Stursberg calls "drivel". His answer was to promote popular
entertainment shows. "I have only one rule. Audiences matter." To the question "Why compete with the commercial stations
in producing light entertainment, which is already available in super abundance?" he answers that the popular shows on the
commercial channels are almost all American, because that's the cheapest way to make a profit. He did have significant
success in pushing the creation of Canadian shows, such as "Little Mosque on the Prairie" and several others, that gained
much larger audiences. This surely was a positive change. But he did also introduce "Jeopardy" and "Wheel of Fortune".

He felt that Radio 1 was doing well, having a substantial audience, mainly because commercial radio offered little besides
light music. But he did shake up news gathering and presentation on radio and TV.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Hmmmmm.... Feb. 27 2013
By Ron Holm - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
I really got tired of being insulted by the end of this book. But at least I know who to blame for the decline of the CBC.
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Scores to Settle June 17 2012
By Klarity (Toronto, Ontario, Canada) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have been a regular listener of CBC radio for years, as a well as an occasional viewer of CBC television, which is our Canadian "national public broadcast system". For as long as I have been listening and watching, and from what I can gather, well before that, there has been ongoing debate about the cost, purpose and yes, "Mandate" of the CBC. The last few years have been especially contentious, and so I was interested to hear what Richard Stursberg had to say. I had every reason to believe that it would not be a mild and cautious account, but was surprised by the venom on display. There was an unbelievable amount of self-justification and attacks on enemies high and low. Names are named, and revenge seems to be a primary goal here. It is kind of interesting to watch an ego like this lash out while trying to win over the reader's sympathy and the tone of the book reminds me of Nancy Reagan's seemingly angry and get-even memoir. I have not written an Amazon review before, but enjoy reading them. I decided it was time to step up and give some advice myself. If you work for the CBC, and know the players it may grip you, but this is a bitter book, and not worth a purchase.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Fascinating Peek Inside the CBC Sept. 6 2012
By Peter M. Holle - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As a long time CBC radio fan, Stursberg's book provides an entertaining insiders' look into Canada's public broadcaster. I have watched the CBC up its game over the past several years and its clear to me that Stursberg was the driving force behind the place's rejuvenation, or better said modernization, against a backdrop of a rapidly changing media marketplace. One has to fret that his departure may lead Mother Corp back to the yore of tedious left wing predictability that made it so irrelevant to a great majority of Canadians. In which case, the place's future again slips toward jeopardy.

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