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Tower and the Hive [School & Library Binding]

Anne McCaffrey
2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)

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Product Description

From Amazon

Anne McCaffrey concludes the saga of Angharad Gwyn, the Rowan, her husband Jeff Raven, and their family of powerful telepathically and telekinetically Talented offspring with The Tower and the Hive. ( The first four books in the series are: The Rowan, Damia, Damia's Children, and Lyon's Pride.) As usual, McCaffrey delivers vividly real characters struggling with personal, political, and ethical issues and finding humane solutions.

Federated Teleport and Telepath, dominated by the Gwyn-Raven clan, provides interstellar shipping and communications for the Star League of Humans and Mrdinis--weasel-like aliens. In following the aggressive, ant-like Hivers, whose "spheres" have repeatedly attacked League worlds, naval vessels have discovered many more habitable planets, including some occupied by Hivers. Who will get to colonize these planets, Humans or Mrdinis? Should all Hivers be destroyed, or is there some way to contain them? Where will more Talents to staff the vital Towers come from? And how best to defeat those whose resentment of the Gwyn-Raven family's powers and friendship with Mrdinis could lead to violence?

McCaffrey's protagonists are four Gwyn-Raven grandchildren, now young adults who find romance and mature while studying both alien races. Old and new fans alike can enjoy her masterful blending of scientific extrapolation and fantasy elements to produce a universe they'll leave regretfully. --Nona Vero --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Heres a happy ending to McCaffreys futuristic Rowan (aka the Talent) series (Lyons Pride, etc.), as Humans, their allies, the Mrdini, and the insectoid Hivers, who menace both, find ways to coexist. The main heroes are the Talented members of Federation Teleport and Telepath, dominated by the family that began the organization, but increasingly including different blood lines. McCaffrey provides an introduction, What Has Gone On Before, but its nearly as confusing as it is helpful. Fortunately, the narrative offers bountiful explanations of salient events and relationships, so all becomes clear as the story progresses. Few surprises are on hand, but the relationships among the parapsychically gifted Humans at FT&T are particularly well drawn, including the romantic subplots. Indeed, procreation is key, as readers follow the family dynasty of FT&T, the search for a solution to Mrdini overpopulation and the link between the Hivers queens and their spread to new worlds. The novel lacks the profound imagination of alien minds thats a hallmark of much recent SF, but it also avoids the kill-the-bugs outlook of such SF as Starship Troopers. Readers looking for intelligent, heroic adventure will find it here, and Rowan fans will be especially pleased at this felicitous closing of a popular SF series.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

YA-McCaffrey wraps up her saga of the Rowan and her offspring, three generations of parapsychics, as they try to defeat the alien Hiver menace while trying to thwart various intrigues from within. The Hivers, insectlike aliens, seek out planets to settle, destroying the life already there. Not as strong as the previous novels, this one meanders at times. However, readers will enjoy McCaffrey's fluid writing style and the continued development of the newer characters in the series. The Tower and the Hive does not stand well alone, even with the "What has gone before" summary. Nonetheless, libraries with a following for this popular series will want to purchase it.
John Lawson, Fairfax County Public Library, VA
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews

Fifth and, according to the publisher, last in the SF series (ranging from The Rowan, 1990, to Lyon's Pride, 1994, McCaffrey providing a solidly detailed synopsis) about the descendants of the prodigiously talented Rowan. Gifted with telepathic and teleportational abilities, these Talents are much in demand for star-spanning communications, freight movements, and so forth, working out of specially built Towers for Jeff Raven's Federated Teleport and Telepath organization. But complications have accumulated in this sprawling family saga. Some ungifted humans, jealously resenting FT&T's primacy and influence, have mounted a terrorist campaign to intimidate or destroy the Talented. The weasel-like alien Mrdini, Human allies, are allowing family members to raise `Dini children in their homes to foster mutual understanding and cooperationanother source of resentment among the Rowan families enemies. Both races are threatened by a third alien species, the insectoid and expansionist Hivers, who exterminate all competing life-forms on planets they select for colonization, rejecting all attempts at communication. Neither the ethical Humans nor Mrdini can simply obliterate them, so a family-inspired project gets underway to ascertain what drives Hiver expansion and if possible to modify that drive. The available Talents are few and constantly in demand, with some developing even more sophisticated abilitiesso how can Jeff ensure that future needs will be met? Cuddly family/romance/alien-contact saga with useful ideas but far too many characters distinguishable only by their silly names. Still, fans of the series will plunge right in. -- Copyright ©1999, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“Readers looking for intelligent, heroic adventure will find it here, and Rowan fans will be especially pleased at this felicitous closing of a popular SF series.”—Publishers Weekly
 
“A rousing conclusion to a most satisfying series.”—Booklist
 
“Fans of the series will plunge right in.”—Kirkus Reviews
 
“The fifth installment in the author’s Rowan series brings to a satisfying culmination the tale of three generations of a uniquely gifted family while leaving room for future novels. McCaffrey’s skillful storytelling and fluid writing…make this a necessary purchase.”—Library Journal
--This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

From the Inside Flap

The Bookcassette® format is a special recording technique developed as a means of condensing the full, unabridged audio text of a book to record it on fewer tapes. In order to listen to these tapes, you will need a cassette player with balance control to adjust left/right speaker output. Special adaptors to allow these tapes to be played on any cassette player are available through the publisher or some US retail electronics stores. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Anne McCaffrey, the Hugo Award-winning author of the bestselling Dragonriders of Pern® novels, is one of science fiction’s most popular authors. With Elizabeth Ann Scarborough she co-authored Changelings and Maelstrom, Books One and Two of The Twins of Petaybee. McCaffrey lives in a house of her own design, Dragonhold-Underhill, in County Wicklow, Ireland. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From AudioFile

Ericksen deserves a medal for pronouncing the names of the weasel-like aliens, the Mrdinis, in the series finale of the Rowan saga. The conclusion of the saga of Angharad Gwyn, the Rowan; her husband, Jeff Raven; and their large family of telepathic and telekinetic children mostly involves character development, with very little plot. Ericksen never stumbles over the strange names and maintains a lively pace to pique listeners' interest. When there is some action, her voice adds drama and tension. Series fans will enjoy but most audiobook devotees probably won't. S.C.A. © AudioFile 2000, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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