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The Town That Dreaded Sundown [Blu-ray + DVD]


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Frequently Bought Together

The Town That Dreaded Sundown [Blu-ray + DVD] + The Burning (Collector's Edition) [Blu-ray + DVD] + Captain America - Collector's Edition (Blu-Ray)
Price For All Three: CDN$ 57.94


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Product Details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • MPAA Rating: PG
  • Studio: Shout! Factory
  • Release Date: May 21 2013
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00BCMT2BI
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #5,064 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

A Texas ranger hunts for a hooded serial killer terrorizing the residents of a small town, set in 1946 Arkansas. Loosely based on a true story.

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Feb. 28 2004
Format: VHS Tape
Being originally from rural, small-town, Georgia, U.S.A., I can easily relate to the similar, real-life setting of Texarkana, Arkansas. Anyone looking for a high-quality, gripping, intense and suspenseful story, need look no further. It's made all the more horrific because it is based on real-life, unsolved serial killings in 1946 Texarkana. It is maybe somewhat deceptive and misleading to those viewers who are looking for horror films to rent or to buy. It's packaging may give the appearance of being just another cheap slasher or stalker film. The real surprise awaiting many unwary viewers may come when they discover that it is not just another cheap Friday the 13th or Halloween imitation, but in fact, actually pre-dates both films and their countless sequels. Ben Johnson, as he always did, made acting look easy, was such a wonderful and fine, natural, vastly underrated actor and gives an impressive performance here as Texas Ranger, Captain "Lone Wolf" J.D. Morales. Andrew Prine, as Miller County, Arkansas Deputy Sheriff Norman Ramsey, is great in a key supporting role. Dawn Wells (Mary Ann from Gilligan's Island) is very lovely and is also excellent in all too brief role, as a would-be victim of The Phantom Killer, Mrs. Helen Reed. The violence, although while it is quite jarring and effective, is generally low-key and takes place, thankfully, mostly off-camera. The main exception is the infamous "trombone" scene, while it is maybe not as graphically bloody and explicit by today's gorehound's highly questionable standards, it is always very hard to watch and is much more disturbing than the goriest scenes in the Friday the 13th films.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Ullery on Dec 17 2003
Format: VHS Tape
First an explanation: This movie loses one star for the lame attempts at humor inserted by director Charles B.Pierce, who should have known better. Beyond that criticism, though, this semi-documentary about a rash of brutal murders that held the small town of Texarkana , Arkansas in an icy grip of fear way back in 1946 is a top-notch suspense thriller. The killer is depicted as being as capable of "mad -dog" brutality as he was in reality ( the scene with the trombone will haunt you for days), and the low budget actually accentuates the grim circumstances unfolding in this movie. This film is very, very scary. It has also received recognition as being one of the more accurate depictions of a true life crime case that has ever hit the screen. If you like to be scared, then pop this one into the vcr, turn off the lights and get ready to have your nerves assaulted. Charles B.Pierce demonstrated with this feature that he knows how to play an audience. It's a shame he hasn't done anything even remotely noteworthy since. Ah, well. If this were his only film as a director, he could still beam with pride.
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By mykarenina on Nov. 26 2002
Format: VHS Tape
I am a true fan of horror movies. I love the "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" series. I am a fan of "Halloween." Every Friday the 13th I rent every "Friday the 13th" movie and stay up all night watching them...always with the lights out. Despite my wide-ranging horror film experience, I can honestly say that "The Town That Dreaded Sundown" scared me more than any other film to date.
Shot in 1976, this film presents the true story of a Texarkana, Arkansas crime spree in 1946. World War II had ended bringing the military boys back home and Texarkana was enjoying peace and prosperity. From the murky depths of night, a killer mysteriously emerged to taunt and terrorize the inhabitants of the quiet town. Young couples were attacked in their cars on lovers lane in intervals of 21 days...and even a famous Texas Ranger couldn't solve the case.
The story is presented in documentary style, with a narrator weaving direction through the onslaught of terror. There is no shock value to this movie. It is presented with raw facts and the chilling realization that this crime could happen anywhere at any time. The Phantom Killer of Texarkana, always wearing a hood to cover his face, left a crude and bloody path of destruction in his wake and throughout this film you can feel the terror gripping the tiny town. This movie is a necessary selection for anyone who loves sitting in the dark and being scintillatingly terrified or for anyone who simply enjoys a true unsolved mystery.
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By A Customer on July 30 2002
Format: VHS Tape
The Town That Dreaded Sundown is a must see, must have for
any fan of true crime or story telling movies.
Based on a real-life serial killer ....the actual case
was in its time known as the "moonlight murderer".
If you like being scared without being shocked this film
is very scary.
This movie is not a large budget,big name film...it
was made with the idea of getting a true life very
frightning account of murder on film.
I am a fan of Horror films such as Halloween and
friday the 13th films( by the way once you have seen
T.T.D.S you will see where the idea of jason
in a white mask originated)
I am a big fan of Charles B. Pierce and wish he was more
mainstream.Without giving away the plot this film reminds us
all that in life the good guys do not allways get their man.
I would love to have this film on dvd however I dont believe
its available on dvd.
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