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Troilus And Criseyde Paperback – Dec 12 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 1 pages
  • Publisher: WW Norton (Dec 12 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393927555
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393927559
  • Product Dimensions: 23.8 x 16.2 x 2.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 567 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #359,023 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By tepi on July 8 2001
Format: Paperback
CHAUCER : TROILUS AND CRISEYDE. Translated into Modern English by Nevill Coghill. 332 pp. New York : Viking Press, 1995 (Reissue). ISBN: 0140442391 (pbk.)
Nevill Coghill's brilliant modern English translation of Chaucer's 'The Canterbury Tales' has always been a bestseller and it's easy to understand why. Chaucer was an intensely human writer and a great comic artist, but besides the ribaldry and sheer good fun of 'The Canterbury Tales,' we also know he was capable of other things. His range was wide, and the striking thing about Coghill's translations are how amazingly faithful they are to the spirit of the originals - at times bawdy and hilariously funny, at other times more serious and moving when Chaucer shifts to a more poignant mode as in 'Troilus and Criseyde.'
But despite the brilliance of Coghill's translations, and despite the fact that they remain the best possible introduction to Chaucer for those who don't know Middle English, those who restrict themselves to Coghill are going to miss a lot - such readers are certainly going to get the stories, but they're going to lose much of the beauty those stories have in the original language. The difference is as great as that between a black-and-white movie and technicolor.
Chaucer's Middle English _looks_ difficult to many, and I think I know why. It _looks_ difficult because that in fact is what people are doing, they are _looking_ at it, they are reading silently and trying to take it in through the eye. This is a recipe for instant frustration and failure. But fortunately there is a quick and easy remedy.
So much of Chaucer's power is in the sheer music of his lines, and in their energy and thrust. He was writing when English was at its most masculine and vigorous.
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By A Customer on June 4 2004
Format: Paperback
Zero stars for "translations". If you enjoy Reader's Digest abridged books and the like then you might prefer a "translation" from English into English of Chaucer's epic. I read this for Chaucer's beautiful use of the English (well, okey, Middle English, but it's still English!) language. Modern writers are so superfluous! Now we write "Once you have come to possess something it is just as difficult to hold on to it as it was to get it in the first place", when once you could write, "As gret a craft is kep wel as wynne". How our language has deteriorated!
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By A Customer on June 1 1999
Format: Paperback
As usual, Chaucer has come through as the greatest poet of Middle English. This is by far the best expansion on Homer's epic poetry to appear since Publius Vergilius Maro's Æneid, and I'm sure Augustus would have enjoyed it just as much! Shakespeare's adaptation, Troilus and Cressida, is an excellent play but does not give this poem justice. I would definitely recommend it to any serious fan of English literature!
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By A Customer on Nov. 5 1998
Format: Paperback
Chaucer's mastery of English verse and the subtlety of his narrative make this poem a rare performance. The poem's evocation of the tragedy (and humor) inherent in a first, innocent love creates a mood or atmosphere difficult to describe but wonderful to enjoy. The closest analogue is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, but this is the more subtle work.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David Otero otero@fas.harvard.edu on Feb. 28 1998
Format: Paperback
Chaucer is pretty great, but this "lytel booke" stinks.
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