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Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life's Greatest Lesson Audio CD – Audiobook, Unabridged


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Product Details

  • Audio CD: 4 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Audio; Unabridged edition (June 1 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0739311123
  • ISBN-13: 978-0739311127
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 2.3 x 15.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 204 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,740 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #230,412 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

No one but Mitch Albom could have read Tuesdays with Morrie so effectively. As the author of this inspirational true story, Albom uses verbal inflection in exactly the right places to evoke humor, empathy, and emotion. It's an honest reading, and the underlying timbre of private memory pushes it past mere recitation to pure storytelling.

The titular Morrie was Morrie Schwartz, Albom's university professor 20 years before the events being narrated. An accidental viewing of an interview with Morrie on Nightline led Albom to become reunited with his old teacher, friend, and "coach" at a time when Albom, a successful sportswriter, was struggling to define dissatisfactions with his own life and career. Morrie, on the other hand, after a rich life filled with friends, family, teaching, and music, was dying from Lou Gehrig's disease, a crippling illness that diminished his activities daily. Albom was one of hundreds of former students and acquaintances who traveled great distances to visit Morrie in the final months of his life.

The 14 Tuesday visits that followed their reunion took Albom--and will take listeners with him--on a journey of reawakening to life's best rewards. The story is told in a journalistic style that never crosses into pathos. That a professional writer can write well is not surprising, but Albom also reads well, with clear enunciation and a talent for mimicry. Another reader might have interpreted the professor's aphorisms as droll humor or wrung a wrong note at an inappropriate moment, making the story a maudlin tearjerker; instead it is read for what it is, a tribute to a remarkable teacher. (Running time: four hours, three cassettes) --Brenda Pittsley --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

From Library Journal

A Detroit Free Press journalist and best-selling author recounts his weekly visits with a dying teacher who years before had set him straight.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
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First Sentence
The last class of my old professor's life took place once a week in his house, by a window in the study where he could watch a small hibiscus plant shed its pink leaves. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Diane Dickerson on June 22 2005
Format: Paperback
This book is easy to read and avoids the usual preachiness that I find in "inspirational" type books. Those two reasons alone would have been enough for me to give this book a positive review. But beyond the general aesthetic reasons, I found myself thinking about things in this book during normal, every day chores. I would wake up the next morning, to remember that I had been dreaming about a particular thought that Morrie had discussed with Mitch. A book that can have this type of lasting effect on me is something special in my opinion.
Morrie talked with Mitch about a lot of things that I know are troubling to me. Dying is something that I've always been afraid of. It's an unknown entity in which I am entirely powerless over. This combined with my confusion of the entire God/Religion thing is enough to keep me wondering. Mitch captured Morrie's thoughts perfectly and most importantly, succinctly. Everybody knows we're going to die, but nobody believes it. If we did, we would do things differently. Although Morrie was born a Jew, seldom did religion or the God thing come into conversation. Instead, he said things that just seemed to ring true for me. Once you learn how to die, you learn how to live. This particular quote sounded good but it wasn't until I heard Morrie's logic that the little bell went off in my head. Accepting that today is my last day of life, might make me less "ambitious," make me less caring about things that are pretty superficial like money, labels, and materialistic items. I thought about all of the stuff I would cut out of my life if I only had that one precious day left.
Each chapter (each visit) had a similar look and feel to them with Morrie sharing words of wisdom that seemed practical and common sense like.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Peck Ransom on Jan. 30 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It's no wonder that this simple well-told tale is back on the charts, high up there. It's not great literature like "Moby Dick" or some such heavy-handed book, but rather a heartfelt and touching look at life. I especially like the way the book unfolds: in a gentle manner with revelations coming mostly toward the end; the way it should be. If you haven't read this one, please do, along with Albom's "The Five People," which is also simple and good. No, his books are not "classics" or tomes that will probably be around forever, but they are inspiring and something we all need to read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By karen David-Richardson on Jan. 20 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of the most deeply moving books I have read. Infact, I have read it numerous times. To my mother, my dear friend who is legally blind,have given it as gifts to friends. I have seen the DVD, and watched a live theatrical performance. Need I say more. Mitch Album's wonderful narrative make for an easy yet touching read.If this book doesn't touch you deeply......I don't know what will.

P.S . This book will be more appealing to mature readers. Young readers (like my teenage son) may not really appreciate some of 'Life's Lessons' discussed in the novel since they are yet to experience the multiple facets of life.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Dec 16 2004
Format: Paperback
This is one of those books you will read again and again for the inspirational content alone. You follow the life of Morrie, he could be anyone,a man that lives and dies but does so in such a way as to not only teach the author but to teach us as well. Powerful lessons learned.
Also recommended: Other memoirs to read: Nightmares Echo, A Paper Life,I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings
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By Kathy Gabor on April 17 2010
Format: Paperback
This is the book I have read the most often, and I always get something new out of it each time. As a matter of fact, the very first time I read it, I cried a few tears upon finishing, and then immediately began it again.

The humanity, the humour, the joy and sadness, the wonderful way that Morrie has of explaining all the important facets of life, inluding death, are a real pleasure for the spirit.

I am an ESL teacher in Quebec and I have my Grade 11 students read it. Even my students who don't like to read (in French as well) really enjoy the book. Many of them ask me if they can hold on to it longer because their parents want to read it too (which I suppose is because it was recommended to them by their child). At the end of the year, I tell them that those who want to keep it can do so. 99% of them accept my offer and tell me that they will want to read it again when they are older. I find this particularly amazing because English is their second language and not all of them are star students.

I don't know anyone who read this book and wasn't touched by it.
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Format: Paperback
This book is easy to read and avoids the usual preachiness that I find in "inspirational" type books. Those two reasons alone would have been enough for me to give this book a positive review. But beyond the general aesthetic reasons, I found myself thinking about things in this book during normal, every day chores. I would wake up the next morning, to remember that I had been dreaming about a particular thought that Morrie had discussed with Mitch. A book that can have this type of lasting effect on me is something special in my opinion.
Morrie talked with Mitch about a lot of things that I know are troubling to me. Dying is something that I've always been afraid of. It's an unknown entity in which I am entirely powerless over. This combined with my confusion of the entire God/Religion thing is enough to keep me wondering. Mitch captured Morrie's thoughts perfectly and most importantly, succinctly. Everybody knows we're going to die, but nobody believes it. If we did, we would do things differently. Although Morrie was born a Jew, seldom did religion or the God thing come into conversation. Instead, he said things that just seemed to ring true for me. Once you learn how to die, you learn how to live. This particular quote sounded good but it wasn't until I heard Morrie's logic that the little bell went off in my head. Accepting that today is my last day of life, might make me less "ambitious," make me less caring about things that are pretty superficial like money, labels, and materialistic items. I thought about all of the stuff I would cut out of my life if I only had that one precious day left.
Each chapter (each visit) had a similar look and feel to them with Morrie sharing words of wisdom that seemed practical and common sense like.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

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