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Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life's Greatest Lesson Audio CD – Audiobook, Unabridged


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Amazon.ca First Novel Award - 6 Canadian Novels Make the Shortlist



Product Details

  • Audio CD: 4 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Audio; Unabridged edition (June 1 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0739311123
  • ISBN-13: 978-0739311127
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 2.4 x 15.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 204 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,749 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #148,253 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

This true story about the love between a spiritual mentor and his pupil has soared to the bestseller list for many reasons. For starters: it reminds us of the affection and gratitude that many of us still feel for the significant mentors of our past. It also plays out a fantasy many of us have entertained: what would it be like to look those people up again, tell them how much they meant to us, maybe even resume the mentorship? Plus, we meet Morrie Schwartz--a one of a kind professor, whom the author describes as looking like a cross between a biblical prophet and Christmas elf. And finally we are privy to intimate moments of Morrie's final days as he lies dying from a terminal illness. Even on his deathbed, this twinkling-eyed mensch manages to teach us all about living robustly and fully. Kudos to author and acclaimed sports columnist Mitch Albom for telling this universally touching story with such grace and humility. --Gail Hudson --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal

A Detroit Free Press journalist and best-selling author recounts his weekly visits with a dying teacher who years before had set him straight.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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First Sentence
The last class of my old professor's life took place once a week in his house, by a window in the study where he could watch a small hibiscus plant shed its pink leaves. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 13 2004
Format: Paperback
First the good news: Mitch Albom has done an excellent job of telling the story of a dying man. Albom writes vivid descriptions that made me feel I was actually there. The storytelling about Morrie's life is engaging and we truly care about him. We learn about the difference he has made in the world, and the lives he has touched.
However, if you are looking for deep philosophy about life and death you may be disappointed as I was. I had heard so many good things about this book I was hoping to get some new insights and guidance about life. Yet I found the information superficial. It felt like reading a series of newspaper stories rather than a book. Each of the write ups has more detail about relatively inconsequential matters such as what Morrie was wearing or the food Mitch brought over than Morrie's thoughts on life. In some cases we are treated to only a few sentences each on significant topics such as "Death" and "Fear of Aging."
I couldn't understand why there was so little "meat" to the book because Mitch had a tape recorder. Was Morrie so ill he barely spoke during their meetings? If so, why didn't Mitch tell us that? Did they talk about other matters and Morrie actually had very little to say about the significant topics covered in this book? I felt like Morrie's thoughts on life really weren't expressed through this book, although his spirit certainly lives on.
My sense is that this book will contain great insights to readers who have not previously given much thought to their purpose in life and their own mortality.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By karen David-Richardson on Jan. 20 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of the most deeply moving books I have read. Infact, I have read it numerous times. To my mother, my dear friend who is legally blind,have given it as gifts to friends. I have seen the DVD, and watched a live theatrical performance. Need I say more. Mitch Album's wonderful narrative make for an easy yet touching read.If this book doesn't touch you deeply......I don't know what will.

P.S . This book will be more appealing to mature readers. Young readers (like my teenage son) may not really appreciate some of 'Life's Lessons' discussed in the novel since they are yet to experience the multiple facets of life.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Peck Ransom on Jan. 30 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It's no wonder that this simple well-told tale is back on the charts, high up there. It's not great literature like "Moby Dick" or some such heavy-handed book, but rather a heartfelt and touching look at life. I especially like the way the book unfolds: in a gentle manner with revelations coming mostly toward the end; the way it should be. If you haven't read this one, please do, along with Albom's "The Five People," which is also simple and good. No, his books are not "classics" or tomes that will probably be around forever, but they are inspiring and something we all need to read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Dec 16 2004
Format: Paperback
This is one of those books you will read again and again for the inspirational content alone. You follow the life of Morrie, he could be anyone,a man that lives and dies but does so in such a way as to not only teach the author but to teach us as well. Powerful lessons learned.
Also recommended: Other memoirs to read: Nightmares Echo, A Paper Life,I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings
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By Mys M TOP 1000 REVIEWER on May 17 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the story of a young man who had been very close with his professor at university, and, although he promised to stay in touch after graduation, he hadn't. Then one night he was channel-hopping, and caught his "coach" on Nightline with Ted Koppel. Morrie Schwartz, a sociology professor at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, was talking about how he was coping with ALS. He told Ted and his audience,

. . . when all this started, I asked myself, 'Am I going to withdraw from the world, like most people do, or am I going to live.' I decided I'm going to live — or at least try to live — the way I want, with dignity, with courage, with humor, with composure.

And that's what he did! This man who had inspired so many students, had loved music, and loved to dance was slowly losing his muscle control. First, was the need for a cane. Shortly after he was diagnosed, Morrie entered his classroom of 30 years, slowly making his way to the front with his cane, and sat down to tell his students there was a risk in taking his class this term — he might die before it was over. When he attended the funeral of a colleague, using a wheelchair by now, he thought, "What a waste, all those people saying all those wonderful things, and Irv never got to hear any of it." So Morrie gathered some friends and family together one Sunday afternoon for what he called "a living funeral." They laughed, they cried, told stories, and paid tribute, and it was "a rousing success."

Mitch made a phone call after watching the Koppel show, and went to pay his "coach" a visit. It was the beginning of what became known to both Mitch and Morrie, as his final course — how one faces death — with a class of one!
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