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Turtle Conservation [Hardcover]

Michael Klemens
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Book Description

Dec 12 2012
Considering the most significant problems facing turtles and tortoises worldwide, Michael Klemens and eighteen international experts on turtle biology and conservation chart successes and failures of past conservation programs, discuss the use of genetics and demography in turtle conservation, and propose more effective strategies that take into account chelonian biology as well as the economic and social situations that affect turtle conservation efforts.

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Format:Hardcover
-Turtle Conservation is a much-needed overview of the problems facing turtle populations in the world today. Klemens and company make a critical assessment of the threats facing turtles and the solutions often propounded to save them. The sad state of the world's turtle populations is made clear (as Klemens notes, turtles may be in as much trouble as amphibians, but haven't received as much attention), and the causes of decline are reviewed in chapters covering groups of turtles inhabiting different general habitats (marine, river, still freshwater, and terrestrial), as well as the effectiveness of various conservation methods for the unique needs of each group. A common thread in all the chapters is that the techniques that have been employed (headstarting, farming, "sustainable harvest," etc) to conserve turtles in the past are largely "halfway technologies," which treat symptoms and not causes of decline. The message is that less "hands on" approaches are the most effective in the long run, which means habitat conservation and better planning of development. This is not a picture book or an introduction to turtle biology, but a critical look at the conservation needs of turtles. It gives practical information and suggestions on how to protect our dwindling turtle populations. I recommend this authoritative book not only for those interested in turtle conservation (for whom it is required reading), but anyone interested in conservation of biological diversity, because it illustrates how each group of organisms has its own specific conservation needs, and yet how all are joined by the same requirement for habitat conservation.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent overview of the conservation of turtles Dec 10 2000
By Mark Lethaby - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
-Turtle Conservation is a much-needed overview of the problems facing turtle populations in the world today. Klemens and company make a critical assessment of the threats facing turtles and the solutions often propounded to save them. The sad state of the world's turtle populations is made clear (as Klemens notes, turtles may be in as much trouble as amphibians, but haven't received as much attention), and the causes of decline are reviewed in chapters covering groups of turtles inhabiting different general habitats (marine, river, still freshwater, and terrestrial), as well as the effectiveness of various conservation methods for the unique needs of each group. A common thread in all the chapters is that the techniques that have been employed (headstarting, farming, "sustainable harvest," etc) to conserve turtles in the past are largely "halfway technologies," which treat symptoms and not causes of decline. The message is that less "hands on" approaches are the most effective in the long run, which means habitat conservation and better planning of development. This is not a picture book or an introduction to turtle biology, but a critical look at the conservation needs of turtles. It gives practical information and suggestions on how to protect our dwindling turtle populations. I recommend this authoritative book not only for those interested in turtle conservation (for whom it is required reading), but anyone interested in conservation of biological diversity, because it illustrates how each group of organisms has its own specific conservation needs, and yet how all are joined by the same requirement for habitat conservation.
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