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Twelve Fantasias for Violin Solo.


Price: CDN$ 51.95
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Sept. 1 1998)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: SRI Canada
  • ASIN: B0000007EP
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #143,768 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Fantasia 1 in B flat
2. Fantasia 2 in G
3. Fantasia 3 in F-minor
4. Fantasia 4 in D
5. Fantasia 5 in A
6. Fantasia 6 in E minor
7. Fantasia 7 in E-flat
8. Fantasia 8 in E
9. Fantasia 9 in B minor
10. Fantasia 10 in D
11. Fantasia 11 in F
12. Fantasia 12 in A minor
13. Gulliver Suite : I Intrada
14. Gulliver Suite : II Chaconne of the Lilliputians
15. Gulliver Suite : III Gigue of the Brobdingngians
16. Gulliver Suite : IV Daydreams of the Laputians and their attendant flappers
17. Gulliver Suite : V Loure of the well-mannered Houyhnhnms & Wild dance of the untamed Yahoos

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
Telemann's 12 Fantasias for solo violin (1735) are intriguingly elusive. Their brief movements offer a whirlwind tour of European manners and styles. The player's resources are laid bare -- no overarching formal design (this isn't Bach), and few openings for virtuosic display.
Andrew Manze is a star of the period-instrument set. Lightning reflexes (and wits) and improvisatory flair are his strengths -- precisely what this music demands. His playing is a catalog of riches. Compare two concluding allegros -- No. 4, with its bustling near-orchestral accompaniment sharply set against the melody, and No. 11, all fantastic lightness. Or the Italianate curves of No. 6's graceful Siciliana. Caroline Balding seconds Manze impeccably in the encore, a playful suite inspired by "Gulliver's Travels."
The sound is typical of Harmonia Mundi's best -- a close, unimpeded perspective, as mellow as it is brilliant.
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Format: Audio CD
This is an extremely enjoyable, listenable disk. I love the Bach solo sonatas but they should not be compared to the Telemann, which is a completely different thing, "easy listening" by comparison and full of memorable tunes. The disk does not wear thin. It's sitting in my car CD player right now and I must have listened to it 25 times and simply haven't been motivated to replace it, because I haven't gotten tired of it!
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Format: Audio CD
OK.
Call me heretical, but these gloriously wayward Telemann "Fantasias" for solo violin are far more attractive, melodious, mysterious and accessible than Bach's austere unaccompanied Sonatas/Partitas or Biber's scratchy, pedantic ramblings.
OK. In fact, I think they are the best works for violin that I have heard in ages, bar none. There. I said it.
Although Leslie Gerber, see above, "advises" against listening to all the Fantasias at one sitting, I believe the contrary true. You will, too.
Why? Because Manze, performing on a Gagliano (1783), continually hypnotizes us, his violin captured beautifully in an immensely flattering acoustic, never acerbic or irritating, but resonating with a tone much richer and darker-hued and "vocal" than we are used to in a period instrument. (For this reason, as well, I disagree with Gramophone's assessment that the baroque fiddle used here creates a "biting astringency"---e.g. Fantasia No. 6, they suggest. Oh, no. Hardly. Quite the opposite.)
The Fantasias, themselves, are marvelous, phantasmagorical "inventions" of infinite wonder and design, yet retain a staggering ability to appear completely improvisational. That Manze is committed to these incredible pieces is unquestionable. His playing is simply stunning, without drawing attention to his own phenomenal virtuosity or the extreme difficulties inherent in each Fantasia.
And, of course, Telemann's music is stunning, as well. His Twelve Fantasias, for me, go far beyond the sound worlds of either Bach or Biber in both depth of emotion and an obvious vulnerability. There is little rhetoric here, only a passionate musical honesty that seems to well up from the composer's very soul.
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By A Customer on Sept. 19 1998
Format: Audio CD
I bought the Fantasias for Solo Violin from three different interprets. The other two were Sarnau and Dubeau. The main difference is IMHO that Manze read the title: he really plays fantasies. I can only recommend this CD. My advice for violinists: get all the three editions and compare it yourself.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
33 of 36 people found the following review helpful
MAGICAL, MYSTICAL, TERRIFIC TELEMANN! Sept. 26 2000
By Melvyn M. Sobel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Telemann's Twelve Fantasias extend far beyond the sound worlds of either Bach or Biber in both depth of emotion and an obvious vulnerability. There is little rhetoric here, only a passionate musical intensity that seems to well up from the composer's very soul. Manze, performing on a Gagliano (1783), continually hypnotizes, his violin captured beautifully in an immensely flattering acoustic, never acerbic, but resonating with a tone much richer and darker-hued and "vocal" than is common with period instruments. The Fantasias, themselves, are marvelous, phantasmagorical "inventions" of infinite wonder and design, yet retain a staggering ability to appear completely improvisational. That Manze is committed to these incredible pieces is unquestionable. His playing is simply stunning, without drawing attention to his own phenomenal virtuosity or the extreme difficulties inherent in each Fantasia. The "Gulliver Suite" for two violins (with Caroline Balding playing a 1783 Amati/Cremona), derived, obviously, from Swift's book, is, at just over seven minutes, a pleasant diversion that brings upbeat closure to the CD.

[Running time: 78:18]
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
A Catalog of Riches Nov. 6 2001
By "blankwal" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Telemann's 12 Fantasias for solo violin (1735) are intriguingly elusive. Their brief movements offer a whirlwind tour of European manners and styles. The player's resources are laid bare -- no overarching formal design (this isn't Bach), and few openings for virtuosic display.
Andrew Manze is a star of the period-instrument set. Lightning reflexes (and wits) and improvisatory flair are his strengths -- precisely what this music demands. His playing is a catalog of riches. Compare two concluding allegros -- No. 4, with its bustling near-orchestral accompaniment sharply set against the melody, and No. 11, all fantastic lightness. Or the Italianate curves of No. 6's graceful Siciliana. Caroline Balding seconds Manze impeccably in the encore, a playful suite inspired by "Gulliver's Travels."
The sound is typical of Harmonia Mundi's best -- a close, unimpeded perspective, as mellow as it is brilliant.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Love this disk - can hardly get enough of it July 13 2001
By Frank Paris - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is an extremely enjoyable, listenable disk. I love the Bach solo sonatas but they should not be compared to the Telemann, which is a completely different thing, "easy listening" by comparison and full of memorable tunes. The disk does not wear thin. It's sitting in my car CD player right now and I must have listened to it 25 times and simply haven't been motivated to replace it, because I haven't gotten tired of it!
13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
The best CD I ever bought. Sept. 19 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I bought the Fantasias for Solo Violin from three different interprets. The other two were Sarnau and Dubeau. The main difference is IMHO that Manze read the title: he really plays fantasies. I can only recommend this CD. My advice for violinists: get all the three editions and compare it yourself.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Depth Music July 22 2007
By HSIEH CHENG CHUNG - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
If you ever listenned telemann's tafelmusik, I believe you would know what I mean. In past experenice, telemann was often argued lack of depth, and was famous of easygoing music, at least comparied with Bach. However, telemann fantasias had changed my image, it is a depth music, especial after that heard other his music. I don't think its value is lower than Bach uncompanied solo violin music.
Of course maybe it's Manze's technique give me this feeling, but finally, I could say I must reknow telemann and it's Manze's contribution. I recommand it to all.

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