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Under the Bed [Import]

4 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product Details

  • Format: Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Xlrator
  • Release Date: July 30 2013
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • ASIN: B00C2R122Y
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Product Description

Under The Bed

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By The Movie Guy HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Nov. 9 2015
Format: DVD
Neal (Jonny Weston) a moody, mumbling high school student has been away living with Aunt Sarah for two years following the fire incident. He is coming home with his less than understanding father (Peter Holden) to reunite with his younger brother Paulie (Gattlin Griffith) and meet his new step mother Angela (Musetta Vander). As the film progresses we find out more about the fire incident and the thing that lives under the bed.

I liked how they did the horror and creep factor in the film. It didn't come at you constantly so you didn't get numb to it. There were a number of things that made me scratch my head.

1) Neal was gone for 2 years. Paulie was 3 when he left. He is clearly well older than 5, more like 10 or 11.
2) Angela experiences an early encounter, then acts like nothing happened.
3) Paulie has been sleeping in the same room as this thing for years which seems absurd.
4) Dad forces them to sleep in the haunted room to prove a point.

I felt like there were some missing scenes. Makes for a good rental. Watch it for the scare and try not to think too much about the plot.

Parental Guide: 4 F-bombs (my count). No sex or nudity.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa62b324c) out of 5 stars 101 reviews
24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa642851c) out of 5 stars Great Old School Thrills! June 27 2013
By StevenC - Published on Amazon.com
I rented this based on viewing The Aggression Scale & Silent Night. Loved those two films and absolutely enjoyed this one! If you are a kid who grew up in the 80s, then this film is pure nostalgia with a modern clean look. Was surprised by the creature effects and design. Everything was really well done. It wasn't particularly scary but I suspect it wasn't suppost to be. It felt more like a brother adventure that dipped into some gruesome horror moments. Lots of fun!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa638d228) out of 5 stars THAT MUMBLING THING July 21 2013
By The Movie Guy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Neal (Jonny Weston) a moody, mumbling high school student has been away living with Aunt Sarah for two years following the fire incident. He is coming home with his less than understanding father (Peter Holden) to reunite with his younger brother Paulie (Gattlin Griffith) and meet his new step mother Angela (Musetta Vander). As the film progresses we find out more about the fire incident and the thing that lives under the bed.

I liked how they did the horror and creep factor in the film. It didn't come at you constantly so you didn't get numb to it. There were a number of things that made me scratch my head.

1) Neal was gone for 2 years. Paulie was 3 when he left. He is clearly well older than 5, more like 10 or 11.
2) Angela experiences an early encounter, then acts like nothing happened.
3) Paulie has been sleeping in the same room as this thing for years which seems absurd.
4) Dad forces them to sleep in the haunted room to prove a point.

I felt like there were some missing scenes. Makes for a good rental. Watch it for the scare and try not to think too much about the plot.

Parental Guide: 4 F-bombs (my count). No sex or nudity.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa628b8f4) out of 5 stars 2 1/2 stars Aug. 1 2015
By Tim Janson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
What kid hasn’t gone to bed at night thinking there was a monster lurking under his bed or in his closet? Under the Bed expands on that idea but fails to actually run with it. Teenager Neal Hausman has returned home after living out of state with family for two years. Neal was sent away by his father, Terry, after the death of his mother in a fire, which local gossip blames on Neal.

Neal’s reunion is not a happy one. His always angry father is on him constantly to group and be a man, and his new stepmom is trying too hard to get to know him. All Neal cares about is his little brother Paulie. He discovers that Paulie is being tormented by the same evil entity that lived under Neal’s bed, turning his nights into living nightmares. Dad dismisses the boy’s claims of monsters as foolish nonsense, locking them in their room at night. But there is something underneath their bed, something which creeps out and forces the boys to sleep on their dressers at night. They have to destroy the creature before it destroys their family.

Under the Bed is an interesting concept but Director Steven C. Miller and Writer Eric Stolze fail to do much with the idea. Unlike similar films like Darkness Falls or The Boogeyman, Under the Bed fails to develop much of a mythology to capture the viewer’s interest. What is the monster? Where does it come from? Why is it haunting these two particular boys? Those questions are never answered and as such, the film plays like an extended episode of Goosebumps. Furthermore Miller contradicts himself when in one part, Neal says the monster is bound to their beds, but in another, the creature harasses stepmom Angela in the garage laundry room and later shows up at the neighbor’s house when the boys are spending the night.

The two leads Jonny Weston and Gattlin Griffith do a strong job throughout, particularly in conveying the sense of stress that comes with sleep deprivation but they simply are not giving much to work with. Add to that cheap creature effects and Under the Bed should have remained there permanently.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa638d2dc) out of 5 stars My advice, don't waste your money on this movie! April 3 2015
By Jennifer - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I'm using my mother's account firstly. I'm 17, and i love horror movies. I watch them a lot, more so right now since I'm able to get them on amazon's instant video. I read reviews before selecting a movie to watch. I read the reviews for Under The bed, and didn't see any dislikes, so I bought it. That was a mistake. The first signs of the thing under the bed is a bit creepy, but as the movie went on, I found myself bored and asking myself "why am I still watching this?" Of course this is just my opinion,but this movie is not worth the money to rent it, especially not to buy it. Thanks for reading! :)
23 of 33 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa62b2a68) out of 5 stars BWAAAAAAARRRRRRRRMMMMMMMM! Aug. 8 2013
By Mark Eremite - Published on Amazon.com
This film begins with a surly teen (Neil) being driven by his father back home. The conversation they have is vague, but it is clear that a) the boy has been staying with an aunt for a couple years ever since he caused some kind of horrible accident at home, b) his relationship with his father is strained at best, and c) he has a younger brother named "Paulie" that he misses and worries about. He gets home, and as soon as he sees his old house, his eyes widen and his face locks in a sort of sexy-ish version of freaked out (get used to this facial expression), the camera zooms in on him and zooms in on the house and zooms in on him and tilts at a threatening angle and you hear a bunch of brass instruments (tubas and the like) bellow a bombastic "BWAAAAAAAARRRRRMMMMM!" in the soundtrack, letting viewers know that this is scary. This house. Or something.

He has some of the world's most awkward conversations with some of the world's flattest characters, giving them all a hearty dose of barely-strained surliness before he decides to go into the house to see Paulie. He steps up to the entrance to the door. His eyes grow dark and wide and freaked out, the camera frames him in a bad boy pose as he hesitates before the entrance, and the soundtrack clobbers you with another "BWAAAAAAAARRRRRRRMMMMMM!"

This kind of thing happens, by my count, another twenty to fifty times. I can see why the filmmakers did it. It is very addictive. Whenever I do anything in my apartment now, I scream, "BWAAAAAARRRRRRMMMMM!" to preface it. I open the cabinet for some soup? "BWAAAAAARRRRRRMMMMM!" I get out the can opener? "BWAAAAAARRRRRMMMMM!" It drives my girlfriend up the wall.

This movie thinks it's scary, and it lets you know from frame one. It is not. It barely even makes sense. Neil and Paulie are afraid of some kind of bloodthirsty, otherworldly creature that lives under Neil's bed. Where did it come from? What does it want? To what rules does its universe adhere? Who knows! Certainly not the movie. There are hints here and there, but mostly it's just bizarre pointlessness that crumbles under the slightest analysis, like some kind of ultra-buttery Jenga stack.

It's not just the creature that makes no sense. Our father character goes nuts like a prison hoe-down at the drop of a hat. Neil seems to have some kind of split personality disorder, and the script can't decide what age Paulie is supposed to be. Other characters -- the bullies, the love interest, the step mother -- may as well just be cardboard cutouts with articulated jaws.

When the monster finally stops playing peek-a-boo and starts getting all up in everyone's faces, the film gets the burst of energy and "holy crap!"-itude that it has wanted to have from the first BWAAAAAAARRRRRRRRMMMMMMMM! Of course, the monster's sudden attack of moxie also doesn't make any sense given the meager exposition we've been fed, but by that point you're likely not to care, grateful just to be spared another excruciatingly vague conversation or completely out-of-the-blue familial yelling match. The heck-raising doesn't last long, though, and it is aborted -- true to form -- in ludicrous, head-scratching style, with not even a smidgen of closure. You'd think out of respect to the audience that they'd reveal something to tie up one of the dozens of loose ends, or fill in just a few of the massive logical gaps, but nope.

Although, to be fair, the final shot of the movie DOES have an extra long BWWWAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRMMMMMMM! over it, so I guess you take what you can get.

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