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Unjust Enrichment Hardcover – Jan 1 2001


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Stackpole Books (Jan. 1 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0811718441
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811718448
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 15.9 x 2.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 517 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #301,385 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

In September 1999, some 500 American WWII veterans filed suit against five Japanese corporations (including Mitsubishi and Kawasaki), seeking reparation for having been used as slave laborers during the war. According to the plaintiffs, these corporations built their postwar success on a foundation of American forced labor. The companies say they have been wrongly targeted, because the modern conglomerates have no relation to the wartime entities accused of these practices, prohibited now as then under the rules of the Geneva Convention. Holmes (4,000 Bowls of Rice), a respected historian and researcher who is part of a presidential panel working to declassify the records of Nazi war crimes, weighs in heavily on the side of the former American POWs. Using recently declassified documents, Holmes bolsters the vets' claims. (One formerly top secret Japanese cable read, "Due to a serious shortage of labor power in Japan, the use of the white POW is earnestly desired.") But the most emotionally charged evidence comes from the former POWs themselves. In interview after interview, Holmes chronicles the abuse of American captives, whose lingering medical and emotional problems are compounded by the belief that their suffering has been minimized by a postwar culture more moved by the plight of other groups of war victims. (Feb. 19) Forecast: A front-page New York Times article on October 2, 2000, broke news of the case on a national level. This book provides a foundation for further media coverage, and should be widely cited. Meanwhile, buffs and vets will find out about the book via newsgroups and the like.
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

The opening battles of World War II brought the Japanese a significant number of American prisoners of war, a prize composed of some 26,000 captured military and 14,000 interned civilians. For the most part, these prisoners were treated badly, and a disproportionate number died or suffered lifelong disabilities. This is scarcely news. Holmes claims to bring to the table newly released information about the roles of the zaibatsus, the great industrial combines, in the use of forced labor. She also has located information relating to the State Department decision not to prosecute the companies or their leaders after the war, although numerous camp commandants and guards were treated as war criminals. In contrast to recent payments by various European corporations, notes Holmes, no compensation has been paid by Japanese companies. She asserts but does not convincingly prove that many successful Japanese companies, such as Mitsubishi, succeeded in the postwar era because of the unreasonable profits they reaped by using slave labor, a large part of which was American. Given the scale of the war, the immense destruction on the home islands, and the generally low productivity of forced labor, it is difficult to see this one factor as paramount in the rebuilding of Japanese industrial strength. Libraries collecting deeply in Japanese-American relations and World War II history may be interested. Edwin B. Burgess, U.S. Army Combined Arms Research Lib., Fort Leavenworth, KS
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Format: Hardcover
I always knew of the atrocities set upon the world by the Nazis in WWll. I knew there were prisoners of war in the Pacific. I did not know that 9 out of every 10 prisoners of war who died in captivity, died due to Japanese hands. I did not know that "white" prisoners of war were sold into slave labor to the major corporations in Japan. I now know that the companies we Americans helped to rebuild after the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, have yet to apologize to us for the treatment the prisoners received. I read. I learned. I learned that until apologies come forth, I will not support Japanese companies in any way. While it is true that the people running the companies now were probably not even born yet, it would honor the memories of their ancestors, if an apology came forth. The honor would come back with honesty, and maybe their grandfathers' souls can rest.
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Format: Hardcover
This is a fascinating book about a chapter of our WW II experience that should have been told before now. Our prisoners in the Pacific were inhumanely treated, and we owe it to them to hear how they suffered, and to help them get compensation. German companies are coming forward to pay for the slave labor they used during WW II. It is about time that our men in the Pacific also received compensation for their work and suffering.
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Format: Hardcover
The events of this book were some of the most horrific from World War II and to wait this long to tell me them was a crime in itself. How could this nation have let this happen, I pray these men will forgive their peers and superiors for this unjust act. We should boycott this industries as a nation and show our soladarity with those brave men who endure almost 3 years of brutality at the hands of our enemy at the time.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By lordhoot on Dec 30 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book proves to be a great case study for these POWs who suffered in Japan during World War II. While there is no question that they did, the question lies in what does this book mean?
In a time of war, unjust and unfair things happens. Its the dirty, dishonorable and unglorious part of any war. These POWs were warriors who took their chances and paid the penalty for their country. They were also unfortunate that the Pacific War was a race war where both sides reduces each other to sub-human levels. Racial hatred is the lowest mean of human emotion and outlook. Are we surprised that they were treated like sub-humans?
Our nation also did many things during that war which we were not so proud. We fire bombed cities and people like barbeue. This meant schools, hospitals and civilian homes were cooked up like Sunday picnic (with women and children, of course). But this too, is part of war and it will always be that way.
If we fought a honorable war and they did not, then there is just cause. But if both sides fought dirty, using POWs as slaves was one way to the means for the Japanese trying to win that war.
Only way the author and her cause can win - will be by changing or rebuking the peace treaty with Japan - who just happened to be our most strongest ally and trading partner in the Pacific. This is a nice way to win trust and maintain friendship. Americans seem to forget that they have a nasty history of breaking or foregoing treaties with non-white people as the American Indians can understand. Are treaty with the Japanese just as expendable??
Author also point out with certain racist overtone that American government was justified in rounding up American citizens of Japanese descent because the Japanese army rounded out American citizens in their areas of conquest.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 18 reviews
24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
Upon the heads of your grandfathers Feb. 1 2001
By Mark B. Golden - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I always knew of the atrocities set upon the world by the Nazis in WWll. I knew there were prisoners of war in the Pacific. I did not know that 9 out of every 10 prisoners of war who died in captivity, died due to Japanese hands. I did not know that "white" prisoners of war were sold into slave labor to the major corporations in Japan. I now know that the companies we Americans helped to rebuild after the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, have yet to apologize to us for the treatment the prisoners received. I read. I learned. I learned that until apologies come forth, I will not support Japanese companies in any way. While it is true that the people running the companies now were probably not even born yet, it would honor the memories of their ancestors, if an apology came forth. The honor would come back with honesty, and maybe their grandfathers' souls can rest.
17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
A story that had to be told April 22 2001
By Roderick C. Hall - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is a fascinating book about a chapter of our WW II experience that should have been told before now. Our prisoners in the Pacific were inhumanely treated, and we owe it to them to hear how they suffered, and to help them get compensation. German companies are coming forward to pay for the slave labor they used during WW II. It is about time that our men in the Pacific also received compensation for their work and suffering.
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
could not believe it July 19 2002
By Terrence Murrell Mark Jr - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The events of this book were some of the most horrific from World War II and to wait this long to tell me them was a crime in itself. How could this nation have let this happen, I pray these men will forgive their peers and superiors for this unjust act. We should boycott this industries as a nation and show our soladarity with those brave men who endure almost 3 years of brutality at the hands of our enemy at the time.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Unjust Enrichment, A Service to Truth Jan. 14 2008
By Steven George Bustin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A book such as this undoubtedly angers some and disturbs others but educates all that are willing to look at what can be for many, an uncomfortable truth. This is not simply the story of POWs being used by the host nation as a labor source, as all nations essentially did that in WWII. And this is not simply an issue of the cruelty of the Japanese military in dealing with Allied POWs and civilians, that too is well documented and accepted. This book stands out because it addresses the comprehensive and systemic system of Japanese abuse of Allied POWs for the direct benefit of Japanese companies, benefits that carried neatly and powerfully into Post-War Japan. Author Holmes does an excellent job of telling individual stories in the greater criminal context of the plans and execution of both Japanese industry and the Japanese government. This is a powerful and disturbing book, as well-written books addressing the truth often are, but is also an engaging and incredibly informative work that explains, educates and even begins to heal those involved. A must read for serious historians and those interested in WWII.
Steven Bustin, Author: Humble Heroes, How The USS Nashville CL43 Fought WWII Humble Heroes: How the USS Nashville Fought WWII
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
reality is such a hard concept for humans to grasp April 21 2013
By gary l miller - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
American politicians are the lowest of the low!!
this book is well written & referenced,
Linda Goetz tells all in this politically incorrect book


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