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Unwilling Bride Hardcover – Large Print, Jun 1 2001


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 581 pages
  • Publisher: Thorndike Press; Lrg edition (June 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786233346
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786233342
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 13.1 x 3.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 703 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,030,852 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Flora E Olivera on May 19 2004
Format: Hardcover
First of all, I purchased this book because the back summary made the book seem passionate and original. I wanted to see what Beth would do with the marriage she is forced into. I thought she would use her wit and intelligence to ensnare her new husband. I thought there would at least be some sexual tension. However this is not the case at all. Beth in fact goes out of her way to make herself unattractive to her future husband, like snipping off her bow from her modcap before she first meets him. This is supposed to make us cheer her on, but I felt more frustrated. The hero, Lucien, is so shallow that without even knowing the character of the heroine, tells her he finds her "unattractive". This is what she wants, but she still feels hurt by his comment (FRUSTRATING!!!). This pretty much happens throughout the whole book. She goes out of her way to seem unaffected by him and he goes out of his way to hurt her. I really don't like the way JB forced the reader to read the interaction between Beth (who we're not even sure Lucien loves) and his mistress Blanche (who JB lets us know he does love). There is absolutely no chemistry whatsoever between Lucien and Beth. Lucien admits even after they are married that he felt no pressing need to make love to his wife. What galls me the most is that there is more passion between Lucien and Blanche than between Lucien and the woman he "loves" Beth. Then there's the back-handed slap. There were many times that JB could have made Lucien feel jealousy towards Beth, but didn't.Instead we are left with the impression that he slaps her because of wounded pride. Strangely this is the first show of any sort of intense feeling toward Beth and it falls flat.There was no justification for it.Read more ›
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By LBM TOP 500 REVIEWER on Jan. 7 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
First, and most importantly : this book is a REPRINT (from 1992), which the "Product Details" should indicate, instead of a 2011 date. However, I either must have missed it the first time around, or forgotten reading it, because I have read all of the other books in the "Rogues" series. This is the weakest. I am not panning it for the threatening and ultimately violent character of the "hero", though I prefer my romance novels without that element. What bothered me more was that the heroine was the stereotypical "feminist ninny", who purports to hold progressive modernist views about female freedom, but almost immediately "unemancipates" herself and succumbs to a life of contented luxury and patriarchy. Beth gives feminism a bad name. She spends most of the book agonizing over a choice she's already made. It's boring - and the abrupt declaration of mutual devotion that occurs is jarring. As well, the book references two great previous Beverley characters - Nicholas and Eleanor Delaney - against whom Lucien and Beth suffer dramatically by comparison.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I absolutely loved the book . Lucien de Vaux is a handsome, charming regency buck and Beth Armitage is an intelligent independent school teacher ( commoner)who dislikes the aristocracy. The two are forced into an arranged marriage and the intellectual sparring between the two is perhaps the most interesting part of their romance. Lucien discovers to his great surprise that he is attracted to her mind and sparkling wit and Beth finds herself falling in love with the handsome aristocrat much against her strong beliefs that the aristocracy are frivolous. Reading about how these two unlikely people with all their misgivings from such different backgrounds get to understand each other and fall in love is the charm of the book. I love that the author has created an intelluctual attraction between the two , a refreshing change when most romances are built around physical attraction and beauty. It is nice to see that a man can fall just as hard for a woman's brain.One review I read said that there was no passion between the two , but I felt plenty of it all through the book.I like that they become friends before becoming intimate even after they are married. Hats off to Lucien for his good sense and self control, in befriending her first before the passionate sex.In most of the regency romances, the man just feels it his right to bed his wife whether she is ready or not.This hugely elevated my opinion of Lucien.The scene where he backhanded her was not one of my favorite , but he was really sorry about it and truth be told ,her lie to him at the start of the story was partly responsible for it and Heck, if she could forgive him , why cant we ???.They both change into better persons as they discover their love for each other .Read more ›
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By A Customer on May 13 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
What appalled me more than Lucien's backhand was Beth's reaction to it. Instead of hitting him back (my preferred reaction) or taking him to task, she forgives him and shoulders most of the blame. The whole interaction disgusted me. I don't mind that the man had a temper. In fact, I think an angry man can be a sexy man. But he should have hit the wall or thrown a priceless vase. He shouldn't have hit a defenseless, innocent woman.
Lucien is NOT a hero, a man, or anyone I could admire or root for. He is a spineless coward who uses his fists against people who are no match for him physically. And then to say he did it because he loves her so much - UGH! He's a wife beater and I wish instead of forgiving him, Beth would have kneed him in the balls.
I'm not sure I can ever read another Jo Beverly. This was my first and it really turned me off.
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