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Up In Honey's Room Unabridged Cd Paperback – Audiobook, Apr 26 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: William Morrow; Unabridged edition (April 26 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061149780
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061149788
  • Product Dimensions: 17.2 x 16.5 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,924,146 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Set in the waning days of WWII, bestseller Leonard's disappointing 40th novel finds gunslinging U.S. marshal Carl Webster, introduced in 2005's The Hot Kid, on the trail of Jurgen Schrenk and Otto Penzler, German POWs escaped from their Okmulgee, Okla., detention camp. The pair wind up in Detroit in the care of Walter Schoen, a butcher and Himmler look-alike, with whose ex-wife, wisecracking bottle-blonde Honey Deal, Carl soon finds himself smitten. While married Carl contemplates breaking his marriage vows (Honey does anything but dissuade him), Otto disappears and a dysfunctional German spy ring—led by hard-drinking Vera Mezwa and her cross-dressing manservant, Bohdan—cozies up with Jurgen. Vera and Bohdan, meanwhile, are secretly planning to disappear, but Bohdan wants to put in the ground anyone who could later give them up to the Feds. Leonard's writing—line by line—is as sharp as ever, but the plotting is uncharacteristically clunky and the pacing is stuck in low gear. Leonard has written a lot of great books, but this isn't one of them. (May)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Leonard doesn't write series novels, but every now and then, he brings back a favorite character, much to his fans ' delight. Here we're treated to the return of Carl Webster, the mythic marshal who starred in The Hot Kid (2005). It's the waning months of World War II, and Carl, no longer on the trail of Dust Bowl bank robbers, is tracking down a couple of escaped German POWs. The trail leads to Detroit, where it appears the POWs, Jurgen and Otto, are being hidden by a German-born butcher, Walter Shoen, who just happens to look exactly like Heinrich Himmler. Also involved are Walter's ex-wife, Honey Deal, who has no time for a bunch of Nazis who don't laugh at her jokes, and Vera Mezwa, a real-life German spy with a taste for the finer things, including her houseboy, the faux transvestite Bohdan. The happily married marshal hopes to use Honey as a way of getting at the Nazis through Walter, but his legendary single-mindedness takes a jolt when Honey starts to flirt. This being a Leonard novel, the dialogue flows as fast and as smooth as any words ever uttered in service of a story. It's as if the best of Mel Brooks and Quentin Tarantino were refined into something altogether finer and purer. And, in Honey Deal, Leonard has created yet another of his smart, ballsy, sexy, take-no-prisoners females. If there is a little more slapstick and a little less crime here than usual, it hardly matters. The talk's the thing. Leonard hooks you with his first quotation mark. Bill Ott
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on May 29 2007
Format: Paperback
Fans of The Hot Kid will like Up in Honey's Room much better than those who read Up in Honey's Room as a standalone novel. A good part of the book's appeal is in comparing Carl (Carlos) Webster's straight-shooting integrity with the slippery morals of the Nazi sympathizers in Up in Honey's Room.

Reading the book reminded me of the movie version of The Maltese Falcon where the greedy characters are often played for laughs while Sam Spade looks on with apparent disinterest . . . but with an intense desire to see justice done. Naturally, Carl Webster is in the Sam Spade role.

So how does Carl get involved with a bunch of Nazi sympathizers? It's simpler than it sounds: Carl is tracking down two escaped POWs: Jurgen Schrenk, a former Panzer captain for Rommel in North Africa, who is from Detroit originally, and Otto Penzler, an SS officer who did many dirty deeds in World War II. Carl figures that they must be in Detroit, or they would have been caught by now. He's right. Jurgen had tracked down an old friend, staunch pro-Nazi Walter Schoen, who runs a butcher shop in Detroit who has hidden the two men.

From there, Elmore Leonard delights in presenting you with the most amazing ironies that take a simple story into the happier realms of comedy. Walter is a look-alike for Heinrich Himmler, a resemblance that thrills Walter. He loves to tell people that the two men were born in the same hospital on the same day . . . surely they are twins who were separated at birth. Naturally, that means that Walter is overjoyed to have Otto around because of his SS background.

Walter is now acting as part of a spy ring for the Nazis . . . and once you meet the other members of the ring you'll be sure to understand why the Allies won World War II.
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By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on May 29 2007
Format: Hardcover
Fans of The Hot Kid will like Up in Honey's Room much better than those who read Up in Honey's Room as a standalone novel. A good part of the book's appeal is in comparing Carl (Carlos) Webster's straight-shooting integrity with the slippery morals of the Nazi sympathizers in Up in Honey's Room.

Reading the book reminded me of the movie version of The Maltese Falcon where the greedy characters are often played for laughs while Sam Spade looks on with apparent disinterest . . . but with an intense desire to see justice done. Naturally, Carl Webster is in the Sam Spade role.

So how does Carl get involved with a bunch of Nazi sympathizers? It's simpler than it sounds: Carl is tracking down two escaped POWs: Jurgen Schrenk, a former Panzer captain for Rommel in North Africa, who is from Detroit originally, and Otto Penzler, an SS officer who did many dirty deeds in World War II. Carl figures that they must be in Detroit, or they would have been caught by now. He's right. Jurgen had tracked down an old friend, staunch pro-Nazi Walter Schoen, who runs a butcher shop in Detroit who has hidden the two men.

From there, Elmore Leonard delights in presenting you with the most amazing ironies that take a simple story into the happier realms of comedy. Walter is a look-alike for Heinrich Himmler, a resemblance that thrills Walter. He loves to tell people that the two men were born in the same hospital on the same day . . . surely they are twins who were separated at birth. Naturally, that means that Walter is overjoyed to have Otto around because of his SS background.

Walter is now acting as part of a spy ring for the Nazis . . . and once you meet the other members of the ring you'll be sure to understand why the Allies won World War II.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
I usually don't care for sequels but this follow up to Leonard's "Hot Kid" I enjoyed more than the original. I would not mind seeing More Of US Marshal Carl Webster in the future! It's the final days of WWII and Gunslinging Marshal Webster is back in action trying to track down two escaped German POWs. He follows them to Detroit were they are being hidden by a German Butcher. The buthcher's exwife is a beautiful smart talking blonde named Hone Deal, who soon has straight arrow Marshal Webster considering breaking his marriage vows. The fun is in watching the interaction between Webster and Honey, while the marshal tries to find the escapees. I don't want to give away too much but this book's strength lies more in its use of humor than in actual crime plotting--Typical of this author. While "Hot Kid" was a kind of updated western, "Honey Deal" is a kind of sophisticated pot boiler mixed with some slapstick! Leonard is the master at mixing Genres.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I expected much more from Elmore Leonard. His usual sharp dialogue was missing and I had only very negative feelings for the German prisoner.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 77 reviews
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Not Leonard's best work July 18 2007
By Richard Mabry - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I was disappointed in this one. The first several chapters spent way too much time and space reviewing the plot from the previous Leonard book that this sequel follows. As always, he has created a cast of characters that are worth watching, but there's too much backstory and too many scenes that don't really contribute to the flow of action. I'm truly sorry, because I've always been an Elmore Leonard fan. I hope the next one is better.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Octogenarian Marvel Sept. 4 2007
By Bart King - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I remember reading an interview with Elmore Leonard in which he said that if a writer is constantly casting about for different ways to use the verb "said" he's wasting his time. The key is the dialogue itself, not how one describes its utterance.

As I marveled at Up in Honey's Room's succinct, unexpected, witty dialogue, I was reminded of Leonard's statement again and again. Sure, this novel features characters that are a bit too outrageous, and sure, a few of the plot developments are worthy of an eye roll or two. Is it his best work? No, but please, make no mistake: This is a lean, funny book.

I hope that I can appreciate good writing like this when I'm 82... which is how old Leonard was when he wrote this novel!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Try the audiobook Aug. 28 2008
By Prairie Pal - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Other commentators have mentioned that this is a slow-moving book and, to be fair, it is less action-packed than others that Elmore Leonard has written but it is well worth buying nonetheless. It is a comic novel, more like "Get Shorty" than "Cat Chaser", and is probably best approached through the audiobook format. There the narrator Arliss Howard brings all these character to life with a master-class in regional accents: Arkansas, Oklahoma, Germany, Ukraine, Kentucky, etc. The seven disks in the set made a long trip through the Midwest seem days shorter.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Spy Story April 22 2008
By Ted Feit - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Elmore Leonard has written at least 40 novels. Published last year in hardcover and being released this month in mass market paperback, Honey is among the best--if not the best, just because it departs from the customary. It is different from his past work in the sense that it is set in the last days of WW II and the characters include a supposed Nazi spy ring and two escaped German POWs. What is familiar is that it takes place in Detroit and U.S. Marshal Carl Webster returns, seeking to recapture the escaped prisoners.

A review can't capture the delightful story of Honey and do it justice. Just read the novel and enjoy the inventiveness, humor and writing of Elmore Leonard.
12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Too many viewpoints, not much happening June 28 2007
By Dave Schwinghammer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
World War II is winding toward a conclusion in this semi-farcical Leonard mystery. Two German prisoners have escaped and U.S. Marshall Carl Webster is hot on their trail. Webster tracks them to Detroit, where he's pretty sure they've connected with Nazi "provocateur" Walter Schoen.

Leonard uses multi-viewpoints to tell the story, and that's part of the problem with the book. Not very many of this cast of clowns are very likable or interesting. The title character, Honey Deal, Walter's former spouse, is the worst of the lot. Why in the world would a woman who looks like a Miss America contestant marry somebody like Walter Schoen, a Heinrich Himmler look-a-like? She also has the morals of an alley cat, unable to make up her mind whether she wants Carl Webster or former tank commander Jurgen Schrenk.

Carl Webster's background is also a bit hard to accept. The "Hot Kid" has a reputation as a hard-nosed G-Man, but he lets one of the incompetent Nazi spies get the drop on him. Even his wife is larger than life. She's a marine who teaches gunners how to fire a machine gun out of the back of a plane. Then there's Bohdan Kravchenko, the crazy transvestite. Sigh!

The plot isn't much to speak of either. Walter's co-conspirators, led by Vera Mezwa, just don't seem to have their hearts in it. Jurgen Shrenk is more interested in becoming a rodeo bull rider than he is in any kind of sabotage. The closest they get to undermining the American war effort is a deluded plot to kill the president, and only one of them is interested. Leonard seems to realize nothing much is happening, so he throws in a couple of distracting murders, the motivation for which is completely baffling.

Leonard does seem to be having fun at times. Correct me if I'm wrong but I believe the German word for pretty or beautiful is close to Schoen. Himmler was one of the ugliest men in record history. Also one of the escaped prisoners is named Otto Penzler, an editor at Mysterious Press. I sort of perked up when Penzler was seduced by an American con woman who needed a partner to help sell smuggled nazi contraband, but Leonard quickly drops this thread for the pedestrian stuff.

I've read about a half dozen Leonard novels. He's usually quite good at hooking the reader, then gets loose in the middle, before finishing strong. Nothing works here.


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