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Up Up Up Up Up


Price: CDN$ 19.08 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
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14 new from CDN$ 10.56 33 used from CDN$ 0.01 1 collectible from CDN$ 25.30

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Dec 12 2011)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Festival Distribution Inc.
  • ASIN: B00000G4NS
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (118 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #101,053 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. 'Tis Of Thee
2. Virtue
3. Come Away From It
4. Jukebox
5. Angel Food
6. Angry Any More
7. Everest
8. Up Up Up Up Up Up
9. Know Now Then
10. Trickle Down
11. Hat Shaped Hat

Product Description

Review

DiFranco creates a spare, mesmerizing batch of treats, including "'Tis of Thee," about an America that forgets its poor and is transfixed by Jerry Springer. -- People

On her 12th album, the maverick singer/songwriter ... continues to air personal and political concerns in lyrics deliciously sharp and refreshingly free of sentimentality and soapbox stridency. -- USA Today

She isn't a very inspired melodist--despite all the flashy effects. -- Entertainment Weekly

When the Buffalo, N.Y., native rails against economic injustice or institutionalized sexism, she forgoes puffed-up rancor in favor of a racy, street-smart vernacular that cuts to the heart of the matter with headstrong fervor. -- Los Angeles Times

Amazon.ca

Whereas on Little Plastic Castle Ani DiFranco questioned her public image in song, here the fiercely independent singer/songwriter turns away from stardom's beckoning questions to further explore her emotional balance. "Angry Anymore" is a back-porch country song (with banjo and accordion) about coming to terms with a turbulent adolescence. "Everest" floats by as a reverie of spiritual rejuvenation. Most effective is "'Tis of Thee", which deals with racial injustice. The politics are oversimplified, but the melody is one of DiFranco's strongest. She even funks it up on the extended drum-machine-driven jam "Hat Shaped Hat". But while DiFranco enjoys playing around ("Know Now Then" features a "space phone" vocal), she's strongest when most contemplative, as the title track bears out. Backed by organ, piano, and guitar, she espouses this grand truth: "Half of learning how to play / Is learning what not to play." In her quietest moments DiFranco is living proof of simplicity's great power. --Rob O'Connor

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

By Sarah on Oct. 29 2002
Format: Audio CD
While I can agree with some that this is not Ani's best or even most accessible album, I must add that this is a beautiful album. As a huge Ani fan, I rushed out to buy this one and was stragenly disappointed...it sat on my bookshelf for months until I revisited it. I found some wonderful songs, beautiful language, and above all, the trademark earnestness that Ani Difranco is so famous for. While I can't say this is my favorite Ani album, I really respect the chances she takes and the trust she puts in her audience to come along for the ride. Not necessarily a must-have, but a must-listen. If you're looking for the angriness you find on other albums, it's not present here as it is on NAPG. If you're looking for a bouncy, catchy CD like Little Plastic Castle, it's not here. But if you want to listen to Ani's ever-maturing sound, this is a great album to start with ...most longtime Ani fans would agree. Her newer stuff is such a departure from her early work, it's finally refreshing to see an artist take strides to refine and experiment with her own sound, rather than rely on what she already knows works so well. That is truly what makes Ms D stand out: her willingness to forget the format and just play, for her own enjoyment as well as her audience's.
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By Noreaster on Oct. 22 2001
Format: Audio CD
When I first got this cd, I tore it open and devoured it. And hated it. I thought it was grating, I thought it was pretentious, and I was mad at *my* Ani DiFranco for doing something different.
Now, 3+ years later, I see it differently. Watching Ani move from Upx6 to "To the Teeth" to "Revelling/Reckoning," I see the important place that Up... holds. It is part of an astounding evolution. After the first 5 albums, Ani has grown on each and every album, changing styles and directions. That said, I must say that Up Up Up is not my favorite. While I appreciate it more now than I did, there are still tracks I can't stomach (Come Away From It) and those I love (Angry Anymore).
I wouldn't recommend this album for someone who's new to Ani (try Out of Range or Little Plastic Castle instead) but it is worth your time, something I have ultimately realized. Up Up Up Up Up Up represents something different from what *my* favorite Ani stuff is, but it is still better than half the stuff out there, it is still powerful, and still worth your time. For every person like me who would choose Out of Range over this album any day of the week, there is someone who feels the exact opposite. What is great is that there are artists like DiFranco out there who are indeed *artists*, growing, experimenting, and as Michaelangelo once said, "still learning."
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Format: Audio CD
After hearing so much about Ani Di Franco from fellow feminists raving about her girl power and independantly minded lyrics, I decided I would have to get an Ani Album. I'm not a big folk musik officiando, but after reading the lyrics to 'Blood in the Boardroom', I figured she was definetely worth a shot.
I don't even remember why I chose Up Up Up Up Up Up - I think it was the cheapest there, and I didn't want to spend too much on an album I might not like. I took it home, and slipped it in while I messed around the house.
Well, I wasn't real impressed. Nothing really grabbed me or got my attention. Probably because I wasn't concentrating on the musik, but letting it play in the background. I took it out later, mentally marking it as not exactly a waste of money, but not something I was gonna listen to for the sake of hearing it.
Anyway, just last week I'd decided to rotate the CDs in my collection that I hardly listen to, taking them into work so I could listen to them there and get to know them better. Up Up Up Up UP Up was one....
I don't know what it was, but as it played through the day (I put it on repeat) I found myself paying more and more attention to the songs and lyrics. By the end of the day, I was berating myself for letting it sit on my CD rack for so many months in silence!
Her lyrics and musik strike me as akin to PJ Harvey, another favourite, in their poetic, catchy simplicity. The two artists are very different indeed, but they both capture an immense raw energy and beauty.
It must be the Tom Waits/Tori Amos fan in me, but my favourites on this album are the ones everyone else is dissing...like Angel Food, Come Away, Hat Shaped Hat and Know Now Then. I love the lyrics and the way she's singing.
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By A Customer on Dec 9 2000
Format: Audio CD
The 1960s were a time when legions of young, guitar-strumming troubadours crisscrossed the land, singing socially conscious story songs that you could tap your feet to . . . or so some of we old-timers would like our sometimes socially unconscious children to believe.
Well, here is a singer who seems sprung whole from that very myth. DiFranco was born in 1970 to parents whose Buffalo home was a stopping place for itinerant musicians. A performer before she was 10, she is an aggressively independent folkie with a passion for funky rhythms and lefty politics.
On this, her 12th album, DiFranco creates a mesmerizing batch of treats, including "'Tis of Thee," about an America that forgets its poor and is transfixed by Jerry Springer; "Trickle Down," set in the streets of Buffalo, where "you cease to smell the steel plant after you've lived here for a while"; and a gospel-inflected ditty in which she scat-sings about an all-night rap session with "a man in the shape of a man/ holding a hat-shaped hat."
Music and politics--Ani masterfully meshes the mix.
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