Quantity:1
Add to Cart
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.

More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

V 13: Complete Keyboard Sonata


Price: CDN$ 10.31 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
17 new from CDN$ 6.40 1 used from CDN$ 15.29

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Chu-Fang Huang Plays Scarlatti Sonatas Nov. 27 2010
By Robin Friedman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Naxos' ongoing series of the complete keyboard sonatas of Domenico Scarlatti (1685 -- 1757) offers the opportunity to get to know these inexhaustible short works and to hear a variety of gifted pianists. The newest release in the series meets both these goals. The CD is the 13th in the series, bringing it to about the halfway point in Scarlatti's over 550 works for the keyboard. It features the young pianist Chu-Hang Huang playing a varied program of 16 Scarlatti sonatas, most of which I had not heard before. Huang began her piano studies at the age of 7 in her native China. In 2005, Huang won First Prize in the 2005 Clevland International Piano Competition, and in 2006 she was First Prize winner in the 2006 Young Concert Artists International Auditions. Since that time, she has concertized widely. She has a promising career ahead of her. The CD was recorded in 2008 in Canada.

The 16 sonatas on this CD are a varied group, and Huang's performance sparkles. The program is weighted towards earlier works with 9 sonatas having numbers in the Kirkpatrick listing of under 200. Scarlatti's early sonatas tend to be virtuosic in character with flamboyant runs, shifting rhythms, wide intervals, and extensive passages of hand crossings. Huang performs with clarity and verve. The CD also includes several minor key works of a reflective character and some longer sonatas. Huang's playing was thoughtful andexpressive. Huang is sensitive to the quicksilver idiosyncratic character of Scarlatti's writing. She gives a good deal of attention to changes in dynamics, rhthym and tempo. I envied her smooth playing of running thirds, octaves, and sixths. Her ornamentation of Scarlatti's scores tends to be free and effective.

A highlight of Huang's performance is the sonata in D major, K. 491, a well-known work which appears in Ralph Kirkpatrick's popular two-volume edition of 60 Scarlatti sonatas. This is a large-scale sonata which opens with three ornamented notes in the right hand echoed immediately in the left hand. The music moves easily through a succession of sixths with octave accompaniments until it reaches a long, pregnant pause. It then proceeds with long smooth passages of running 16th notes working towards a conclusion in beautifully-played thirds. In the second part of the piece, Scarlatti varies his material but continues to emphasize repeated notes and rhythms, sudden pauses, and the runs in sixths and thirds. This is a grand sonata. Listening to Huang play the piece made me want to try to study and learn it myself.

Other works I enjoyed on this CD include the virtuosic sonata in E major, K. 28, with its extensive passages of hand crossing and irresistible passages of little filigree runs. This sonata also appears in the Kirkpatrick edition. The sonatas in F major, K. 205 and in D major, K. 534 are both lilting, flowing works. The sonata in e minor, K. 232, the longest piece included on this CD, is a slow, poignant and reflective work. Huang captured the pathos of the music and her performance held my attention throughout.

Huang's CD is an excellent addtion to the Naxos series. Listenders wanting to take the time to explore Scarlatti one CD at a time will enjoy this onging survey of Scarlatti on the piano.

Robin Friedman
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
The Naxos Scarlatti Sonata Series Continues Oct. 27 2010
By J Scott Morrison - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Believe it or not, this thirteenth volume of recordings of Scarlatti sonatas is only barely past the halfway mark to the complete traversal; it is expected to take a total of twenty-five CDs to complete the lot. Naxos elected to use a different pianist for each of the CDs and thus we have been introduced to a number of fine mostly young pianists including Soyeon Lee, Colleen Lee, Eteri Andjaparidze, and Gerda Struhal, as well as hearing some more established artists like Konstantin Scherbakov and Benjamin Frith. Now comes another youngster and another Asian woman (like the two Lees): Chu-Fang Huang. She is a native of China, studied at Curtis and Juilliard and was a finalist in the 2005 Van Cliburn Competition and winner of the Cleveland International Piano Competition. That said, this disc is not, in my opinion, one of the real highlights of the series although everything is played with rhythmic precision and infallible technique. But something is missing. The playing sounds rather mechanical, a real hazard in Scarlatti. And Huang almost entirely ignores Scarlatti's playfulness, his humor. Her approach works just fine in the moto perpetuo sonatas like the one in G minor, K.71/L.81/P.17 but really misses in others, e.g. the D Major, K.164/L.59/P.274. Further, the slower sonatas such as the D Major, K.534/L.11/P.538 tend to be a bit bloodless. One can almost hear her holding back as if afraid to commit any romantic solecisms and in the process the feeling drains out of these slower sonatas.

I have a hunch that Ms Huang is by nature better suited to the big Romantic works and I note on her agent's website that she has played the Rachmaninoff Second Concerto with the Detroit Symphony. Now THAT I would have wanted to hear.

Scott Morrison

Look for similar items by category


Feedback