CDN$ 19.97 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
In Stock. Sold by niff78
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by beat_goes_on
Condition: Used: Like New
Compare Offers on Amazon
Add to Cart
CDN$ 29.41
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: OMydeals
Add to Cart
CDN$ 40.49
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: M and N Media Canada
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Vampire Journals - DVD
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

Vampire Journals - DVD


Price: CDN$ 19.97
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by niff78.
4 new from CDN$ 19.97 7 used from CDN$ 4.68


Product Details

  • Actors: Jonathon Morris, David Gunn, Kirsten Cerre, Starr Andreeff, Ilinca Goia
  • Directors: Ted Nicolaou
  • Writers: Ted Nicolaou
  • Producers: Charles Band, Kirk Edward Hansen, Oana Paunescu, Vlad Paunescu
  • Format: Color, DVD-Video, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: All RegionsAll Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Video Service Corp.
  • Release Date: Oct. 26 1999
  • Run Time: 82 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 1573470473
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #126,361 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Product Description

Director Ted Nicolaou rewrites his original Subspecies story line and transplants it into the urban location of Bucharest, Romania. In this gothic tale, a wandering vampire named Zachary (subtly played by David Gunn) seeks revenge against the clan

Amazon.ca

Director Ted Nicolaou rewrites his original Subspecies story line and transplants it into the urban location of Bucharest, Romania. In this gothic tale, a wandering vampire named Zachary (subtly played by David Gunn) seeks revenge against the clan of vampires who crossed him over from mortal life. The abduction of acquaintance and young concert pianist Sofia (the charming Kirstin Cerre) lures him to the lair of Ash (Jonathon Morris) and his den of vampires living beneath a ritzy nightclub. In an interesting twist, the bloodsuckers do not commonly hunt down their prey in the outside world; rather, they seek them in willing bodies through the club, with whose owner they have dealings. Zachary seeks to free the terrified, imprisoned Sofia, who Ash has crossed over, and put an end to the clan's evil, decadent ways. In some instances, Vampire Journals suffers from melodramatic acting and overwrought dialogue, and conversation dominates overaction, but the combination of exquisite Romanian locations, Adolfo Bartoli's sumptuous cinematography, and Richard Kosinki's moody score will keep you watching. Another striking aspect of the film is that it is shot almost exclusively at nighttime, with the beautiful interiors often bathed in golden light; it offers a good representation of what living in eternal night must be like. --Bryan Reesman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Feb. 20 2012
Format: DVD
"Vampire Journals" is a wonderful movie. An awful movie. This is a WONDERFUL, AWFUL movie that takes every romantic vampire cliche in existence and squashes them into a big velvet-and-lace disaster.

In fact, watching this movie is kind of like diving headfirst into the fanfiction of a 13-year-old Anne Rice fan, with lots of lace, velvet, classical music, marble pillars and flowing hair. It moves very slowly and there isn't actually a lot going on, but the serious, melodramatic tone of every scene makes it unintentionally hilarious ("I have no wish to violate your flesh!").

The story follows Zachary (David Gunn), a melancholy vampire with a conscience who seeks to destroy all vampires of his bloodline. Fortunately, he has the Sword of Laertes, which has the power to kill vampires... just like every other sword.

Zachary's latest target is Ash (Jonathon Morris), a master vampire with a love of classical music -- and he's fixed his gaze on Sofia (Kirsten Cerre), a talented young pianist. Zachary manages to rescue Sofia from Ash at first, but it turns out Ash has invited her to perform at his personal abode, Club Muse (which is a sort of casino/brothel/vampire restaurant).

Well, you can probably guess exactly what Ash has in store for Sofia -- he wants to immortalize her musical skills by turning her into a vampire. So he entraps her in his bedroom, slowly breaking her will so that she will accept him as her master. Zachary has only a short time to save her, but doing so might lure him back to the darkness.

"Vampire Journals" is one of those baroque/gothic/romantic slabs of vampire fantasy -- graveyards, wrought-iron, classical music, silk and satin and lace, old world aristocrats and vast shadowy mansions filled with marble.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By elfdart on April 15 2008
Format: DVD
well, i'd say i'm kind of into the vampire scene. it's not my number one obsession, but i do appreciate a good vampire story. this movie was, well just ok. this movie wasn't really fresh, the 'vampire who cares about what he's eating' character seems to be explored a lot, so i kind of knew what was coming, but this wasn't what held it back from being great. what i didn't like was the fact that at the end of the movie i was still waiting for something to happen. the movie spends too much time introducing the characters and the setting and not enough actually dealing with what it has created. basically i didn't really feel connected to any of the characters, enough so that the achieving or failure of achieving their goals were irrelevant to me. right now if i was asked 'who is zachery' i would know who he is from the stereotypes surrounding that character type, but the movie didn't go into enough detail concerning his personality, his motives, his history... i could have told you who zachery was without watching the movie.

basically the characters were kind of flat.

and the movie is all suspense, but the ending isn't a sufficient catharsis. maybe because i wasn't that drawn into the characters the ending didn't quite satisfy me. but i think that there wasn't enough happening in the story, or more, what was happening wasn't fleshed out to its full potential, leaving me wanting more... but not in a good way.

aside from my criticisms however, the movie is worth viewing and isn't that bad. the music was alright and the costumes weren't bad either. the setting wasn't too bad either. though i unfortunately found no one in the movie attractive, i was oddly compelled to the guy who played zachery's mouth. when there was a close up of him that's what my eyes were drawn to. and of course the coming and going of the vampires when they fly was amusing. and the atmosphere was appropriate i think. all in all worth the watch.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: DVD
This straight-to-video movie (not based on the book) is a strange mixture of the quite good and the rather bad. Filmed in Romania, it takes advantage of the wonderful old grand houses there, with their marble walls and floors and inlaid wood-work and gold leaf. (Perhaps also qualifying as "scenery" are the several gratuitous naked female torsos on view, which seem to be present only for commercial reasons.) However, it is shot in full-screen (4:3) and recorded in mono, so your expensive home theatre equipment will not do you much good.
The story is archetypal for the modern vampire genre: a lone "good" vampire, a vampire enclave racked by resentment and power struggles, a bleak ending. The film makes few concessions to those unfamiliar with the tenets of the genre, which may cause a jarring effect.
Full Moon Productions continue their tradition of casting the best actors in the supporting roles: Starr Andreeff is convincing in the tricky role of a human who serves the vampires from avaricious motives, while Kirsten Cerre manages to sustain a note of high terror through the second half of the film, believably and without becoming repetitive or shrill. Kudos also to the actors who play the parts of Cassandra, Dimitri and Anton. It would be great to see these actors in bigger and better productions. The two main parts, however, are miscast: the "hero" is callow and simply unconvincing (I kept expecting him to finish his lines with the word "dude"), while the "villain" is impressive, but with a rather humourless, one-note performance.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback