CDN$ 50.82
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Venus in Furs has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Venus in Furs Hardcover – May 23 2010

2.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all 87 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover, May 23 2010
CDN$ 50.82
CDN$ 50.82

Save an Additional 10% on Textbooks When you Join Amazon Student

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Amazon Student members save an additional 10% on Textbooks with promo code TEXTBOOK10. Enter code TEXTBOOK10 at checkout. Here's how (restrictions apply)

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Hardcover: 108 pages
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing (May 23 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1161484361
  • ISBN-13: 978-1161484366
  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 0.8 x 28 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 499 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,730,365 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Product Description

About the Author

Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (27 January 1836 — 9 March 1895) was an Austrian writer and journalist. During his lifetime, Sacher-Masoch was well known as a man of letters, a utopian thinker who espoused socialist and humanist ideals in his fiction and non-fiction. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
Leopold von Sacher-Masoch was born in Lemberg, Austrian Galicia, on January 27, 1836. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
_Venus in Furs, a Novel: Letters of Leopold von Sacher-Masoch and Emilie Mataja_ by Leopold von Sacher-Masoch contains the both the story "Venus in Furs" and a selection of letters between Sacher-Masoch and budding writer, Emilie Mataja.

"Venus in Furs" is about a man who is obsessed with having his new mistress treat him like a slave. In particular, he wants her to become his ideal "venus in furs" and begs her to don furs and wield a whip against him. His desire to be treated as such is tested when she convinces him to sign an agreement to be her slave. The story is well-written, and one becomes drawn into the misery experienced by the man as his mistress becomes progressively more cruel.

The letters between Sacher- Masoch and Mataja show Sacher-Masoch's inability at times to separate his fiction from his real life. Sacher-Masoch speaks of his married life and encourages Mataja in her writing, but his
professional encouragement is shot through with requests to meet Mataja so that he can be whipped by her while she is wearing fur.

Although there are certainly more graphically erotic examples present in current fiction, this book is a must read for those wanting to know why Sacher-Masoch's writings inspired Krafft-Ebing to create the term "masochism."
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I had to read this book for a class and it was by far the most annoying book I have ever read. It is a ridiculous story, and so so repetitive. I love romance novels, but this is nothing like a normal love story. It is disgusting. Thank God it's short because I couldn't have read another page.
0 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9dd32f00) out of 5 stars 30 reviews
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9dcd4f78) out of 5 stars derivation of the term "masochism" July 25 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
_Venus in Furs, a Novel: Letters of Leopold von Sacher-Masoch and Emilie Mataja_ by Leopold von Sacher-Masoch contains the both the story "Venus in Furs" and a selection of letters between Sacher-Masoch and budding writer, Emilie Mataja.

"Venus in Furs" is about a man who is obsessed with having his new mistress treat him like a slave. In particular, he wants her to become his ideal "venus in furs" and begs her to don furs and wield a whip against him. His desire to be treated as such is tested when she convinces him to sign an agreement to be her slave. The story is well-written, and one becomes drawn into the misery experienced by the man as his mistress becomes progressively more cruel.

The letters between Sacher- Masoch and Mataja show Sacher-Masoch's inability at times to separate his fiction from his real life. Sacher-Masoch speaks of his married life and encourages Mataja in her writing, but his
professional encouragement is shot through with requests to meet Mataja so that he can be whipped by her while she is wearing fur.

Although there are certainly more graphically erotic examples present in current fiction, this book is a must read for those wanting to know why Sacher-Masoch's writings inspired Krafft-Ebing to create the term "masochism."
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9dcd933c) out of 5 stars Very different from what I expected Nov. 10 2007
By Sylvia B. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I wanted to read this book for years, and when it finally crossed my radar here at Amazon, I snapped it up with very high expectations. However, my reading experience was very different from my expectations of it.

Considering that Sacher-Masoch's name ended up being a synonym for an entire branch of sexuality, I was disappointed to discover that Venus in Furs is *not* a story about a masochistic relationship (except in a more dysfunctional meaning of the word).

While the main characters do enjoy some aspects of masochism/sadism, they mainly use it as a weapon against each other in an intense gender power struggle. People in the fetish community will recognize the term "topping from the bottom", (and others will be more familiar with "passive-aggressive"), where the submissive/masochistic partner tries to use his/her "sacrifice" to gain covert control over the relationship and the dominant partner, while avoiding actually taking responsibility for what happens. If you're looking for a genuine story about the sadistic/masochistic aspect of human sexuality, you will be disappointed by Venus in Furs.

On the other hand, this book is an intense historical document about the Western view of gender and relationships a hundred years ago, which is still very much present in today's Western countries. It's fascinating, funny, sad and horrifying at the same time, to be for a while steeped into an idea of the world in which relationships are a brute power struggle in which one side must always lose, and the only way a person can hope to keep both his/her self and his/her beloved is to "win" by deception, intimidation, domination, violence and mind-games. It's a story about wounded, neurotic, fearful and repressed love in a culture which applied Nitsche and Darwin very literally and simplistically to every aspect of human life.
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9dcd930c) out of 5 stars Thank you Madam, may I have another? July 22 2000
By George Schaefer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is an extraordinary work of sexual deviation. It goes without say that Sacher-Masoch supplied the M in S & M. This novel which mirrors a relationship in Sacher-Masochs real life is a disarmingly sensual tale. While I have no desire to be tied up and whipped, I found myself deeply engrossed in Severins plight into abuse and humiliation. This philosophy of the hammer or the anvil is interesting to me. Obviously, Severin prefers to be the anvil to Wandas hammer. This confuses me as I believe in human dignity but to each his own. I can not agree with the hammer or anvil theory but I suppose that it is a formula that works for many people. It apparently was quite thrilling to Sacher-Masoch. This is an amazingly frank work. It is sensual and poignant simultaneously. Reccommended.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9dcd9708) out of 5 stars The roots of Masochism Sept. 3 2008
By Alena - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The term "Masochism" was named for the author of Venus in Furs, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, who wrote his own personal fantasies in a semi-autobiographical novella. I read this book in one night and could not put it down. The beginning and middle were entirely gripping as a young man, who has always feared women, is enveloped in his love and obsession for a woman he feels embodies Venus, the goddess of love and beauty. A sickly erotic relationship develops as the couple fall in love where the young man begs his Venus in furs to be his master and treat him like her slave. As the novella continues, the masochistic relationship develops to a point where I felt a little disinterested and somewhat turned off and frustrated by the loss of passion and affection in the name of self destruction. However, this tale tells of love in a way that many are curious about yet never glimpse. I study Art History, especially Symbolism, and having done a lot of research about Gustav Klimt, I have noticed many interested and fascinating parallels between Klimt and the narrator on their view of women as being a dangerous siren and overpowering being. "Venus in Furs" captured me with its type of twisted erotica meshed into deep love and powerful emotions. At the end I understood in a very impressing way the story behind the painting introduced at the beginning of the novella that subsequently was its close, the painting of a semi-nude Venus in furs with a whip standing over her pathetically devoted lover.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9dcd9924) out of 5 stars Worthwhile Sept. 2 2011
By Woodie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A freakish love story if there ever was one. Not the best book but interesting all the same. At least now I know what I wouldn't want to participate in with a woman.

Look for similar items by category


Feedback